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29

The problem is that the characters you are using cannot be represented in the encoding you have the file set to (Cp1252). The way I see it, you essentially have two options: Option 1. Change the encoding. According to IBM, you should set the encoding to UTF-8. I believe this would solve your problem. Set the global text file encoding preference ...


15

Go to: "Windows > Preferences > General > Content Types > Text > {Choose file type} {Selected file type} > Default encoding > UTF-8" and click Update.


9

It can be solved by setting encoding in eclipse: 1st way: At the menu select File-->Properties and then at the "Text file encoding" section: Select Other radio, Select UTF-8 from combo -> Lastly click OK button 2nd way: Right click on specific file (say Test.java) -> Properties. In Text file encoding section: Select Other radio, Select UTF-8 from combo ...


7

CP1252 cannot represent ā; your input contains the similar character â. repr just displays an ASCII representation of a unicode string in Python 2.x: >>> print(repr(b'J\xe2nis'.decode('cp1252'))) u'J\xe2nis' >>> print(b'J\xe2nis'.decode('cp1252')) Jânis


6

If ISO-8859-1 is close enough, there is a special shortcut to convert ISO-8859-1-bytes-in-code-units to Unicode characters, due to the simple byte=code-point mapping: var chars= decodeURIComponent(escape(bytes)); For any other encoding there is no built-in functionality; you would have to include your own lookup tables. For example: var encodings= { ...


6

It's pretty straightforward: public String convert(String s) { return new String(s.getBytes("Windows-1252"), "Windows-1250"); } Note that System.out.print() can introduce another incorrect conversion due to mismatch between ANSI and OEM code pages. However System.console().writer().print() should output it correctly.


6

Tools hard-coding for code page 1252 on Windows is very unlikely. Much more likely is that it happens to be the default code page on your machine. 1252 is used in Western Europe and the Americas. It is configured in Control Panel, Regional and Language options. They've been using different names for it, on Win7 it is in the Administrative tab, Change ...


5

Six years old and still relevant: The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!) Now, about your question: Yes, there are still tools out there that choke on UTF-8 files. But more and more tools are "getting it". If you're developing your own stuff, you might want to look into ...


5

Strings are represented within the JVM as Unicode. When you write it out, you need to convert it to an appropriate character set. To do this, use an OutputStreamWriter and specify the Charset. OutputStreamWriter writer = new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(file, true), "windows-1252"); ...


5

The notation u'\uf04a' denotes the Unicode codepoint U+F04A, which is by definition a private use codepoint. This means that the Unicode standard does not assign any character to it, and never will; instead, it can be used by private agreements. It is thus meaningless to talk about printing it. If there is a private agreement on using it in some context, ...


5

This can be tricky simply changing the "advertised" encoding does not make up for the fact that there are bytes in the file that cannot be understood using a UTF-8 interpretation. In Ant you will need to update the javac task to add an encoding like, <javac ... encoding="utf-8"> Make sure that the file encoding in Eclipse is also UTF-8 because some ...


4

Position 0x81 is unassigned in Windows-1252 (aka cp1252). It is assigned to U+0081 HIGH OCTET PRESET (HOP) control character in Latin-1 (aka ISO 8859-1). I can reproduce your error in Python 3.1 like this: >>> b'\x81'.decode('cp1252') Traceback (most recent call last): ... UnicodeDecodeError: 'charmap' codec can't decode byte 0x81 in position ...


4

One thing that needs correcting is that if your regular expression and/or input data is encoded in UTF-8 (which in this case it is, since it comes straight from inside a UTF-8 encoded file) you must use the u modifier for your regular expression. Another issue is that the copyright character should not be used as a delimiter in UTF-8 because the PCRE ...


4

Use the chr() function to convert a character code to a string: for ($i = 128; $i < 256; $i++) { $cp1252 .= chr($i); }


4

Every time you do String.getBytes(), you implicitly use your platform default encoding to transform chars to bytes. If the String contains characters that can't be represented using your platform's default encoding, you lose information. So use an explicit encoding supporting every character on earth, like UTF8: string.getBytes("UTF8"). Similarly, when you ...


4

The regex [^ -~] will match anything except printing ASCII characters. It should be able to find your stray non-ASCII character. Use it with IDLE's Search dialogue (Ctrl + F, or Edit → Find); it can search by regex:


4

Try re-encoding it as a utf-8 file: > library(foreign) > read.spss('persona.sav', reencode='utf-8')


4

The 'Core 14' PDF fonts don't know of 'CP1252' encoding (nor of 'ISO-8859-1'). They use their own encodings and encoding names, called: StandardEncoding, MacRomanEncoding, WinAnsiEncoding and PDFDocEncoding (where the WinAnsiEncoding largely maps to CP1252). The font metric files you linked to are all for the Extended Roman character set (except the two ...


4

cp1252 is the default encoding on English installations of MS Windows (what Microsoft refers to as ANSI). Java by default will take the system locale as its default character encoding. What this means is system dependent. In general I don't like to rely on default encodings. If I know my text will be pure ASCII I ignore it - otherwise I set the encoding ...


3

CP1252 and UTF-8 are the same for all characters < 128. They differ above that. So if you stick to English and stay away from diacritical marks these will be the same. Most of the Windows tools will use whatever is set as the current user's current codepage, which will default to 1252 for US Windows. You can change that to another codepage pretty ...


3

That value is, on Windows at least, the legacy codepage used for non-Unicode text. It's what the OS converts strings to and from when you use the old ANSI APIs. For any newer program it should have no effect (that being said, I still see enough programs that use the A and not the W variants of API functions, sadly). For you Java program none of that should ...


3

This fixed it. $ LANG="en_US.CP1252" $ wget -qO- "tetristv.com/zapni.tv.php" 261&session=NTk1NTg0ODU5OA==&stream=play</a></b><br>#EXTINF:0,Oèko<br><b><a This also works wget -qO- "tetristv.com/zapni.tv.php" | iconv -f cp1252


3

Either change your encoding to one which will cope, e.g. UTF-8, or find the relevant Unicode number and use a \uxxxx escape sequence to represent it.


3

You can read and write text data in any encoding that you wish. Here's a quick code example: public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { // List all supported encodings for (String cs : Charset.availableCharsets().keySet()) System.out.println(cs); File file = new File("SomeWindowsFile.txt"); StringBuilder builder = ...


3

If the file names as well as content is a problem, the easiest way to solve the problem is setting the locale on the Linux machine to something based on ISO-8859-1 rather than UTF-8. You can use locale -a to list available locales. For example if you have en_US.iso88591 you could use: export LANG=en_US.iso88591 This way Java will use ISO-8859-1 for file ...


3

The 'Text file encoding' field on the 'Preferences > General > Workspace' page only shows the most common encodings in the drop-down. However you can type in other encodings in to field. Any encoding that is supported by the Java Charset class is accepted. The Windows 'CP-125x' encodings are called 'windows-125x' by Charset. The same applies to file ...


3

As deceze commented there is no reliable way automatically detect encoding of a text. Most encodings try to use 1 byte for characters, as result same sequence of bytes mean totally different string in different encodings. Pretty much the only thing you can reliably do is to say that "it is not valid UTF8 string", other frequently used encodings do not even ...


3

u'\uf04a' already is a Unicode object, which means there's nothing to decode. The only thing you can do with it is encode it, if you're targeting a specific file encoding like UTF-8 (which is not the same as Unicode, but is confused with it all the time). u'\uf04a'.encode("utf-8") gives you a string (Python 2) or bytes object (Python 3) which you can ...


2

You should use "Cp1252" as code page instead of "CP-1252" public void convert(){ try { byte[] cp1252 = new byte[]{(byte) 0xB5}; byte[] utf8= new String(cp1252, "Cp1252").getBytes("UTF-8"); } catch (Exception ex) { System.out.println(ex.getMessage()); } } Java supported encodings As pointed out 0xB5 you are trying to ...


2

You're inspecting the value. From IRB: $ irb >> "\x8A" => "\212" This is the same as: >> puts "\x8A".inspect "\212" => nil Instead you have to print the value: >> puts "\x8A" � => nil My terminal displays "�" because 0x8A is an invalid sequence in UTF-8 (my terminal's encoding). If I change my terminal to CP-1252 it ...



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