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I created a useful helper for handling images by pixel. It basically creates an RGBA image context, copies the image into it (so that we can work with the image data as it's jpeg or something), and gets the raw data buffer of it. This is the class I made: public final class RGBAPixels { static let bitmapInfo = CGBitmapInfo.ByteOrder32Little.rawValue | ...


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CIPhotoEffectMono doesn't support kCIInputIntensityKey. In fact none of the photo effect filters have any inputs apart from input image. If you remove filter!.setValue(0.3, forKey: kCIInputIntensityKey) your code should work fine. You can check the supported inputs of a filter with filter.inputKeys which returns an array of strings containing the names of ...


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I wrote a demo (iPad) project that lets you apply most supported CIFilters. It interrogates each filter for the parameters it needs and has built-in support for float values as well as points and colors. For the bump distortion filter it lets you select a center point, a radius, and an input scale. The project is called CIFilterTest. You can download the ...


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The GPUImage processing library can give you some up-sampling and possibly lead to your Laplacian Pyramid. pod 'GPUImage' SHARPEN UPSAMPLING: UIImage *inputImage = [UIImage imageNamed:@"cutelady"]; GPUImagePicture *stillImageSource = [[GPUImagePicture alloc]initWithImage:inputImage]; GPUImageSharpenFilter *stillImageFilter = [[GPUImageSharpenFilter alloc] ...


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All NSObject subclasses conform to Equatable, and the == function calls the isEqual: method on the objects. The isEqual: method of NSObject simply compares the object pointers, i.e. o1 == o2 holds if o1 and o2 refer the same object instance. See for example Interacting with Objective-C APIs: Swift provides default implementations of the == and === ...


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If you want to set just one pixel, you can create a small color kernel that compares a passed target coordinate with the current coordinate and colors the output appropriately. For example: let kernel = CIColorKernel(string: "kernel vec4 setPixelColorAtCoord(__sample pixel, vec2 targetCoord, vec4 targetColor)" + "{" + " return int(targetCoord.x) =...


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This effect looks a lot like the Kuwahara noise reduction filter. It's implemented in the GPUImage framework. https://github.com/BradLarson/GPUImage


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Here's an approach: use UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext to generate a UIImage, apply the filter to that and overlay an image view containing the filtered image over your original component. Here's a way to do that with a blur (taken from my blog): Getting a blurred representation of a UIView is pretty simple: I need to begin an image context, ...



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