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31

Above example is not Co-related Sub-Query. It is Derived Table / Inline-View since i.e, a Sub-query within FROM Clause. A Corelated Sub-query should refer its parent(main Query) Table in it. For example See find the Nth max salary by Co-related Sub-query: SELECT Salary FROM Employee E1 WHERE N-1 = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Employee E2 ...


12

You can use the PIVOT function to get the result, I would just apply the row_number() windowing function to the data so you can return multiple rows for each ID2: select id2, start, stop from ( select id2, status, time, row_number() over(partition by status order by time) seq from yourtable ) d pivot ( max(time) for status ...


10

One option is to put the subquery in a LEFT JOIN: select sum ( t.graduates ) - t1.summedGraduates from table as t left join ( select sum ( graduates ) summedGraduates, id from table where group_code not in ('total', 'others' ) group by id ) t1 on t.id = t1.id where t.group_code = 'total' group by ...


9

Correlated Subquery is a sub-query that uses values from the outer query. In this case the inner query has to be executed for every row of outer query. See example here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Correlated_subquery Simple subquery doesn't use values from the outer query and is being calculated only once: SELECT id, first_name FROM student_details ...


8

SELECT Country, AllStates = STUFF((SELECT ', ' + State FROM Country_State_Mapping b WHERE b.Country = a.Country FOR XML PATH('')), 1, 2, '') FROM Country_State_Mapping a GROUP BY Country


6

I'm not sure why Peter is using a Min(owner) analytic function instead of first_value(owner). I believe the latter gives you what you need while the min(owner) is giving you the "minimum" owner. Everything else in the query I agree with: Select Distinct acc_num From ( Select acc_num, owner, first_value(owner) Over ...


6

There is no practical threshold. It depends on what your command timeout is set to on your connection. Keep in mind that the time it takes to delete all of these rows is contingent upon: The time it takes to find the rows of interest The time it takes to log the transaction in the transaction log The time it takes to delete the index entries of ...


6

I think you can use this approach: SELECT b.row_id , b.x , b.y , b.something , a.x , a.y FROM my_table b left join my_table a on a.row_id = (b.row_id - 1) and a.something != 42


6

Here is the query written using the Zend_Db OO interface. The key was mostly using some Zend_Db_Expr objects for the subquery and COUNT function. $ss = $db->select() ->from(array('p' => 'forum_topic_posts'), new Zend_Db_Expr('COUNT(p.post_id) - 1')) ->where('f.topic_id = p.topic_id'); $s = $db->select() ...


6

You have a correlated subquery. This is a bit different from a non-correlated subquery, because it can include references to outer tables. When using correlated subqueries, always use the table aliases for all table references. This is a good idea in general, but should be followed more attentively for correlated subqueries. AND SGBSTDN_TERM_CODE_EFF = ...


6

You do not need a PIVOT query to get the information you are needing. You can perform the following: SELECT mt1.ID2, mt1.time AS start, ( SELECT TOP 1 mt2.time FROM MyTable AS mt2 WHERE mt2.status = 'stop' AND mt2.time >= mt1.time ORDER BY mt2.time ) AS stop FROM MyTable AS mt1 WHERE mt1.status = 'start' If you are performing the ...


5

You need to use OUTER APPLY. A CROSS Apply is like an INNER JOIN where the applied table must return results, whereas an OUTER Apply is like a [LEFT] OUTER JOIN where the applied subquery may return no results. SELECT c.Name As CompanyName, j.ID as JobID, j.Title as JobTitle, ja.ApplicationDate, DATEDIFF(MONTH,ja.ApplicationDate, GETDATE()) AS ...


5

For the purposes of a demo I've added EffDate to both tables. Hopefully that matches your model and demonstrates this kind of join appropriately. DetachedCriteria subQuery = DetachedCriteria .For<PersonDetails>("pd") .SetProjection(Projections.Max("pd.EffDate")) .Add(Restrictions.EqProperty("pd.PersonId", "p.PersonId")); IList results = ...


5

If the delete will remove "a significant number" of rows from the table, this can be an alternative to a DELETE: put the records to keep somewhere else, truncate the original table, put back the 'keepers'. Something like: SELECT * INTO #cats_to_keep FROM cats WHERE cats.id_cat NOT IN ( -- note the NOT SELECT owner_cats.id_cat FROM owner_cats WHERE ...


5

Given: public class Order { public virtual int OrderId {get; set;} public virtual DateTime OrderDate {get; set;} public virtual IList<LineItem> LineItems {get; set;} } public class LineItem { public virtual int Id {get; set;} public virtual string Description {get; set;} } To query a projection of Order + Aggregated LineItem ...


5

As to whether the sub-query runs twice, use EXPLAIN PLAN. I like to use the merge command instead of update for these correlated updates, something like: (Not tested, if you want a tested answer, please provide DDL and insert statements.) merge into table_a TRGT using (select P.prov_id, N.enc_id, trunc(n.note_time) as trunc_note_time from note N ...


4

You can only correlate one level deep. Use: SELECT m.nom, m.prenom, x.categories, y.areas FROM m3allens m LEFT JOIN (SELECT m2c.m3allem_id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT c.category_en) AS categories FROM CATEGORIES c JOIN m3allems_to_categories m2c ON m2c.category_id = c.id ...


4

from item in Inventory where item.ProductNumber == 1000000390 where item.ParentAccountNumber == (from subitem in Inventory where subitem.AccountNumber == 27748 select subitem.ParentAccountNumber).First() select item Something like that? You can replace subitem.AccountNumber == ...


4

I don't see what you need the dbms_random.value() for, but the following query using analytic functions should give you the expected result: Select Distinct acc_num From ( Select acc_num, owner, First_Value(owner) Over ( Partition By acc_num Order By a_date Desc, b_date Desc, c_date Desc ...


4

Have you tried no Subquery and use a join instead? DELETE cats FROM cats c INNER JOIN owner_cats oc on c.id_cat = oc.id_cat WHERE id_owner =1 And if you have have you also tried different Join hints e.g. DELETE cats FROM cats c INNER HASH JOIN owner_cats oc on c.id_cat = oc.id_cat WHERE id_owner =1


4

If you use an EXISTS rather than an IN, you should get much better performance. Try this: DELETE FROM cats c WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM owner_cats o WHERE o.id_cat = c.id_cat AND o.id_owner = 1)


4

Maybe I'm missing something, but the solution using a CASE does work for aggregates as well: SELECT st.name, avg(CASE WHEN g.score < 65 THEN g.score ELSE NULL END) as F, avg(CASE WHEN g.score >= 65 AND g.score < 70 THEN g.score ELSE NULL END) as D, avg(CASE WHEN g.score >= 70 AND g.score < 80 THEN g.score ELSE NULL END) ...


4

Edit Now with running sum of contacts. My first draft used new contacts per month, which is obviously not what OP wants. WITH c AS ( SELECT created_at ,count(id) OVER (order BY created_at) AS ct FROM contacts ), p AS ( SELECT date_trunc('month', created_at) AS month ,sum(score) AS points_sum FROM points GROUP ...


4

GROUP BY can be omitted in this case, because there is only (one) aggregate function(s) in the SELECT list and all rows are guaranteed to belong to the same group of cust_id ( by the WHERE clause). The aggregation will be over all rows with matching cust_id in both cases. So both queries are correct. This would be a cleaner another way to implement the ...


4

That works as expected, due to the correlation between ColumnA in the inner query to the outer. This commonly used correlated query pattern is valid DELETE TableA WHERE NOT EXISTS (select * from TableB where TableB.ID=TableA.ID) It removes TableA entries that don't have a dependent record in TableB. It shows that you can reference TableA columns in a ...


4

You are trying to access the Item.idItem inside of the subquery but it is not available there. You should use something like this: SELECT Item.idDish, Item.dateAdded, Item.dateModified, Item.fidLocation, Item.category, Item.description, Item.price, Item.name, Item.fullImageName, Item.thumbnailImageName, ...


4

In SQL Server you can borrow the idea from this answer ;WITH XMLNAMESPACES('http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance' as ns) SELECT * FROM Analytics WHERE (SELECT Analytics.* FOR xml path('row'), elements xsinil, type ).value('count(//*[local-name() != "colToIgnore"]/@ns:nil)', 'int') > 0 SQL Fiddle Likely constructing a query with ...


4

Trying to explain why it doesn't work as you expect: I would expect the subquery to be executed for each row because I'm referencing t1. It is executed and it can affect all rows. But an UPDATE stetement is one statement and it is executed as one statement that affects a whole table (or a part of it if you have a WHERE clause). Each time the ...


3

Select DistrictHnd, PartyHnd, CandidateName, TotalVotes From ElectionResults As ER Where TotalVotes = ( Select Max(ER1.TotalVotes) From ElectionResults As ER1 Where ER1.DistrictHnd = ER.DistrictHnd ) In this query, if there is a tie (two people in the same district with the ...


3

This is a variation of the greatest-n-per-group problem that comes up frequently. You want the single row form FinishTierPrice (call it p1), matching the FinishOption and with the greatest Qty, but still less than or equal to the Qty of the ProductOptionTier. One way to do this is to try to match a second row (p2) from FinishTierPrice that would have the ...



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