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64

If you are using python 2.7+/3.1+, there is a Counter Class in the collections module which is purpose built to solve this type of problem: >>> from collections import Counter >>> words = "apple banana apple strawberry banana lemon" >>> freqs = Counter(words.split()) >>> print(freqs) Counter({'apple': 2, 'banana': 2, ...


52

Python 3.x does have reduce, you just have to do a from functools import reduce. It also has "dict comprehensions", which have exactly the syntax in your example. Python 2.7 and 3.x also have a Counter class which does exactly what you want: from collections import Counter cnt = Counter("abracadabra") In Python 2.6 or earlier, I'd personally use a ...


49

defaultdict to the rescue! from collections import defaultdict words = "apple banana apple strawberry banana lemon" d = defaultdict(int) for word in words.split(): d[word] += 1 This runs in O(n).


33

You could use grep -o then pipe through wc -l: $ echo "123 123 123" | grep -o 123 | wc -l 3


24

Thread.sleep can throw an InterruptedException which is a checked exception. All checked exceptions must either be caught and handled or else you must declare that your method can throw it. You need to do this whether or not the exception actually will be thrown. Not declaring a checked exception that your method can throw is a compile error. You either ...


23

from collections import Counter most_common,num_most_common = Counter(L).most_common(1)[0] # 4, 6 times For older Python versions (< 2.7), you can use this receipe to get the Counter class.


21

One pass through the list, and no extra data structures constructed: def zot(bs): n, s = len(bs), sum(bs) return 1 if n == s else 2 if s else 0


20

There's always this method: n = 1; if (i >= 100000000){i /= 100000000; n += 8;} if (i >= 10000){i /= 10000; n += 4;} if (i >= 100){i /= 100; n += 2;} if (i >= 10){i /= 10; n += 1;}


19

True is equal to 1. >>> sum([True, True, False, False, False, True]) 3


18

readdir is not as expensive as you may think. The knack is avoid stat'ing each file, and (optionally) sorting the output of ls. /bin/ls -1U | wc -l avoids aliases in your shell, doesn't sort the output, and lists 1 file-per-line (not strictly necessary when piping the output into wc). The original question can be rephrased as "does the data structure of a ...


18

I don't know, and the answer may well be different depending on how your individual language is implemented. So, stress test it! Implement all three solutions. Run them on 1 through 1,000,000 (or some other huge set of numbers that's representative of the numbers the solution will be running against) and time how long each of them takes. Pit your ...


18

I would suggest using any and all. I would say that the benefit of this is readability rather than cleverness or efficiency. For example: >>> vals0 = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0] >>> vals1 = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1] >>> vals2 = [0, 1, 0, 1, 0] >>> def category(vals): ... if all(vals): ... return 1 ... elif any(vals): ... ...


15

Somebody mentioned code golf, so can't resist a variation on @senderle's: [0,2,1][all(vals) + any(vals)] Short explanation: This uses the boolean values as their integer equivalents to index a list of desired responses. If all is true then any must also be true, so their sum is 2. any by itself gives 1 and no matches gives 0. These indices return the ...


14

int numTransitions(int a) { int b = a >> 1; // sign-extending shift properly counts bits at the ends int c = a ^ b; // xor marks bits that are not the same as their neighbors on the left return CountBits(c); // count number of set bits in c } For an efficient implementation of CountBits see ...


14

Here's the perl code. Counting words can be somewhat subjective, but I just say it's any string of characters that isn't whitespace. open(FILE, "<file.txt") or die "Could not open file: $!"; my ($lines, $words, $chars) = (0,0,0); while (<FILE>) { $lines++; $chars += length($_); $words += scalar(split(/\s+/, $_)); } ...


14

Here it is the updated version of the algorithm based on the newer paper: var pow_2_32 = 0xFFFFFFFF + 1; function HyperLogLog(std_error) { function log2(x) { return Math.log(x) / Math.LN2; } function rank(hash, max) { var r = 1; while ((hash & 1) == 0 && r <= max) { ++r; hash ...


14

This can easily be accomplished with a regular expression. function countDigits( $str ) { return preg_match_all( "/[0-9]/", $str ); } The function will return the amount of times the pattern was found, which in this case is any digit.


13

For arbitrary-length integers, bin(n).count("1") is the fastest I could find in pure Python. I tried adapting Óscar's and Adam's solutions to process the integer in 64-bit and 32-bit chunks, respectively. Both were at least ten times slower than bin(n).count("1") (the 32-bit version took about half again as much time). On the other hand, gmpy popcount() ...


12

C#, 153: Reads in the file at p and prints results to the console: File.ReadLines(p) .SelectMany(s=>s.Split(' ')) .GroupBy(w=>w) .OrderBy(g=>-g.Count()) .Take(10) .ToList() .ForEach(g=>Console.WriteLine(g.Count()+"|"+g.Key)); If merely producing the list but not printing to the console, it's 93 characters. 6|DIES ...


11

What you tried was to overload an operator for scalar types. C++ doesn't allow you to do that except for enumerations (beside the point that operator= has to be a member). At least one of the types has to be a user defined type. Thus, what you want to do is to wrap the raw pointer into a user defined class, which overloads constructor, copy constructor, copy ...


11

A shorter shell version: xargs -n1 < input.txt | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head If you want case insensitive ranking, change uniq -c into uniq -ci. Slightly shorter still, if you're happy about the rank being reversed and readability impaired by lack of spaces. This clocks in at 46 characters: xargs -n1<input.txt|sort|uniq -c|sort -n|tail (You ...


11

In your particular example you could read the number as a string and count the number of characters. But for the general case, you can do it your way or you can use a base-10 logarithm. Here is the logarithm example: #include <iostream> #include <cmath> using namespace std; int main() { double n; cout << "Enter a number: "; ...


11

Use a hash to count the number of times each name occurs: use warnings; use strict; use Data::Dumper; $Data::Dumper::Sortkeys=1; my @names = qw(bob mike joe bob); my %counts; $counts{$_}++ for @names; print Dumper(\%counts); __END__ $VAR1 = { 'bob' => 2, 'joe' => 1, 'mike' => 1 };


11

I stripped the trailing and leading spaces from your text-formatted data and created an equivalent sample schema using SQL Fiddle. The setup looks like this: CREATE TABLE Grades (`htno` int, `sub` varchar(1), `marks` int, `credits` int) ; INSERT INTO Grades (`htno`, `sub`, `marks`, `credits`) VALUES (1, 'a', 15, 0), (1, 'b', 10, 0), (1, ...


11

There is currently no API for the hashtags feature on Facebook {edit: there was however a public posts search function which will return some public posts with a certain hashtag if you use that hashtag as the search string in API version 1.0 - there is no equivalent in version 2.0 onwards It ignores the # symbol in the matching though, so a search for ...


10

SELECT foo, count(bar) FROM mytable GROUP BY bar ORDER BY count(bar) DESC; The group by statement tells aggregate functions to group the result set by a column. In this case "group by bar" says count the number of fields in the bar column, grouped by the different "types" of bar. A better explanation is here: http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_groupby.asp ...


10

Hint: use substr() in your recursion. Also, you have two base cases. One of them has three issues: it has a syntax error in it; it relies on being able to compute the length of the string (which is what your function is supposed to do); it is unnecessary given that you have the other base case.


10

The main difference is that irange is a random-access range while counting_range isn't. counting_range is based on Boost.Iterator's counting_iterator which uses all the underlying integers operations directly. Integers in C++ almost fit the iterator concept: the only thing missing is an operator*. counting_iterator provides an operator* as an identity ...


9

retain -- is done on the created object, it just increase the reference count. copy -- create a new object


9

Conversion of pure code to monadic code can be tricky, hopefully these tips can give you the right idea: Pick a monad. You could also use writer on the Sum monoid, but you may find the state-based code more straight-forward. Consider all of the expressions in your code: which expressions could cause the state variable to increment? ins makes a comparison, ...



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