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9

Back in the "old days" when performance was always a concern, it made more sense. It was used in communication to verify integrity (do error checking) and a substantial portion of communication was serial, which makes more use of parity than parallel communications. In any case, it was trivial for the CPU to compute it using just 8 XOR gates, but otherwise ...


6

From Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual, Volume 2A: Instruction Set Reference, A-L: "Invalidates the cache line that contains the linear address specified with the source operand from all levels of the processor cache hierarchy (data and instruction) ." Since it uses the linear (virtual) address, the address needs to be ...


6

I decide to add one more solution for any, who got here: personally in my case the information provided by the file and objdump wasn't enough, and the grep isn't much of a help -- I resolve my case through the readelf -a -W. Note, that this gives you pretty much info. The arch related information resides in the very beginning and the very end. Here's an ...


5

The first bytes of each instruction indicate its length. If things were simple, the first byte would indicate the length, but there are prefixes that indicate that the next byte is the real instruction, in addition to variable-length suffixes that contain instruction operands. The real question is, since a modern Out-Of-Order processor decodes 3 or 4 ...


5

You're right in being afraid of exponentially filling the machine, but you underestimate the power of that. A common rule-of-thumb says you can expect to have ~20% branches on average in your dynamic code. This means one branch in every 5 instructions. Most CPUs today have a deep out-of-order core that fetches and executes hundreds of instructions ahead - ...


5

C++ principally a pay-for-what-you-need eco-system. Any regular queue will let you choose the storage semantics (by value or by reference). However, this time you ordered something special: you ordered a lock free queue. In order to be lock free, it must be able to perform all the observable modifying operations as atomic operations. This naturally ...


5

Short Answer: The store-load barrier prevents the processor from speculatively executing LOAD that come after a store-load barrier until all previous stores have completed. Details: The reason that a store-load barrier is expensive is the it prevents the reordering of LOAD and STORE operations across the barrier. Suppose you had an instruction sequence ...


5

“64-bit machine” is an ambiguous term but usually means that the processor's General-Purpose Registers are 64-bit wide. Compare 8086 and 8088, which have the same instruction set and can both be called 16-bit processors in this sense. When the phrase is used in this sense, it has nothing to do with the width of the memory bus, the width of the internal ...


5

mulsi3 is special name. You can give it to insn patterns only when they are extremely simple. Really in your case mulsi3 pattern should be define_expand, then you can make it fail on some branches (with explicit FAIL statement). Compiler should generate libgcc call when specialized expand pattern fails. But there are two more corrections: 1) Prefer ...


4

Check if that file is included in Build Phases -> Compiled Sources


4

The short answer is that the x86 family of processors were all designed to be backward compatible. The logic circuits that perform arithmetic and read/write operations in new CPUs are still capable of carrying out instructions designed for older CPUs while also carrying out newer instructions like 64-bit add and subtract. If you want more history... The ...


4

Is assembly implemented only in software with assembler? Yes. Assembly language is a programming language just like any other, it just uses operation codes that are very close to the instruction set in the processor. It still compiles from a text file that contains source code into machine code that the processor can use. Who updates and writes ...


4

A x64 native (AMD64 or Intel 64) processor is only mandated to support SSE and SSE2. SSE3 is supported by Intel Pentium 4 processors (“Prescott”), AMD Athlon 64 (“revision E”), AMD Phenom, and later processors. This means most, but not quite all, x64 capable CPUs should support SSE3. Supplemental SSE3 (SSSE3) is supported by Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core ...


4

CMOV instructions don't direct the path of control flow. They are instructions that are executed to compute the result based on condition codes, i.e. predicated instructions. Some architectures (like ARM) can predicate many forms of instructions based on condition codes, but x86 can only do "mov", that is, the conditional move (CMOV). These are decoded, and ...


4

I have produced several reports on stress testing PCs via my [Free] reliability/burn-in tests for Windows and Linux. You can find the reports through Googling for “Roy Longbottom burn-in”. What you need is a variety of programs that run at high speeds to test CPUs, caches and RAM. They should log and display speeds at reasonably short intervals with ...


4

Try using: String arch = System.getProperty("os.arch"); Here is a complete list of System.getProperty() parameters.


4

You will see from the __user_initial_stackheap() documentation, that the function is for legacy support and that it is superseded by __user_setup_stackheap(); the documentation for the latter provides a clue ragarding your question: Unlike __user_initial_stackheap(), __user_setup_stackheap() works with systems where the application starts with a value of ...


4

Expanding on Pascal's answer, on the x86 architecture, the very first byte indicates which category of instructions the one being decoded belongs to: 1 byte length, which means that it's been read already and can be further processed, 1 byte opcode with a few more bytes (the so called ModRM and SIB bytes) to indicate which operands are following ...


4

First, the processor does not need to know how many bytes to fetch, it can fetch a convenient number of bytes sufficient to provide the targeted throughput for typical or average instruction lengths. Any extra bytes can be place in a buffer to be used in the next group of bytes to be decoded. There are tradeoffs in the width and alignment of fetch relative ...


4

1. First of all related to your first question: It is very difficult to produce processors which are produced by different production processes. Processors (and chips in general) are 'printed' on wafers, many processors together on the same wafer. They are not fabricated in parts and put together afterwards. So in general only one manufacturing process is ...


4

Absolutely SIMD is still relevant. First, SIMD can more easily interoperate with scalar code, because it can read and write the same memory directly, while GPUs require the data to be uploaded to GPU memory before it can be accessed. For example, it's straightforward to vectorize a function like memcmp() via SIMD, but it would be absurd to implement ...


3

If a CPU were to reorder the loads, your code would require a load barrier in order to work correctly. There are plenty of architectures that do such reordering; see the table in Memory ordering for some examples. Thus in the general case your code does require load barriers. x86 is not very typical in that it provides pretty stringent memory ordering ...


3

The LOCK prefix has one purpose, that is taking a lock on that address followed by instructing MESI to flush that cache line on all other processors followed so that reading or writing that address by all other processors (or hardware devices!) blocks until the lock is released (which it is at the end of the instruction). The LOCK prefix is slow (several ...


3

How does the instruction set affect which compiler is needed? The compiler needs to produce different instructions if the processor has a different instruction set. Most compilers support multiple instruction sets so you may not need to change the compiler just because the instruction set changes. Does it depend on the actual instruction set or only ...


3

The simple answer is NO. The processor usually looks up L1 first. In case of an L1 miss, it looks up L2 then. If it misses, it looks up DRAM. The whole point of the cache hierarchy is to have faster data access by storing most frequently accessed data in cache. DRAM is pretty slow compared to cache. As the cache level increases (for example, going from L1 ...


3

The problem is not with the ability of the CPU to address any single byte in the memory. But it is the memory that has not the same granularity. Like Oli said, this is very architecture-specific, but memory chips are often addressed by their data bus wideness. Meaning that a given address represents a full "word" of their data bus. Let's take the example of ...


3

This page gives a high-level explanation of why the multiple CPU types exist on this chip: Samsung Exynos 5 Octa (Exynos 5410 processor) (samsung.com) It is designed using the ARM® big.LITTLE™ architecture that offers up to 70 percent energy saving when performing various tasks, compared to using ARM® Cortex- A15™ cores only. It seamlessly switches ...


3

You swapped the order here. If the L1 instruction cache is physically tagged (as in the vast majority of CPUs), then you first access the iTLB to convert your instruction pointer / program counter from a virtual address into a physical one, and only then access the L1 with that. Therefor, since in x86 all the instructions are accessed through the virtual ...


3

Server CPU clock shows 1177 MHz, while workstation has 3691 MHz clock. That would explain the difference. It seems your server has either a CPU that slows down if not unders stress, to conserve energy, or the multipliers in BIOS are set to very low values.


3

I HIGHLY suggest using CocoaPods to manage this dependency. I once integrated SoundCloud into a project without using CocoaPods and it was a pain in the rear. Look at this link and do a search for CocoaPods to see how to install it: https://github.com/soundcloud/CocoaSoundCloudAPI



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