New answers tagged

2

On some architectures (such as x86, x86_64), the return address of a function is always stored on the stack and calling a function implies accessing the main memory: a write to the stack when calling; a read from the stack when returning. In contrast, if your architecture/ABI can jump/return without using the main memory and the parameters and return ...


1

The reason is that this means that when calling the leaf function the return address does not have to be pushed to the stack (since it's stored in the link register). This is supposed to be faster than pushing the return address to the stack as you do in processors that doesn't have a link register (but it's not certain that it is actually faster). However ...


0

If you want your libraries to run efficiently then they will need to be compiled for specific architectures. For example Cortex M0 code will run on and M3 but M3 code will not run on a M0 (The M0 is a ARMv6m architecture whereas M3 is a ARMv7m architecture). If your libraries use floating point then you will also have to consider this.


2

When I first saw this question it had more downvotes than upvotes. But I think it is a reasonable question related to system performance and the differences between AMD and Intel processors. I think there are a couple of points worth addressing. ISA Licensing As I have always understood it, AMD built their CPUs by reverse engineering Intel's ...


0

Software compatibility with processors is ensured by the fact that they can be queried for availability of certain well-defined instructions or instruction groups. (The instruction sets are extremely volatile these days; this can be a nightmare for developers.) So even among the Intel family, programs can run at quite different performance, depending on ...


3

How do you define "your computer"? The first time the CPU or the motherboard powered up ever? Does manufacturer's testing count? The manufactured date of each component might be stored somewhere and might be accessible but it depends on the hardware part and might need bios support first, not at os level. Or if you want to find the date your OS was installed,...


1

If there is one thread application which has say 10 threads, initially it will start on the same CPU/core.over a period of time the multiple threads will be distributed to other cores/cpus due to the load balancer in Linux. If there are multiple such thread applications are there,I think all the application threads mostly run on the same core/cpu as the ...


3

They implement the same ISA, but with different performance characteristics because the microarchitecture is different. e.g. see Agner Fog's microarch pdf for details, and other links from the x86 tag wiki. e.g. David Kanter's Haswell microarchitecture writeup vs. his writeup of AMD Bulldozer. Agner Fog's instruction tables also show you exactly how fast ...


-1

SIMD instructions are very different, and for some tasks (like games) they can make a difference. See this answer for specific example: http://stackoverflow.com/a/17355341/126995 If you really want to, you can create several versions of your inner-loop algorithms, and use cpuid in runtime to select the best implementation for the platform. Some people do ...


-1

basically there is a difference in the processing. AMD and Intel pay each other fees for using the patents of the others. That does not mean that both have the same design. The base instruction set is equal, but both have additional instructions that are specific for the CPU while they are basically emulated on the other CPU (at least most of them) which ...


0

You cannot have a negative displacement in x86 assembly. The x86 ISA just doesn't support this. You can only have a wrap around by adding a value that is too big to fit into the specific address size. For example - in 8-bit address space(max 255) - if you want to subtract the value of 3 from the address 254=0xFE, you would add 253=0xFD. 254 + 253 = ...


0

The displacement is treated as a signed value (yes, two's complement). Also, be sure to wrap around on address overflow.


1

I hadn't heard the term "scheduling stall" before, but it sounds like it's just saying that the pipeline will bottleneck on the scalar part. The scalar part still runs at its max throughput. So I think the wording of that wikipedia article is misleading: "the part which is not suffers a performance penalty" certainly makes it sound like the scalar part ...


0

It would work like any other BigInt library, only (a lot) faster and at a lower level: Processor fetches one digit from the cache/RAM, adds it, and writes the result back again. Almost all CPUs do have this built-in. You have to use a software loop around the relevant instructions, but that doesn't make it slower if the loop is efficient. (That's non-...


1

A superscalar processor/core is the one which can decode more than one instructions in parallel and a processor/core is seen superscalar in totality not in it's parts. Not sure if there is some standard definition of "scheduling stalls" but author's purpose is to highlight the stalls in the pipeline caused by the constrained of execution units (limited to ...


2

Yes, the out-of-order core in modern microarchitectures operates basically the same regardless of mode. Most of the difference is in the decoders. See Agner Fog's microarch pdf and other links in the x86 tag wiki for details of how modern CPUs actually do work internally. It would probably take extra silicon to behave differently in 16bit mode, since it's ...


0

As I found out this is a reported bug https://github.com/pypa/setuptools/issues/253 The setuptools do only check for the OS architecture and ignore the plat-name string for the installation of scripts. Workaround (until this issue is closed): Use the target architecture for building the wininst.


1

The original Intel x86 processors, the 8080 processor, were 8 bit processors designed with an eye for for applications such as special purpose, small computers (cash registers for instance) or equipment controllers rather than general purpose computers (competitors included the Motorola 6800). The following 8086 processor family (8086 and cost reduced 8088) ...


0

Somewhere in the BIOS it should tell you the CPU model string. It may flash by during POST, it it may be listed in the setup menus. Once you have that, look up the specs for that model online. (Ark.intel.com is a good source for Intel CPUs.)


1

An easy solution would be to use a bootable Linux CD or usb key. A tiny distro like Slax https://www.slax.org/ would do the job. It doesn't need to be installed, it runs entirely from the boot medium.


8

TL;DR: It gives the compiler and hardware more room to take advantage of the as-if rule by not requiring it to preserve all behaviour of the original source, only the result of the single thread itself. Taking the externally-observable (from other threads) ordering of loads/stores out of the picture as something that optimizations must preserve gives the ...


1

If a device uses DMA (Direct Memory Access), it is able to read or/and write directly from/to the main memory. If a device can generate interrupts, it is able to notify the CPU that it requires attention. So, DMA and interrupts are principally completely independent. They can of course be combined, e.g. a device can notify the CPU that it has finished a DMA. ...


2

I don't believe there is a predefined macro that specifically addresses the fast multiplication feature. There are, however, a lot of predefined compiler macros for different architectures so if you already know in advance what architectures or CPUs support the fast multiplication instruction, you can use those macros do define your own application-specific ...


7

Is there any way for C code to tell whether it is being compiled on an architecture where multiplication is fast? Is there some macro __FAST_MULT__ or something which is defined on those architectures? No, standard C does not provide any such facility. It is possible that particular compilers provide such a thing as an extension, but I am not specifically ...


3

On a modern processor chip, the processor can typically perform register to register operations an order of magnitude (or more) faster that fetching from main memory. Operations that hit the L1 or L2 caches are faster than main memory, slower than register to register. The other thing to note is that modern processors chips typically use a pipeline which ...


0

Walk into a cafe and ask for a drink and a sandwich. The person behind the counter hands you the sandwich (which is right next to him), then walks to the fridge to get your drink. Do you care that he gave them to you in the "wrong" order? Would you rather he did the slow one first, simply because that's how you gave the order? Well, maybe you do care. ...


5

Imagine to have the following code: a = 1; b = 1; a = a + 1; // Not present in the register b = b + 1; // Not present in the register a = a + 1; // Not present in the register b = b + 1; // Not present in the register // Here both a and b has value 3 A possible optimization using memory reorder is a = 1; a = a + 1; // Already in the register a =...


4

The site you linked to notes: zero() is slowest, because the JIT can't yet optimize away the cost of getting the array length once for every iteration through the loop. I haven't tested on Android, but I'll assume that this is true for now. What this means is that for every iteration of the loop the CPU has to execute code that loads the value of ...


1

When an hardware interrupt happens, the privilege level of the currently executing code can be ignored; the CPU can simply switch to the interrupt's privilege level without checking it. The Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 3A: System Programming Guide, Part 1 says in section 6.12.1.1: Protection of Exception- and ...


1

When we write always @(signal) in verilog, a specified sensitivity list, the logic is triggered on a change in that signal. This can lead to misunderstanding of how hardware actually works. The only hardware we have that changes on an edge is a flip-flop and you need to specify the posedge or negedge keyword for that. When always @(signal) is synthesised ...


0

Interpreting assumption 5 to mean the CPU isn't deranged in any way be transferring data to the GPU. There is obviously no reason not to use the GPU, you can only gain. By not taking assumption 5 into account the question gets more interesting. Assuming while transferring data from CPU to GPU, the CPU can't calculate, we arrive at this: I think you are ...


4

Traps and interrupts are closely related. Traps are a type of exception, and exceptions are similar to interrupts. Intel x86 defines two overlapping categories, vectored events (interrupts vs exceptions), and exception classes (faults vs traps vs aborts). All of the quotes in this post are from the April 2016 version of the Intel Software Developer Manual. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included