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127

Others will ask you to post the code where you access a core graphics context, but I doubt that's the issue. These invalid context 0x0 error messages are common and easy to reproduce in iOS 7. In fact, I can reproduce the error using storyboard with zero code. I drag a UITextField onto the canvas in IB, run the app, and double tap inside the text field. In ...


92

If you're curious what code is causing these logs, you can set a symbolic breakpoint on CGPostError.


75

From the docs: The constants for specifying the alpha channel information are declared with the CGImageAlphaInfo type but can be passed to this parameter safely. So you can just use a cast to suppress the warning: CGBitmapInfo bitmapInfo = (CGBitmapInfo) kBitmapInfo;


29

Sometimes it is really useful to spend some time reinventing the wheel. As you might already noticed there are a lot of frameworks, but it is not that hard to implement simple, but yet useful solution without introducing all that complexity. (Please don't get me wrong, for any serious purpose it is better to use some mature and proven to be stable ...


29

I think that it's easiest to explain what is happening for each of the three locations and then a "conclusion" at the end. I'm also adding some illustrations, showing exactly the behaviour that you are mentioning in your question so that it will be easier to follow for someone who hasn't tried these three things themselves. I'm also extending the ...


28

This is actually a lot simpler then you would first think and uses animations with "no" speed (paused). Now with the paused animation added to the layer you can change the time offset to jump to a specific time within the animation. If you are not planning on running the animation by itself (i.e. only control it manually) I would suggest that you change the ...


28

These sorts of errors are historically the result of calling Core Graphics functions when not within a context that is established within drawRect or between calls like UIGraphicsBeginImageContext and UIGraphicsEndImageContext (or other UIKit functions like that which begin and end a context). Having said that, though, bilobatum is correct that this ...


25

No. In iOS6, renderInContext: is the only way. It is slow. It uses the CPU. Ways to render UIKit content renderInContext: [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()]; Requires iOS 2.0. It runs in the CPU. It doesn't capture views with non-affine transforms, OpenGL, or video content. If an animation is running, you can have the option of ...


20

This may surprise you, but you can use a UIToolbar, which already includes that standard effect (only iOS 7+). In you view controller's viewDidLoad: self.view.opaque = NO; // Not really sure if needed self.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor]; // Be sure in fact that EVERY background in your view's hierarchy is totally or at least partially ...


19

I'll try to answer your question at a conceptual, 20,000ft level. I will try to disclaim my points where I'm over-generalizing, but I'll attempt to hit the common case. Perhaps the easiest way to think about it is this: In the GPU's memory you have textures which, for the purposes of this discussion, are bitmap images. A CALayer might have a texture ...


19

Edit FWIW: This answer serves its educational purpose by explaining what CGPathAddArcToPoint(...) does for you. I would highly recommend that you read through it as it will help you understand and appreciate the CGPath API. Then you should go ahead and use that, as seen in an0's answer, instead of this code when you round edges in your app. This code should ...


17

I am using FXBlurView which works great on iOS5+ https://github.com/nicklockwood/FXBlurView CocoaPods: -> FXBlurView (1.3.1) UIView subclass that replicates the iOS 7 realtime background blur effect, but works on iOS 5 and above. pod 'FXBlurView', '~> 1.3.1' - Homepage: http://github.com/nicklockwood/FXBlurView - Source: ...


16

AddArcToPoint works like this: where P1 is the point the path is currently at, r is the radius given to the function, and the red line is the line that addArcToPoint will draw. It won't draw to the second point at x2, y2 it will stop at the end of the arc. I have a blog post about this here.


16

I had this problem with a simple UITextField (keyboard not showing up and many different invalid context error messages on the console). I just find a workaround by looking to another problem on SO: Cannot find executable for CFBundle CertUIFramework.axbundle Just do: click on iOS Simulator > Reset Content and Settings... and run again. The problem ...


12

Try set backgroungcolor property to transparent color self.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor]


12

CGContextAddArc does this: where the red line is what will be drawn, sA is startAngle, eA is the endAngle, r is radius, and x and y are x and y. If you have a previous point the function will line from this point to the start of the arc (unless you are careful this line won't be going in the same direction as the arc). CGContextAddArcToPoint works like ...


10

You don't "own" the Core Foundation objects startColor, endColor because they were not returned by a function that has "Create" or "Copy" in its name (compare "The Create Rule" in the "Memory Management Programming Guide for Core Foundation". And because you don't own the objects, you must not "transfer the ownership" to ARC with CFBridgingRelease(). So ...


10

CGRect rect = CGRectMake( 5, 5, 40, 30 ); NSString* rectAsString = NSStringFromCGRect( rect ); CGRect original = CGRectFromString( rectAsString ); What do you think about this way to store CGRect dates?


10

Same solution, but just to remind you: You can define the shadow directly in the storyboard. Ex:


9

Since CICircularWrap is not supported on iOS, one has to code his own effect for now. Probably the simplest way is to compute the transformation from polar to cartesian coordinate systems and then interpolate from the source image. I've come up with this simple (and frankly quite slow - it can be much optimised) algorithm: #import ...


9

Your image.size isn't valid, so UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions isn't creating a graphics context. Both image.size.width must be positive, finite numbers. Possibly image itself is nil. When you send the size message to nil, you get back CGSizeZero.


8

You're setting the corner radius on the layer property of the animation object; this animation object doesn't have a layer property. You need to set the corner radius on the layer of the thing you're animating, in this case OpenNoteVisible. You also need to ensure the toValue of the animation object matches the value you're setting on the layer, otherwise ...


7

With UIView animations, Core Animation computes the shortest path between the initial transform and the final transform. The 360° rotation doesn't work because the final transform is the same as the initial transform. For what it's worth, I've just tried the following code which makes four 90° rotations smoothly with no delay between rotations: - ...


7

I'd suggest adding a shape layer to the UILabel. Something like this: // Create the shape layer CAShapeLayer *circleLayer = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, 50, 50)]; circleLayer.fillColor = [UIColor clearColor]; circleLayer.strokeColor = [UIColor whiteColor]; circleLayer.lineWidth = 1; // Add it do your label's layer hierarchy ...


7

Your data set is rather large here. Think about it after the images are decompressed: 1136 height x 640 width x 4 bytes per pixel x 110 images = 320MB. Unfortunately, image decompression is not fast/free, so if you want this to happen at 50Hz, you're going to have to play some tricks. For starters, you probably won't be able to keep all 110 images in memory ...


6

You should multiply the crop rect by the image scale. From my experience, it's unnecessary to use any different image initilization. - (UIImage *)_cropImage:(UIImage *)image withRect:(CGRect)cropRect { cropRect = CGRectMake(cropRect.origin.x * image.scale, cropRect.origin.y * image.scale, ...


6

Best of both worlds, use UIImage's drawAtPoint: or drawInRect: while still specifying your custom context: UIGraphicsPushContext(context); [image drawAtPoint:CGPointZero]; // UIImage will handle all especial cases! UIGraphicsPopContext(); Also you avoid modifying your context with CGContextTranslateCTM or CGContextScaleCTM which the second answer does.


6

You can use SKShapeNode to draw shapes in sprite kit, but each SKShapeNode is limited to one line color (strokeColor) and one fill color. However, you can create a custom SKNode subclass that contains two SKShapeNodes as children, each with different strokeColors/fillColors. Something like this will work for a custom SKNode that draws a square with left ...


6

Here i put logic of both Crop and resize image, use it as per your requirement. For Get Cropped Image: UIImage *croppedImg = nil; CGRect cropRect = CGRectMake(AS YOu Need); // set frame as you need croppedImg = [self croppIngimageByImageName:self.imageView.image toRect:cropRect]; The following method that return UIImage (as You want size of image) - ...


6

That's controlled by your line join style, not your line cap style. CGContextSetLineJoin(context, kCGLineJoinRound); The default line join style is miter, and it looks like you're hitting the miter limit, which is why it becomes round at some angle. (See CGContextSetMiterLimit).



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