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0

You are so close to the solution! If you are using sections in your table view, and sorting your table view data, it is important to understand that the first sort descriptor must be identical to the sectionNameKeyPath. As such I recommend you change your code to be something similar to this... NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription ...


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Use the collection object NSSet... Following this line in your fetchItems method: NSArray *dictionaries = [[[NSApp delegate] managedObjectContext] executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:nil]; Add this line: NSSet *setDictionaries = [NSSet setWithArray:dictionaries]; Change your log: NSLog (@"names: %@",setDictionaries); Refer to Apple ...


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It depends on the xcode you are using In ios8 It stored somewhere / Library/Developer/CoreSimulator/Devices/(numbers and letters)/data/Containers/Data/Application/(numbers and letters)/Documents/ (numbers and letters) stands for a folder that would be unique to your app/computer, but would look like this: ...


4

It happens because the setter that you wrote calls the setter. self.ou = ... calls the setter again, so you got yourself a nice infinite recursion. That is as long as the stack lasts.


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What you really want to do is validate the data coming in. Since RestKit is using CoreData it automatically uses the validation built into CoreData (see here) Here is an example that will ensure that the date never gets changed to an earlier one. - (BOOL) validateChangeDate:(id *)ioValue error: (NSError **)outError { if ([[*ioValue ...


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I think it is a Bug, i have the same issue only with iphone 5s (iOS 7.1). It accidentally worked by choosing the .xcdatamodeld and under the "File Inspector" under "Target Membership" removing the check from the project.


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Did you save changes with the context? Something like: NSError *error = nil; NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext = self.managedObjectContext; if (managedObjectContext != nil) { if ([managedObjectContext hasChanges] && ![managedObjectContext save:&error]) { // Replace this implementation with code to handle the error ...


0

There's no way to just save the in-memory NSPersistentStore to a file. It doesn't conform to NSCoding or provide any methods of its own that would enable this, and the only way to ask it for its data is the usual Core Data approach of fetching it. However, you can migrate to a file-based store pretty easily. Use your persistent store coordinator to migrate ...


1

You can use a NSPredicate: NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"title == %@ AND size == %@ AND colour == %@", bagItem.title, bagItem.size, bagItem.color]; NSArray *filtered = [arrayOfItems filteredArrayUsingPredicate:predicate]; You can get the sum with KVC, something like: NSNumber *total = [filtered ...


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The following will completely delete the MagicalRecord CoreData sqlite files, as well as the -wal and -shm files. MagicalRecord puts them all in the Library folder; this will simply remove all files from the folder. This will not work if you have other data you need to persist in the Library folder, I did not: - (void)resetCoreDataDB { [MagicalRecord ...


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This model doesn't seem right. First, you should name the relationships to describe what they are pointing to. Second, all relationships should have an inverse relationship. Third, don't give your entity a plural name. Call it Memo not Memos. It will make everything easier. Fourth, don't use foreign keys in objects (like staffid) instead create a ...


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solution with numberWithBool: import UIKit import CoreData @objc(Test) class Test: NSManagedObject { @NSManaged var title: String @NSManaged var field: NSNumber } test.field = NSNumber.numberWithBool(false)


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Alteratively, rather than a string, you could create an Entity to represent a point with it's x and y values.


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TL;DR; There is no good reason to use a context on the main queue. can use NSFetchedResultsController to fetch data in background Absolutely. NSFetchedResultsController can be used with a private queue context. It is, in fact, quite happy and performant when doing so. There is a bug that prevents NSFetchedResultsController from using it's cache when ...


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Okay ,you can store an NSDate as a string. NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc]init]; [dateFormat setDateFormat:@"YYYY-MM-dd hh:mm:ss"]; NSString *dateString = [dateFormat stringFromDate:yourNSDate]; But, its always better to store date in the NSDate format rather that storing it as a string. NSDate would just be a large integer ...


0

Your crash does not have anything to do with Core Data. Change this: [delegate performSelector:@selector(managedObjectContext)] to: [delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(managedObjectContext)] The crash was happening because you were sending the message managedObjectContext to the application delegate object, which does not respond to that message. It ...


0

What kind of view are you using for the table cell view? With view-based tables, -editColumn:row:withEvent:select: attempts to set the cell view as the first responder. If the cell view doesn't accept first responder, then it won't work. You can make the cell view accept first responder, if that makes sense for the type of view that it is. Or, you can ...


1

As of the latest RESTKit version (0.23.2) you can define the primary key like this: [_mapping addAttributeMappingsFromDictionary:@{ @"id" : @"objectId", @"name" : @"name" }]; [_mapping setIdentificationAttributes:@[ @"objectId" ]]; Whereas objectId is you primary key on the core data object.


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As of the latest RESTKit version (0.23.2) you can define the primary key like this: [_mapping addAttributeMappingsFromDictionary:@{ @"id" : @"objectId", @"name" : @"name" }]; [_mapping setIdentificationAttributes:@[ @"objectId" ]]; Whereas objectId is you primary key on the core data object.


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As of the latest RESTKit version (0.23) you can define the primary key like this: [_mapping addAttributeMappingsFromDictionary:@{ @"id" : @"objectId", @"name" : @"name" }]; [_mapping setIdentificationAttributes:@[ @"objectId" ]]; Whereas objectId is you primary key on the core data object.


1

Peculiarity with Core Data. Sending copy would just return another NSFaultingMutableSet, and Core Data is too buggy to do that right. Replace it with [NSSet setWithSet:self.cats] and you'd face lesser errors.


1

You need to create a cache. This is how RestKit searches for and finds existing objects, which is the mechanism for avoiding duplicates. There are 2 types or cache, but you usually want to use the memory cache (as opposed to the fetch cache) as it is faster. Create and set the cache with: self.managedObjectStore.managedObjectCache = ...


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Rails does not allow number as first character of model name! But! :) If you have a number in database table name, you need to just rename your model and set table_name: class CoreData::ZTwoProduct < ActiveRecord::Base establish_connection "core_data_#{Rails.env}".to_sym self.table_name = 'z_2products' end


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It works using "sqlite3-ruby" gem: 2.1.1 :088 > db = SQLite3::Database.new "db/core_data/productCoreData_development.sqlite" => #<SQLite3::Database:0x007ffb01e51f60 @tracefunc=nil, @authorizer=nil, @encoding=nil, @busy_handler=nil, @collations={}, @functions={}, @results_as_hash=nil, @type_translation=nil, @readonly=false> 2.1.1 :097 > ...


0

I found answer here, that says: Because the child does not get updated back from the parent MOC. The parent MOC will update its own instance of the NSManagedObject with a permanent ID but that change will not be pushed down to the instance of that NSManagedObject belonging to the child MOC.


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You should not, most likely cannot, reverse engineer the SQLite database that Core Data uses. Rather, you should be creating an appropriate model, entity subclasses and process the import record for record. Independent from its database implementation, Core Data does not define join tables as do relational databases; instead it uses a so-called ...


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Have a look a MagicalRecord it has built in maps from JSON to core data and will keep unique items unique.


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The Apple documentation says "The @sum operator returns the sum of the values of the property specified by the key path to the right of the operator. Each number is converted to a double, the sum of the values is computed, and the total is wrapped as an instance of NSNumber and returned." That being said, you could use "doubleValue" instead of "intValue" ...


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+keyPathsForValuesAffectingValueForKey: is part of Key-Value Observing (KVO). KVO only needs to call it if something observes a key on an instance of the class which implements it. (That includes any keys observed indirectly. For example, if something observes key "A", it will call the method for key "A". If it indicates that the value of "A" is affected by ...


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This code has serious problems. First, this line is not valid Objective-C: - (IBAction)saveSignature:(id)sender) { That last ) should not be there. This would probably explain an "expected method body" error, because you're confusing the compiler. There's no self.MySignature.image line. I'm guessing that you mean the line that assigns a value to ...


1

Is there a way to detect how much space the app has used up out of its total allocated space? Apps don't have a limit on total allocated space, they're limited by the amount of space on the device. You can find out how much space you're using for these files by using NSFileManager to scan the directories. There are several methods that do this in ...


1

Try the below to get the appropriate object in the main thread context: recordObjectID = self.inviteUser.objectID; dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{ NSManagedObjectContext *moc = self.objectManager.managedObjectStore.mainQueueManagedObjectContext;; NSError * error = nil; self.inviteUser = (User *) [moc ...


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Yes. But you need to find a way to notify that MOC about the changes you made. You can do that by using a child/parent context (parentContext), by saving to the persistentStoreCoordinator or by merging changes using mergeChangesFromContextDidSaveNotification. In any case you must save for the changes to propagate. Yes. Same as #1. You can fetch on whichever ...


0

Your section header column should be the first attribute in sort order.


0

If your model changes are such that you at least have an source and destination entity level mapping (For example you had a Vehicle entity in your old model and now you want to migrate that data to Car) then you can use a custom mapping model with a migration policy. The process is fairly straightforward, in Xcode, try to add a new mapping model file to ...


1

The error tells you what the problem is. The format you are providing is not a valid format. Specifically, there is no "not like" comparison. You have to do the "not" outside: NSPredicate(format: "not (boardID like %@)", board) As @MartinR mentioned below, you can have NSPredicate automatically escape special characters so they don't interfere with the ...


1

With the addition of modules in Xcode 6 and swift, you now have to qualify the document class type. For example, if my application name is MyApp (and I haven't created any other modules), and my document type is MyDoc, in Document Types the class should be listed as MyApp.MyDoc. I can't post screenshots of this yet because the NDA, but here are the steps ...


0

Whether you're using SQLite or not makes absolutely no difference here. Similarly, if lightweight migration is working (i.e. the store is being opened successfully) then there's really little more to say about that. Assuming you're using NSManagedObject subclasses then what you've probably not realised is that merely updating your model doesn't update the ...


0

Took me a while to figure this out. The ideal solution is to import the bridging header in the test target itself. Go in Build Settings > Swift compiler > Code Generation and give the name of your bridging header. Be careful, the test target is not selected by default. You have to select it in the scrollbar (it's located on the same line as General, info, ...


0

Your object's managed object context is nil, this is why the faults cannot be fired. Make sure you check for all attributes and the context when you obtain the user object. RestKit has many problems like this when it comes to multi-threading. In view of your copious code just to set up the "Object Manager", have you considered using plain Core Data and ...


0

Up to a few hundred records, don't worry about it. It would be indeed wonderfully "quick and dirty". Still, the learning curve for Core Data is not as steep as you might expect. Once you get the hang of it - and your simple app is great way to explore that API - you will find that you want to do everything with it. Even large projects will seem easy. ...


0

- (id)primitiveValueForKey:(NSString *)key; - (void)setPrimitiveValue:(id)value forKey:(NSString *)key; use NSNumber in place of (id)value


1

You have to cast the dictionary returned by attributesByName to the real key/value type: let attributes = managedObject.entity.attributesByName as [String: NSAttributeDescription] for attributeName in attributes.keys { // attributeName has the type String // ... } or let attributes = managedObject.entity.attributesByName as [NSString: ...


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You can explicitly give the attributeName a type like attributeName:NSString for attributeName:NSString in managedObject.entity.attributesByName.keys { attributeName.length //here attributeName will work as NSString } and note import Foundation for implicity casting between String and NSString any


0

I got similar error, and in my case, locking NSPersistentStoreCoordinator worked. [context.persistentStoreCoordinator lock]; [context performBlockAndWait:^{ // do something }]; [context.persistentStoreCoordinator unlock] I don't know why it works, but I suspect NSManagedObjectContext's bug. I hope this will help.


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for attributeName: String in managedObject.entity.attributesByName.keys { }


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You can cast the NSArray returned by an ObjC API (which turns into [AnyObject]! by default) to a typed array: for attributeName in managedObject.entity.attributesByName.keys as [String] { // ... }


1

Okay, so ready for a trip down the Core Data rabbit hole? TL;DR NSManagedObjectIDs whose persistent store coordinator is no longer in memory loose their NSEntityDescription (entity) and do not equate (isEqual: returns NO) to NSManagedObjectIDs from a different persistent store coordinator even though their URIRepresentation is the same. Down the Rabbit ...


0

This is definitely a Core Data issue and not a problem with RestKit. From the looks of it, the object you are setting either isn't the correct type, i.e., DataFetch, or the object is nil. Because you can't unwrap an Optional.none, you'll have to use a conditional setter: var dataFetch: DataFetch? var context: NSManagedObjectContext = ...


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As far as MagicalRecord is concerned here, you are dispatching a background task in the background. Basically, your queues are out of sync. I suggest you use a single background queue to save your data. Try something like this: __block dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0); __block dispatch_group_t taskGroup ...



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