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83

Short answer: Remove Build Active Architecture Only (build setting parameter key is 'ONLY_ACTIVE_ARCH') from all of your static libraries' project build settings or overwrite it with 'NO' like in the screenshot below: Detailed answer: The problem is that your static library 'libCordova.a' which you're linking in your main app is only compiled for one ...


72

Because the CPU can't address anything smaller than a byte.


72

If your project was built using Cordova 2.x and Xcode 4.x, and you are receiving the error mentioned by the OP, this solution worked for me. (I was experiencing the error with Cordova 2.5 and Xcode 5). https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CB-3768 Go to your Cordova Project Root Folder -> CordovaLib -> Right Click CordovaLib.xcodeproj -> Show Package ...


54

x86-64 is a bit of a special case - for many architectures (eg. SPARC), compiling an application for 64 bit mode doesn't give it any benefit unless it can profitably use more than 4GB of memory. All it does is increase the size of the binary, which can actually make the code slower if it impacts on cache behaviour. However, x86-64 gives you more than just ...


48

It is so strange that nobody links to the MSDN blog entry What AnyCPU Really Means As Of .NET 4.5 and Visual Studio 11: In .NET 4.5 and Visual Studio 11 the cheese has been moved. The default for most .NET projects is again AnyCPU, but there is more than one meaning to AnyCPU now. There is an additional sub-type of AnyCPU, “Any CPU 32-bit ...


38

It is near impossible to find specs on Intel caches. When I was teaching a class on caches last year, I asked friends inside Intel (in the compiler group) and they couldn't find specs. But wait!!! Jed, bless his soul, tells us that on Linux systems, you can squeeze lots of information out of the kernel: grep . ...


37

The unix.linux 'file' command is great for this. It can generally detect the target architecture and operating system for a given binary (and has been maintained on and off since 1973. wow!) Of course, if you're not running under unix/linux - you're a bit stuck. I'm currently trying to find a java based port that I can call at runtime.. but no such luck. ...


32

Use dumpbin /headers The machine type is almost the first line you'll get. It will be 14c for x86 and 8664 for x64 n:>dumpbin lib642.lib /headers Microsoft (R) COFF/PE Dumper Version 10.00.30319.01 Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Dump of file lib642.lib File Type: LIBRARY FILE HEADER VALUES ...


30

Here are FLOPs counts for a number of recent processor microarchitectures and explanation how to achieve them: Intel Core 2 and Nehalem: 4 DP FLOPs/cycle: 2-wide SSE2 addition + 2-wide SSE2 multiplication 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition + 4-wide SSE multiplication Intel Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge: 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide AVX addition + 4-wide AVX ...


28

There's a short overview at MinGW-w64 Wiki: Why doesn't mingw-w64 gcc support Dwarf-2 Exception Handling? The Dwarf-2 EH implementation for Windows is not designed at all to work under 64-bit Windows applications. In win32 mode, the exception unwind handler cannot propagate through non-dw2 aware code, this means that any exception going ...


27

I fixed all of my compile errors by using #include <windows.h> instead of #include <WinDef.h>. I still don't know why #include <WinDef.h> is causing me all of these problems.


24

A similar technology does exist for Java - ARM do a range of CPUs that can do this, they call it their "Jazelle" technology. However, the operations represented by .net IL opcodes are only well-defined in combination with the type information held on the stack, not on their own. This is a major difference from Java bytecode, and would make it much more ...


23

One possible benefit I haven't seen mentioned yet is that it might uncover latent bugs. Once you port it to 64-bit, a number of changes are made. The sizes of some datatypes change, the calling convention changes, the exception handling mechanism (at least on Windows) changes. All of this might lead to otherwise hidden bugs surfacing, which means that you ...


23

Dual issue means that each clock cycle the processor can move two instructions from one stage of the pipeline to another. Where this happens depends on the processor and the company's terminology: it can mean that two instructions are moved from a decode queue to a reordering queue (Intel calls this issue) or it could mean moving instructions (or ...


22

There's a special task called the idle task that runs when no other task can be run. The % usage is just the percentage of the time we're not running the idle task. The OS will keep a running total of the time spent running the idle task: when we switch to the idle task, set t = current time when we switch away from the idle task, add (current time - t) to ...


21

The CPU doesn't do the usage calculations by itself. It may have hardware features to make that task easier, but it's mostly the job of the operating system. So obviously the details of implementations will vary (especially in the case of multicore systems). The general idea is to see how long is the queue of things the CPU needs to do. The operating system ...


21

The only things guaranteed about integer types are: sizeof(char) == 1 sizeof(char) <= sizeof(short) sizeof(short) <= sizeof(int) sizeof(int) <= sizeof(long) sizeof(long) <= sizeof(long long) sizeof(char) * CHAR_BIT >= 8 sizeof(short) * CHAR_BIT >= 16 sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT >= 16 sizeof(long) * CHAR_BIT >= 32 sizeof(long long) * ...


20

I recently started reading Charles Petzold book titled Code, which so far covers exactly the kinds of things I assume you are curious about. But I have not gotten all the way through so thumb through the book first before buying/borrowing. This is my relatively short answer, not Petzolds...and hopefully in line with what you were curios about. You have ...


19

AMD processor in the early-gigahertz era had a 40 cycle penalty every time you called a function Huh.. so large.. There is an "Indirect branch prediction" method, which helps to predict virtual function jump, IF there was the same indirect jump some time ago. There is still a penalty for first and mispredicted virt. function jump. Support varies from ...


16

C++ standard only specifies that long is at least as big as int, so there's nothing criminal in the scenario when it is exactly as big: it's totally implementation-defined. On different platforms, sizes may matter, for example I'm having int of size 4 and long of size 8 at the moment on my Linux machine.


15

No, (E/R)IP cannot be accessed directly. To get it: call _here _here: pop eax ; eax now holds the PC.


15

You seem a bit confused about how CPU's work. Assembly is not a separate language from machine code. It is simply a different (textual) representation of it. Assembly code is simply a sequential listing of instructions to be executed. And machine code is exactly the same thing. Every instruction supported by the CPU has a certain bit-pattern that cause it ...


15

From Wikipedia: Historically, a byte was the number of bits used to encode a single character of text in a computer and it is for this reason the basic addressable element in many computer architectures. So byte is the basic addressable unit, below which computer architecture cannot address. And since there doesn't (probably) exist computers ...


14

If you need the address of a specific instruction, usually something like this does the trick: thisone: mov (e)ax,thisone (Note: On some assemblers this might do the wrong thing and read a word from [thisone], but there's usually some syntax for getting the assembler to do the right thing.) If your code is statically loaded to a specific address, the ...


14

Here's what 64-bit does for you: 64-bit allows you to use more memory than a 32-bit app. 64-bit makes all pointers 64-bits, which makes your code footprint larger. 64-bit gives you more integer and floating point registers, which causes less spilling registers to memory, which should speed up your app somewhat. 64-bit can make 64-bit ALU operations faster ...


14

At least with a typical desktop CPU, you can't really specify much about cache usage directly. You can still try to write cache-friendly code though. On the code side, this often means unrolling loops (for just one obvious example) is rarely useful -- it expands the code, and a modern CPU typically minimizes the overhead of looping. You can generally do more ...


14

Edit: Here is a example of CPU (6502) that has been simulated using python/javascript AT THE TRANSISTOR LEVEL http://visual6502.org You can put your code in to see how it to do what it does. Edit: Excellent 10 000m Level View : Soul of a New Machine - Tracy Kidder I had great difficulty envisioning this until I did microcoding. Then it all made sense ...


14

Executive summary: Different cache levels can sustain different peak bandwidths for the same basic workload, so having differently sized data-sets can greatly impact performance. Longer explanation: It's not very surprising considering that Haswell, according to this article for e.g. can sustain 2 loads and 1 store per cycle but that's only ...


14

I actually did a study on this a few years ago. The answer depends on what exactly your question is: In today's processors, power consumption is not much determined by the type of instruction (scalar vs. SIMD), but rather everything else such as: Memory/cache Instruction decoding OOE, register file And lots others. So if the question is: All other ...



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