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535

Inside a function, the bytecode is 2 0 SETUP_LOOP 20 (to 23) 3 LOAD_GLOBAL 0 (xrange) 6 LOAD_CONST 3 (100000000) 9 CALL_FUNCTION 1 12 GET_ITER >> 13 FOR_ITER 6 (to 22) 16 STORE_FAST ...


406

PyPy, as others have been quick to mention, has tenuous support for C extensions. It has support, but typically at slower-than-Python speeds and it's iffy at best. Hence a lot of modules simply require CPython. Cython and Numpy are awesome for numerics, and most people who actually need speed in Python are using those (+ Pandas, SciPy, etc.) heavily. Since ...


235

You might ask why it is faster to store local variables than globals. This is a CPython implementation detail. Remember that CPython is compiled to bytecode, which the interpreter runs. When a function is compiled, the local variables are stored in a fixed-size array (not a dict) and variable names are assigned to indexes. This is possible because you can't ...


183

TL;DR The actual speed difference is closer to 70% (or more) once a lot of the overhead is removed, for Python 2. Object creation is not at fault. Neither method creates a new object, as one-character strings are cached. The difference is unobvious, but is likely created from a greater number of checks on string indexing, with regards to the type and ...


124

All integers from -5 to 256 inclusive are cached as global objects sharing the same address with CPython, thus the is test passes. This artifact is explained in detail in http://www.laurentluce.com/posts/python-integer-objects-implementation/, and we could check the current source code in http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/tip/Objects/longobject.c. A ...


116

I'm going to assume any readers of this question to have read both: Zero Piraeus' answer and My explanation of CPython's dictionaries. The first thing to note is that hash randomization is decided on interpreter start-up. The hash of each letter will be the same for both sets, so the only thing that can matter is if there is a collision (where order ...


72

So what is CPython CPython is the original Python implementation. It is the implementation you download from Python.org. People call it CPython to distinguish it from other, later, Python implementations, and to distinguish the implementation of the language engine from the Python programming language itself. The latter part is where your confusion comes ...


58

That site does not claim PyPy is 6.3 times faster than CPython. To quote: The geometric average of all benchmarks is 0.16 or 6.3 times faster than CPython This is a very different statement to the blanket statement you made, and when you understand the difference, you'll understand at least one set of reasons why you can't just say "use PyPy". It might ...


45

Let's see: >>> x = 1 >>> y = 2 >>> def swap_xy(): ... global x, y ... (x, y) = (y, x) ... >>> dis.dis(swap_xy) 3 0 LOAD_GLOBAL 0 (y) 3 LOAD_GLOBAL 1 (x) 6 ROT_TWO 7 STORE_GLOBAL 1 (x) 10 STORE_GLOBAL ...


40

Because pypy is not 100% compatible, takes 8 gigs of ram to compile, is a moving target, and highly experimental, where cpython is stable, the default target for module builders for 2 decades (including c extensions that don't work on pypy), and already widely deployed. Pypy will likely never be the reference implementation, but it is a good tool to have.


29

When you call id({}), Python creates a dict and passes it to the id function. The id function takes its id (its memory location), and throws away the dict. The dict is destroyed. When you do it twice in quick succession (without any other dicts being created in the mean time), the dict Python creates the second time happens to use the same block of memory as ...


27

When you iterate over most container objects (lists, tuples, dicts, ...), the iterator delivers the objects in the container. But when you iterate over a string, a new object has to be created for each character delivered - a string is not "a container" in the same sense a list is a container. The individual characters in a string don't exist as distinct ...


25

There are a number of important differences: Interoperability with other .NET languages. You can use other .NET libraries from an IronPython application, or use IronPython from a C# application, for example. This interoperability is increasing, with a movement toward greater support for dynamic types in .NET 4.0. For a lot of detail on this, see these ...


25

You can usually get access to anything you need, even when __builtins__ has been removed. It's just a matter of digging far enough. For example: Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 10 2012, 23:31:26) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> __builtins__ = 0 >>> open Traceback ...


24

When people say sets have O(1) membership-checking, they are talking about the average case. In the worst case (when all hashed values collide) membership-checking is O(n). See the Python wiki on time complexity. The Wikipedia article says the best case time complexity for a hash table that does not resize is O(1 + k/n). This result does not directly apply ...


23

Python stores integers in the range -5 - 256 in the interpreter: it has a pool of integer objects from which these integers are returned. That's why those objects are the same: (0-5) and -5 but not (0-6) and -6 as these are created on the spot. Here's the source in the source code of CPython: #define NSMALLPOSINTS 257 #define NSMALLNEGINTS ...


22

See this bug and its superseder. str.split() is a native function in CPython, and as such exhibits the behavior described here: CPython implementation detail: An implementation may provide built-in functions whose positional parameters do not have names, even if they are ‘named’ for the purpose of documentation, and which therefore cannot be ...


21

CPython is garbage collecting objects as soon as they go out of scope, so the second [] is created after the first [] is collected. So, most of the time it ends up in the same memory location. This shows what's happening very clearly (the output is likely to be different in other implementations of Python): class A(object): def __init__(self): print ...


21

According to this thread: Indeed, CPython's sets are implemented as something like dictionaries with dummy values (the keys being the members of the set), with some optimization(s) that exploit this lack of values So basically a set uses a hashtable as it's underlying data structure. This explains the O(1) membership checking, since looking up an ...


19

It's not a bug. is is not an equality test. == will give the expected results. The technical reason for this behavior is that a Python implementation is free to treat different instances of the same constant value as either the same object, or as different objects. The Python implementation you're using chooses to make certain small constants share the same ...


19

The second question is easier to answer: you basically can use PyPy as a drop-in replacement if all your code is pure Python. However, many widely used libraries (including some of the standard library) are written in C and compiled as Python extensions. Some of these can be made to work with PyPy, some can't. PyPy provides the same "forward-facing" tool ...


18

To find the implementation of any python operator, first find out what bytecode Python generates for it, using the dis.dis function: >>> def inop(): ... '0' in [] ... >>> dis.dis(inop) 2 0 LOAD_CONST 1 ('0') 3 LOAD_CONST 2 (()) 6 COMPARE_OP 6 (in) ...


16

Python keeps a pool of int objects in certain numbers. When you create one in that range, you actually get a reference to the pre-existing one. I suspect this is for optimization reasons. For numbers outside the range of that pool, you appear to get back a new object whenever you try to make one. $ python Python 3.2 (r32:88445, Apr 15 2011, 11:09:05) [GCC ...


16

You've fallen into a not uncommon trap: id(2 * x + y) == id(300 + x) The two expressions 2 * x + y and 300 + x don't have overlapping lifetimes. That means that Python can calculate the left hand side, take its id, and then free the integer before it calculates the right hand side. When CPython frees an integer it puts it on a list of freed integers and ...


15

The exception message actually offers you a hint. Compare the non-unpacking option: >>> import sys >>> sys.setrecursionlimit(4) # to get there faster >>> def f(): f() ... >>> f() Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "<stdin>", line 1, in f File ...


14

If you do find you need to write unique code for an environment, use pythons import mymodule_jython as mymodule import mymodule_cpython as mymodule have this stuff in a simple module (''module_importer''?) and write your code like this: from module_importer import mymodule This way, all you need to do is alter module_importer.py per platform.


14

How does Python detect & free circular memory references before making use of the gc module? It doesn't. The gc exists only to detect and free circular references. Non-circular references are handled through refcounting. Now, to see how gc determines the set of objects referenced by any given object, take a look at the gc_get_references function in ...


14

Much of this is answered in the Memory Management chapter of the C API documentation. Some of the documentation is vaguer than you're asking for. For further details, you'd have to turn to the source code. And nobody's going to be willing to do that unless you pick a specific version. (At least 2.7.5, pre-2.7.6, 3.3.2, pre-3.3.3, and pre-3.4 would be ...


13

There are some subtle differences in how you write your code, but the biggest difference is in the libraries you have available. With IronPython, you have all the .Net libraries available, but at the expense of some of the "normal" python libraries that haven't been ported to the .Net VM I think. Basically, you should expect the syntax and the idioms to be ...


13

You want the code module. #!/usr/bin/env python import code code.interact("Enter Here")



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