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You can stuff more uint8_ts into a cache line, so loading N uint8_ts will be faster than loading N uint32_ts. In addition, if you are using a modern Intel chip with SIMD instructions, a smart compiler will vectorize what it can. Again, using a small variable in your code will allow the compiler to stuff more lanes into a SIMD register. I think it is best ...


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You may want to check out GreenArrays' GA144 processor. It's 144 very small processors in a rectangular grid complete with high-speed datalinks between nodes which work just like the TIS-100's. Each node is a F18A processor with 64 18-bit words of RAM (and 64 of ROM) which runs Forth more-or-less natively. All I/O is attached to nodes at the edge, so to get ...


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This seems to be a simplified mix of different real architectures from different centuries. The instruction set of each node is similar to a simplified 8051 from the 1980ties. The TIS-100 nodes have a ACC and BCK register and the 8051 uses a A & D register. The A register is in most instructions and the D register, just like the BCK register can only be ...


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Assuming those operations are JITted into x86 opcodes without any optimization, there is no difference. A possible x86 pseudo-assembly snippet for the two cases could be: cmp i, 1 je destination and: cmp i, 0 jg destination The cmp operation performs a subtraction between the two operands (register i and immediate 0), discards the result and sets some ...


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"How it works" really depends on the platform (e.g. the hardware instruction set), the version of Java that you are using, and the context (e.g. what happens before and after in the program.) For what it is worth, there is a java command-line option that will dump out the JIT compiled native code for a particular method: Disassemble Java JIT compiled ...


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Example 1 Compiled code MP-MFLOPSPiNeon that obtains >647 MFLOPS (data words 3.2k to 3.2M) on a 900 MHz Rpi2. Disassembly seems to be the same without threading. Compile/link command used and C code for 32 operations per data word are below [Someone might suggest faster compile options]. MP-MFLOPS Compiled NEON v1.0 gcc mpmflops.c cpuidc.c -lrt -lc ...


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Mark Lakata answer points in the right direction. I would like to add some points. A wonderful resource for understanding and taking optimization decision are the Agner documents. The Instruction Tables document has the latency for the most common instructions. You can see that some of them perform better in the native size version. A mov for example may ...


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Some architectures can make correctly predicted branches more or less free. It's called branch folding. Basically what happens is that when the branch predictor in the front end sees a branch that it's encountered before and whose target is known, instead of sending the branch down the pipeline, it can send the instruction at the branch target instead. ...


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David Kanter's writeup on Sandybridge (the first Intel CPU to introduce the uop cache in its current form) goes over the frontend in pretty good detail. He talks about where branch prediction happens in the pipeline, to hide the small stall in instruction fetch for a predicted taken branch, for example. One think you said in your question is a ...


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yes. The question already contained the answer, as the comments explained. :P (just posting an answer to get this out of the unanswered questions list.) I will add that Sandybridge and later Intel CPUs, with their uop cache, can more often come close to sustaining 4 uops per cycle in loops than previous CPUs (if the frontend is the bottleneck, rather than ...


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Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "_OBJC_CLASS_$_PlanITOSClient", referenced from: objc-class-ref in ServiceViewController.o 2)ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64 clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation -- Means your class ServiceViewController file is missing type 1 Check if that file is ...


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You will have to execute the branch, which would take execution resources (ports, queue entries, etc), although any alternative approach (such as conditional moves) would also require an equivalent effort. In addition, most out-of-order CPUs also employ dedicated queues to track branches, see for example the branch order buffer in Haswell - ...


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One of the comments linked mentions that setting the process affinity can achieve what you want. I would also suggest making a custom version of get_ccnt() whereby replacing RDTSC with RDTSCP. The latter is a variant of the former which also returns the cpuid with the cycle counter. You could check that your initial measurement's cpuid is equal to the final ...


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Yes, contemporary Intel processors are both pipelined and superscalar. It takes many nanoseconds to execute a single instruction. That includes fetching the instruction from the instruction memory, decoding the instruction, fetching the operands, performing any computations, fetching data from memory, and writing the results. For even basic performance it ...


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Within the RoCC interface, the mem field is a connection to the L1 cache. The dmem field is a connection to the L2 cache. Which one you want to use depends upon the memory bandwidth requirements of your accelerator. Rocket and the RoCC accelerator can either share data through the caches (remember to use a fence instruction on the Rocket core so the ...



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