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6

No, Haswell still only speculates along the predicted side of a branch. The branch unit on port0 can only execute predicted not-taken branches, as you can see from Agner Fog's instruction tables. This speeds up execution of a big chain of compare-and-branch where most of them are not-taken. This is not unusual in compiler-generated code. See David Kanter'...


5

Check Software optimization resources by Agner Fog, http://www.agner.org/optimize/ BTB should be in "The microarchitecture of Intel, AMD and VIA CPUs: An optimization guide for assembly programmers and compiler makers", http://www.agner.org/optimize/microarchitecture.pdf 3.7 Branch prediction in Intel Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge BTB organization. ...


5

You are probably wondering why the numbers don't line up with the addresses, as in the direct mapped case. What is going on in this diagram is that the items are placed into the sets left to right, that is all, because the sets are initially empty. The values 2, 0, 10 and 8 map to the leftmost set. The 2 appears first so it is in the leftmost column. Then 0 ...


4

Pipelining Pipelining doesn't involve cycles shorter than a single clock cycle. Here's how pipelining works: We have a complicated task to do. We take that task and break it down into a number of stages, each of which is relatively simple to carry out. We study the amount of work in each stage to make sure each stage takes about the same amount of time ...


3

A typical modern CPU can execute a number of unrelated instructions (those that don't depend on the same resources) concurrently. To do that, it typically ends up with a basic structure vaguely like this: So, we have an instruction stream coming in on the left. We have three decoders, each of which can decode one instruction each clock cycle (but there ...


3

You don't need to execute both paths - given that there's usually a branch about every 5 instructions on average, that would be difficult since you'd soon end up with an exponential number of paths. Even if you only diverge like that on hard-to-predict branches, you could still end up with a significant number of parallel paths. The reason for adding a ...


3

I understand how and why the numbers are placed in the table like that. So you understand which how addresses map to cache lines, and that the vertical axis is time. But I don't understand why 2 and 5 have been bold-printed and why we got hit rate of 17%. The table entries are bold (cache hit) when the previous access to the same cache line was to ...


3

Like was mentioned by @Margaret Bloom in the comments, the numbers in bold refer to cache-hits. Non-bold refer to cache misses. You might understand it better by using this simulator: cachesimulator.com The Simulator works with WORD-instructions only, so a little conversion of your assignment need to be made in order to simulate it: cache-size: 32 bytes (...


3

No. You can't. You don't need to. It makes some sense for a compiler, as it can translate if (improbable) { doSomething(); } else { doSomethingElse(); } doMoreThings(); return; into (pseudocode) if (improbable) goto away doSomething() back: doMoreThings() return away: doSomethingElse() goto back so that the more probable path is streamlined. ...


3

An interrupt handler is a piece of code that runs asynchronously to the rest of the code, and can happen in response to an interrupt from a device outside the CPU. In user-space, a signal handler has equivalent semantics. Events like interrupts from network packets arriving or disk I/O completing happen asynchronously with respect to whatever the CPU was ...


2

You could run: apt-get install libgtk-3-dev:i386 then rerun your compile command and it should work. If the above command returns an error saying it cannot find the package specified, you may need to run this, then try again: dpkg --add-architecture i386 Warning: If the command above asks you to remove packages, read the list carefully, if the list ...


2

The x86 CPUID instruction doesn't require any privileges, so you can run it in a program for any OS. It has cache associativity information in leaf 2 (eax=2). See also the x86 tag wiki for more links to docs. It only works on x86, though, so if you care about portability to Windows on non-x86, you'll have to find something else for other architectures. ...


2

Try blocking in one dimension only, not in both dimensions. Matrix multiplication exhaustively processes elements from both matrices. Each row vector on the left matrix is repeatedly processed, taken into successive columns of the right matrix. If the matrices do not both fit into the cache, some data will invariably end up loaded multiple times. What we ...


2

On some architectures (such as x86, x86_64), the return address of a function is always stored on the stack and calling a function implies accessing the main memory: a write to the stack when calling; a read from the stack when returning. In contrast, if your architecture/ABI can jump/return without using the main memory and the parameters and return ...


2

The reason is that this means that when calling the leaf function the return address does not have to be pushed to the stack (since it's stored in the link register). This is supposed to be faster than pushing the return address to the stack as you do in processors that doesn't have a link register (but it's not certain that it is actually faster). However ...


2

When I first saw this question it had more downvotes than upvotes. But I think it is a reasonable question related to system performance and the differences between AMD and Intel processors. I think there are a couple of points worth addressing. ISA Licensing As I have always understood it, AMD built their CPUs by reverse engineering Intel's ...


2

I believe that for you particular situation (the second part of it) the only simple way to do what you want is this: compile with explicitly set "-xarch=sse4.2" (this allows the compiler to expand SSE4.2 intrinsics) and then strip off the HWCAP bits down to your minimal architecture (this makes your program runnable on pre-SSE4.2 hardware). For stripping ...


2

For your second question: how do I disable the -xarch bits so the program can run on down level processors? See Chapter 7 Capability Processing of the Linkers and Libraries Guide: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E53394_01/html/E54813/index.html This shows you how to deliver multiple instances of the same function which are tagged with the capability bits. ...


1

As others have noted the full details of how a modern CPU operates are complicated. But part of your question has a simple answer: Does CPU clock such as 3.4Ghz just means for based on pipeline cycle, not for based on single cycle implentation? The clock frequency of a CPU refers to how many times per second the clock signal switches. The clock ...


1

First, you do not want to remove the instruction set flags from your compiled binaries. When you compile with an -xarch=NNNN option, the compile will use those instructions. If you try to run on a "lower" processor that doesn't implement the instructions from the architecture you provided in the -xarch argument, your binary stands a good chance of not ...



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