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314

I was able to duplicate your problem. This is what fixed it for me. Add QuartzCore.framework to your project and this line to your .m file. #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>


221

As Ben said, you'll need to work with the UIView's layer, using a CATransform3D to perform the layer's rotation. The trick to get perspective working, as described here, is to directly access one of the matrix cells of the CATransform3D (m34). Matrix math has never been my thing, so I can't explain exactly why this works, but it does. You'll need to set ...


207

Use: #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> ....... [myView.layer removeAllAnimations];


121

To expand upon what Nikolai said, the best way to handle this is to use Core Animation to animate the motion of the image or view along a Bezier path. This is accomplished using a CAKeyframeAnimation. For example, I've used the following code to animate an image of a view into an icon to indicate saving (as can be seen in the video for this application): ...


121

Found a method (I modified it a bit) that worked perfectly for me: iphone UIImageView rotation - (void) runSpinAnimationOnView:(UIView*)view duration:(CGFloat)duration rotations:(CGFloat)rotations repeat:(float)repeat; { CABasicAnimation* rotationAnimation; rotationAnimation = [CABasicAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"transform.rotation.z"]; ...


114

I have posted an example in my blog: CGPoint originalCenter = icon.center; [UIView animateWithDuration:2.0 animations:^{ CGPoint center = icon.center; center.y += 60; icon.center = center; } completion:^(BOOL finished){ [UIView ...


114

A while ago I learned that when you have custom drawing code, you have to check for the retina display and scale your graphics accordingly. UIKit takes care of most of this, including font scaling. Not so with CATextLayer. My blurriness came from having a .zPosition that was not zero, that is, I had a transform applied to my parent layer. By setting this ...


97

From the UIView reference's section about the beginAnimations:context: method: Use of this method is discouraged in iPhone OS 4.0 and later. You should use the block-based animation methods instead. Eg of Block-based Animation based on Tom's Comment [UIView transitionWithView:mysuperview duration:0.75 ...


90

You can do this by setting the actions dictionary on the layer to return [NSNull null] as an animation for the appropriate key. For example, I use NSMutableDictionary *newActions = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithObjectsAndKeys:[NSNull null], @"onOrderIn", [NSNull null], @"onOrderOut", ...


78

What you really should do is to animate the stroke of a CAShapeLayer where the path is a circle. This will be accelerated using Core Animation and is less messy then to draw part of a circle in -drawRect:. The code below will create a circle shape layer in the center of the screen and animate the stroke of it clockwise so that it looks as if it is being ...


77

The way I do it is to create a new animation to your end point. Set a very short duration and make sure you use the +setAnimationBeginsFromCurrentState: method to start from the current state. When you set it to YES, the current animation is cut short. Looks something like this: [UIView beginAnimations:nil context:NULL]; [UIView ...


74

Recently appeared Apple's technical note QA1673 describes how to pause/resume layer's animation. Pause and resume animations listing is below: -(void)pauseLayer:(CALayer*)layer { CFTimeInterval pausedTime = [layer convertTime:CACurrentMediaTime() fromLayer:nil]; layer.speed = 0.0; layer.timeOffset = pausedTime; } ...


71

You want to wrap your call in the following: [CATransaction begin]; [CATransaction setValue: (id) kCFBooleanTrue forKey: kCATransactionDisableActions]; layer.position = CGPointMake(x, y); [CATransaction commit];


68

Adding a shadowPath should give you a huge performance boost. The following example assumes you only want the shadow on the sides of your view CGPathRef path = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRect:view.bounds].CGPath; [view.layer setShadowPath:path]; EDIT: On default a CALayer draws a shadow during animations, the following code allows you to cache the shadow ...


67

I wrote that post. It's overkill for a UIView, plus the parameters are geared toward an OSX app. Do this instead. CABasicAnimation *animation = [CABasicAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"position"]; [animation setDuration:0.05]; [animation setRepeatCount:8]; [animation setAutoreverses:YES]; [animation setFromValue:[NSValue ...


66

- (void) attachPopUpAnimation { CAKeyframeAnimation *animation = [CAKeyframeAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"transform"]; CATransform3D scale1 = CATransform3DMakeScale(0.5, 0.5, 1); CATransform3D scale2 = CATransform3DMakeScale(1.2, 1.2, 1); CATransform3D scale3 = CATransform3DMakeScale(0.9, 0.9, 1); CATransform3D scale4 = ...


66

You can create an animated GIF using the Image I/O framework (which is part of the iOS SDK). You will also want to include the MobileCoreServices framework, which defines the GIF type constant. You need to add these frameworks to your target, and import their headers in the file where you want to create the animated GIF, like this: #import ...


65

I have been using the latter for a lot of nice lightweight animations. You can use it crossfade two views, or fade one in in front of another, or fade it out. You can shoot a view over another like a banner, you can make a view stretch or shrink... I'm getting a lot of mileage out of beginAnimation/commitAnimations. Don't think that all you can do is: ...


64

i have solved in this way: leftScrollView.clipsToBounds = YES; CALayer *rightBorder = [CALayer layer]; rightBorder.borderColor = [UIColor darkGrayColor].CGColor; rightBorder.borderWidth = 1; rightBorder.frame = CGRectMake(-1, -1, CGRectGetWidth(leftScrollView.frame), CGRectGetHeight(leftScrollView.frame)+2); [leftScrollView.layer ...


61

I can't find it documented anywhere, but it appears the backgroundColor property of UILabel is not animatable, as your code works fine with a vanilla UIView. This hack appears to work, however, as long as you don't set the background color of the label view itself: #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> ... theLabel.layer.backgroundColor = [UIColor ...


61

Magenta overlays are caused by subpixel misalignment, while yellow overlays are caused by stretching. Prior to iOS 4, Instruments used magenta for both.


60

Yes, it's possible (only in the latest Core Animation releases though, I believe, i.e. iPhone 3.0+ and OS X 10.6+). Make your property dynamic so that CA implements the accessors for you: @dynamic myInt; Tell the layer that changes of the property require redrawing: + (BOOL)needsDisplayForKey:(NSString*)key { if ([key isEqualToString:@"myInt"]) { ...


60

When you add an animation to a layer, the animation does not change the layer's properties. Instead, the system creates a copy of the layer. The original layer is called the model layer, and the duplicate is called the presentation layer. The presentation layer's properties change as the animation progresses, but the model layer's properties stay ...


57

Batgar's technique is too complicated. Why not take advantage of the forKey parameter in addAnimation? It was intended for this very purpose. Just take out the call to setValue and move the key string to the addAnimation call. For example: [[hearingAidHalo layer] addAnimation:animation forKey:@"Throb"]; Then, in your animationDidStop callback, you can do ...


57

You can rotate a view, by some number of radians, regardless of whether it is less than a full rotation or many multiples of a full rotation, without having to split the rotation into pieces. As an example, the following code will spin a view, once per second, for a specified number of seconds. You can easily modify it to spin a view by a certain number of ...


57

You were almost there. CABasicAnimation *crossFade = [CABasicAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"contents"]; crossFade.duration = 5.0; crossFade.fromValue = image1.CGImage; crossFade.toValue = image2.CGImage; [self.imageView.layer addAnimation:crossFade forKey:@"animateContents"]; Note that the animation is independent of the actual values/contents of the ...


56

Also: [CATransaction begin]; [CATransaction setValue:(id)kCFBooleanTrue forKey:kCATransactionDisableActions]; //foo [CATransaction commit];


54

UIAlertView uses a more sophisticated animation: scale to larger than 100% scale to smaller than 100% scale to 100% Here's an implementation using a CAKeyFrameAnimation: view.alpha = 0; [UIView animateWithDuration:0.1 animations:^{view.alpha = 1.0;}]; view.layer.transform = CATransform3DMakeScale(0.5, 0.5, 1.0); CAKeyframeAnimation *bounceAnimation = ...


53

Using iOS 4+ block based UIKit animations (and loosely based on on jayccrown's answer): - (void)shakeView:(UIView *)viewToShake { CGFloat t = 2.0; CGAffineTransform translateRight = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformIdentity, t, 0.0); CGAffineTransform translateLeft = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformIdentity, -t, 0.0); ...



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