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1

Your method of signaling the consumer to terminate is fine and is in harmony with what you would do if using a multiprocessing or threaded Queue. However, generators also have a way to throw Exceptions (rather than sending values) and the purpose of throw is precisely to signal events or changes in state to the generator. Moreover, when an exception is ...


3

Because low_level is a coroutine, it can only be used by running an asyncio event loop. If you want to be able to call it from synchronous code that isn't running an event loop, you have to provide a wrapper that actually launches an event loop and runs the coroutine until completion: def sync_low_level(): loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() ...


4

The memory for var is still being used while insert executes, but the get function itself is "frozen", which allows other functions to execute. Tornado's coroutines are implemented using Python generators, which allow function execution to be temporarily suspended when a yield occurs, and then be restarted again (with the function's state preserved) after ...


0

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() for signame in ('SIGINT', 'SIGTERM'): loop.add_signal_handler(getattr(signal, signame), asyncio.async, ask_exit(signame)) That way the signal causes your ask_exit to get scheduled in a task.


0

Since there have been a number of comments asking how to implement the wait function that would make deft_code's example work, I've decided to write a possible implementation. The general idea is that we have a scheduler with a list of coroutines, and the scheduler decides when to return control to the coroutines after they give up control with their wait ...



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