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1

Not sure what your column family (table) definition looks like, but your sample data could never exist like that in Cassandra. Primary keys are unique, and if id is your primary key, the last write would win. Basically, your table would look something like this: id | value A | xx C | xxx B | xx As for your individual queries... SELECT * FROM Y WHERE ...


1

That's because the IN operator only works on the last part of the primary key, or the last part of the clustering key. I thought before that "tuple notation" would work, but according to this doc, it only works on clustering columns. That being said, using IN combined with = should work on either key column: aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT * FROM ...


1

python-driver is the preferred python driver for cassandra as it supports CQL3 and the cassandra native protocol. pycassa is a thrift based python driver that doesn't support CQL. This is effectively deprecated by python-driver and is no longer being actively developed. cqlengine is an object mapper for python that uses python-driver. This is used for ...


0

Maybe something similar to "Time Series Pattern 2 Partitioning to limit row size", but using a week of the year instead of day of the year for the date, would work for you. Maybe you could use some Cassandra features for granularity in slicing over partition rows described on this page: ...


0

Cassandra CQL != SQL. It will not process an UPDATE without the complete primary key. From the DataStax documentation on the UPDATE command: The UPDATE SET operation is not valid on a primary key field. To update your clustering key, you will have to: delete the current row update/insert the entire row again, with your new clustering key value


0

In your schema CREATE TABLE styles ( styleid ascii, sequence int, active boolean, image ascii, name ascii, PRIMARY KEY (styleid, sequence) ) WITH CLUSTERING ORDER BY (sequence DESC) AND bloom_filter_fp_chance=0.010000 AND caching='KEYS_ONLY' AND comment='' AND dclocal_read_repair_chance=0.100000 AND gc_grace_seconds=864000 AND ...


3

For tombstone counts on a query your best bet is to enable tracing. This will give you the in depth history of a query including how many tombstones had to be read to complete it. This won't give you the total tombstone count, but is most likely more relevant for performance tuning. In cqlsh you can enable this with cqlsh> tracing on; Now tracing ...


-1

Please try this Insert into initialActivity() values (select activity from preActivity where caseId = 111 LIMIT 1 ); Only first rows with column activity with caseId = 111 will get inserted into initialActivity table Please refer this for more info CQL


0

If you want to obtain all fields in a collection you could use getMap(..) function and you will get a Map with keys and values. On the other hand, check new object Mapping API since version 2.1 and you can map a class directly from ResultSet with annotations in your entity class.


2

For a relatively simple way, you could always do a quick COPY TO/FROM in cqlsh. Let's say that I have a column family (table) called "emp" for employees. CREATE TABLE stackoverflow.emp ( id int PRIMARY KEY, fname text, lname text, role text ) And for the purposes of this example, I have one row in it. aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> ...


1

Here's one I've started and have been using for a while. https://github.com/heartysoft/aedes It supports multiple environments, and versioning. Since we're Windows based, it's mainly powershell, but there's no reason a bash script couldn't be written to do the equivalent. The powershell script itself is extremely simple. It requires Powershell v3+. Usage ...


1

Since there wasn't an existing tool, I ended up writing one. It is called cql-migrate, and provides incremental updates to a deployed Cassandra schema.


1

It turns out that there was a bug in Cassandra versions 2.0.5-2.0.9 that would make Cassandra more likely to request data on two nodes when it only needed to talk to one. Upgrading to 2.0.10 or greater resolves this problem. Refer: CASSANDRA-7535


4

I remembered seeing someone answer this question in the Cassandra user mailing list a short while back, but I cannot find the exact message right now. Ironically, Cassandra Evangelist Rebecca Mills just posted an article that addresses this issue (Things you should be doing when using Cassandra drivers...points #13 and #22). But the answer is "yes" that in ...


2

CREATE TABLE bwlists ( uuid uuid PRIMARY KEY, bwl map<ascii, bw map<ascii, ascii>>); Bad Request: line 1:79 no viable alternative at input '>' Your first problem, is that you are trying to name the map bw within the bwl map. That's not going to work, as CQL is not expecting to find an identifier (instead of a type). Your syntax can ...


1

The configuration is not a factor, but the way Cassandra works. Using the default Murmur3Partitioner (recommended), querying by PLOT_ID partition key, which is a compound primary key, is retrieving all rows stored by (PLOT_ID INDEX_VALUE). When you include the INDEX_VALUE in the query, Cassandra retrieves less data, so I think this explains why it doesn't ...


3

There is a way to select rows based on columns that are not a part of the primary key by creating secondary index. Let me explain this with an example. In this schema: CREATE TABLE playerInfo ( player_id int, name varchar, country varchar, age int, performance int, PRIMARY KEY ((player_id, name), country) ); the first part of ...


0

Unsatisfactory Work-Around found* After trying a lot of variations of the test code (above), I have come to the view that the statement: "UPDATE test.test SET lock = '%s' WHERE id = 'session_id1' IF lock = '' " around 5% of the time it finds lock is '' (empty string), it actually fails to write the value to lock, but nevertheless returns ...


2

You have choosen the primary key as PRIMARY KEY (key, column1, column2, column3, column4, column5) so if you are going to give where clause on column5 then you should also need to specify the where clause of key, column1, column2, column3, column4. for eg, SELECT * FROM playerInfo WHERE KEY = 'Kitty' AND column1 = 1411 AND column2 = 3 AND column3 = 713 AND ...


2

No, with your schema it is not possible to achieve your goal. Cassandra does not support for like query. Answer of @catpaws is one of the solution to achieve your goal. What he is trying to say is, instead of using a single column (for column2) you can split into two columns (locationType and locationName) and make the locationType as one of the primary key ...


1

In Cassandra 2.1 and later: create table users ( username text, id int, location map, value int, PRIMARY KEY (username, id)); insert into users (username, id, location, value) VALUES ('Alice', 12, {'city': 'Boston'}, 100); insert into users (username, id, location, value) VALUES ('Tom', 13, {'city': 'New York'}, 200); insert into users (username, id, ...


1

When you use the RackInferringSnitch, the topology of the network is inferred by the octet of the node's IP address. You used the data center name DC1. You needed to use the second octet number of your node IP for the data center name when creating the keyspace. For example, 100 would be the name of the data center for node 110.100.200.105. Looks like this ...


1

Well if anyone is interested - I solved this by changing the snitch to PropertiesFileSnitch and deleted all the old data and restarted cassandra and things worked seamlessly. If anyone can shed some light as to why RackInferringSnitch didn't work that'd be appreciated. Cheers


1

Aggregate functions will be available as part of Cassandra 3.0 https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CASSANDRA-4914


4

Problem solved. I realized that I had not run "nodetool repair". Once I ran that the mysterious disappearance / reapparance stopped.


1

Since you do not have to maintain status history, I would suggest to have a single row for each bulb by the following primary key: PRIMARY KEY( (carmake, carmodel, carvin), bulbid) In order to query lightbulbs by status you need to create a secondary index: CREATE INDEX lightbulb_by_status ON lightbulbstatus (status); SELECT * FROM lightbulbstatus ...


0

Need to connect to cassandra and execute few commands (select / update ) with shell script You can execute your commands with shell script in next way: echo "some QUERY" > /tmp/QUERY; cqlsh CASSANDRA_HOST -u 'USER' -p 'PASS' < /tmp/QUERY


2

I think varchar is ok for the date field. For handling only dates without time information, the "Time Series Pattern 2" data model on Planet Cassandra uses the text type, which is just an alias for varchar, for its date field composite partition key component. http://planetcassandra.org/getting-started-with-time-series-data-modeling/ Although not exactly ...


0

Perform Business Logic at the App Layer There is no way to define / store a variable in CQL. This step should be taken care of at the app layer before you write to Cassandra using one of the datastax drivers. Are you just testing? If you're looking for a quick and dirty way to do this you could generate the cql commands in bash into a file and run: cqlsh ...


1

Carlo is correct in that your multiple table solution is the proper approach here. This does solve the problem but I have duplicated data in Cassandra now. ... Looking for a solution which requires only one table. Planet Cassandra recently posted an article on this topic: Escaping From Disco-Era Data Modeling (Full disclosure: I am the author) ...


2

The solution you're looking for does not exists. Two different queries requires two different tables (or at least a secondary index which creates a table under the hood). Denormalization is the norm in Cassandra so you should not think at data duplication as an anti-pattern -- indeed it's the suggested pattern


0

try wfs version 1.0.0 this request : ...


1

Try using the token function in CQL: http://www.datastax.com/documentation/cql/3.0/cql/cql_using/paging_c.html Another suggestion, if you are using DSE, solr supports deep paging: https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/solr/Pagination+of+Results


2

To directly answer your question, yes there is a way to accomplish this. As of Cassandra 2.1 you can create a secondary index on a collection. First, I'll re-create your column family definition (while adding a definition for upload_timestamp timeuuid) and put some values in it. aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT * FROM videos ; video_id ...


1

Just make your primary key (user,timestamp). This will make a separate partition for each user and each counter in the partition will be ordered by the timestamp of last event. create table counts( user varchar, last_event timestamp, event_count counter, primary key (user, last_event) ); Your partitions will look like ...


3

now() returns a timeuuid, not a timestamp. You clould try dateOf(now()). Have a read of this from the docs: dateOf and unixTimestampOf The dateOf and unixTimestampOf functions take a timeuuid argument and extract the embedded timestamp. However, while the dateof function return it with the timestamp type (that most client, including cqlsh, ...


1

Looks like you need to create a keyspace first: cqlsh> CREATE KEYSPACE excelsior ... WITH REPLICATION = { 'class' : 'SimpleStrategy', 'replication_factor' : 3 }; cqlsh> use excelsior; cqlsh:excelsior> CREATE TYPE address ( ... street text, ... city text, ... zip_code int, ... phones ...



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