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8

You could work on the matrix, which is easier: res <- cor(iris[,-5]) res[lower.tri(res)] <- NA #assuming there are no actual NAs already # which seems likely with complete.obs #use lower.tri(res, diag = TRUE) to remove the diagonal too na.omit(reshape2::melt(res)) # Var1 Var2 value #1 Sepal.Length ...


3

That is because one of the images is black or includes a single color, meaning that all the values of the matrix are similar. Check the following examples: I = imread('pout.tif'); J = I*0; % create a black image R = corr2(I,J); R = NaN I = imread('pout.tif'); J = 255*ones(size(I)); % create a white image R = corr2(I,J); R ...


3

This would let you pass a single grouping factor to your helper function. Does require using group_by_ since I extract the name from the formula as a character but then coerce back it to a name: grouped_cor_ <- function(data, x, y, form){ x <- lazyeval::as.lazy(x) y <- lazyeval::as.lazy(y); fac <- as.name(as.character(form)[2]) cor1 <- ...


2

Your job is time consuming : roughly one second for each sample in SELECT. Vectorizing will not give you a big improvement, because the time consuming corr function is in the inner loop. You can however have a more light code, pandas is not strictly necessary here. As an exemple: VALUE=random((2812,5,5)) select=pd.DataFrame(randint(0,5,(10,2))) .... for ...


2

Using this formula of corellation you cannot avoid all the nested queries even if you use over(). The thing is that you cannot use both group by and over in the same query and also you can not have nested aggregation functions e.g. sum(x - avg(x)). So you in best case scenario, according to your data, you will need to keep at least the with. Your code will ...


2

If you are familiar with python I'd use pandas. It uses "DataFrames" similarly to R, so you could take the concept and apply it to R. Assuming your data1 is a delimited file formatted like this: GeneName | ExpValue | gene1 300.0 gene2 250.0 Then you can do this to get each data type into a DataFrame: dfblood = ...


1

So basically for this we need to know the cutoff value. By writing acf and stats:::plot.acf you can see that it might be different for different parameter values, but for default values here is what you should use: set.seed(123) x <- arima.sim(list(ar = 0.5), 100) r <- acf(x, plot = FALSE)$acf which(abs(r)[-1] >= qnorm(1 - 0.05 / 2) / ...


1

You could do a two step approach: #starting from: x <- melt(cor(x,method="pearson",use="complete.obs")) #subset first the variable 3 when it is equal to 1 x <- subset(x, V3 != 1) #remove duplicate entries in that same variable x[duplicated(x$V3),] V1 V2 V3 5 VarB VarA 0.001 8 VarC VarA -0.002 9 VarC VarB 0.003


1

You can use apply: m <- matrix(runif(571 * 146), 571, 146) apply(m, 1, function(mRow) cor(mRow[1:73], mRow[74:146]) This results in a vector of length 571 whihc gives you all the correlations.


1

That's not how any of these functions work. You can't simply pass a large number of vectors to each. Take a look at the help files for each function (? hist, ? barplot, ? cor) to see what is possible. cor() expects a matrix as its first argument hist() expects a single vector as its first argument barplot() expects a vector of heights (not a raw vector) as ...


1

Assuming you're working with time series data since you called out a "forecast". I think what you're really looking for is backtesting of your forecast model. From Ruey S. Tsay's "An Introduction to Analysis of Financial Data with R", you might want to take a look at his backtest.R function. backtest(m1,rt,orig,h,xre=NULL,fixed=NULL,inc.mean=TRUE) # m1: ...



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