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33

Here are both software and hardware versions of CRC-32C. The software version is optimized to process eight bytes at a time. The hardware version is optimized to run three crc32q instructions effectively in parallel on a single core, since the throughput of that instruction is one cycle, but the latency is three cycles. /* crc32c.c -- compute CRC-32C ...


31

You could use Ruby's Zlib module. require 'zlib' crc32 = Zlib::crc32('input field value')


31

Update I added a helper function to create the CRCTable instead of having this enormous literal in the code. It could also be used to create the table once and save it in an object or variable and have the crc32 function use that (or as W3C's example, check for the existence and create if necessary). I also updated the jsPerf to compare using a CRCtable ...


25

The SNIPPETS C Source Code Archive has a CRC32 implementation that is freely usable: /* Copyright (C) 1986 Gary S. Brown. You may use this program, or code or tables extracted from it, as desired without restriction.*/ (Unfortunately, c.snippets.org seems to have died. Fortunately, the Wayback Machine has it archived.) In order to be able to compile ...


21

It's not a research topic. It's really well understood: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclic_redundancy_check The math is pretty simple. An 8-bit CRC boils all messages down to one of 256 values. If your message is more than a few bytes long, the possibility of multiple messages having the same hash value goes up higher and higher. A 16-bit CRC, ...


19

Use the Boost C++ libraries. There is a CRC included there and the license is good.


16

I am the author of the source code at the specified link. While the intention of the source code license is not clear (it will be later today), the code is in fact open and free for use in your free or commercial applications with no strings attached.


16

It's only a matter of representation of the data : c74e16d9 is the hexadecimal representation and -951183655 is the decimal representation. And here's a portion of code to illustrate that : $crc = crc32('10f86782177490f2ac970b8dc4c51014'); var_dump($crc); var_dump(dechex($crc)); It'll display : int -951183655 string 'c74e16d9' (length=8) Which ...


16

CRC32 works very well as a hash algorithm. The whole point of a CRC is to hash a stream of bytes with as few collisions as possible. That said, there are a few points to consider: CRC's are not secure. For secure hashing you need a much more computationally expensive algorithm. For a simple bucket hasher, security is usually a non-issue. Different ...


15

Revisited, August 2014 Prompted by Arnaud Bouchez in a recent comment, and in view of other answers and comments, I acknowledge that the original answer needs to be altered or for the least qualified. I left the original as-is, at the end, for reference. First, and maybe most important, a fair answer to the question depends on the intended use of the hash ...


13

A CRC32 is only reversible if the original string is 4 bytes or less.


13

libz has a crc32() function. To use it with NSData, try this simple category: Your header: @interface NSData (CRC32) - (uint32_t)CRC32Value; @end Your implementation: #include "your header" #include <zlib.h> @implementation NSData (CRC32) - (uint32_t)CRC32Value { uLong crc = crc32(0L, Z_NULL, 0); crc = crc32(crc, [self bytes], [self ...


12

The crc code in zlib (http://zlib.net/) is among the fastest there is, and has a very liberal open source license. And you should not use adler-32 except for special applications where speed is more important than error detection performance.


11

The article referred to in other answers draws incorrect conclusions based on buggy crc32 code. Google's ranking algorithm does not rank based on scientific accuracy yet. Contrary to the referred article "Evaluating CRC32 for hash tables" conclusions, CRC32 and CRC32C are acceptable for hash table use. The author's sample code has a bug in the crc32 table ...


11

I think you are looking for binascii.a2b_hex(): >>> binascii.crc32(binascii.a2b_hex('18329a7e')) -1357533383


10

This guy seems to have your answer. http://damieng.com/blog/2006/08/08/Calculating_CRC32_in_C_and_NET And in case the blog ever goes away or breaks the url, here's the github link: https://github.com/damieng/DamienGKit/blob/master/CSharp/DamienG.Library/Security/Cryptography/Crc32.cs


10

Preface .NET [4 and previous] users should not use the Microsoft-provided GZipStream or DeflateStream classes under any circumstances, unless Microsoft replaces them completely with something that works. Use the DotNetZip library instead. Update to Preface The .NET Framework 4.5 and later have fixed the compression problem, and GZipStream and ...


10

Mark Adler's answer is correct and complete, but those seeking quick and easy way to integrate CRC-32C in their application might find it a little difficult to adapt the code, especially if they are using Windows and .NET. I've created a library that implements CRC-32C using either hardware or software method depending on available hardware. It's available ...


9

No, by definition a CRC32 has 32-bits. You can only vary its representation. For instance, while it can be represented with 4 8-bit bytes (and hence fits in a PHP int), you may wish to represent that number in base 10 in a string, and then it can have 10 characters (unsigned), since 2^32-1 is 4294967295.


9

Obviously you could, but you shouldn't. A crc32 poorly distributes the input bits to the hash. Also it certainly shouldn't ever be used as a one-way hash since it isn't one. It's very easy to modify a message to produce a given crc. Use a hash algorithm designed for the purpose you have in mind, whatever that is.


9

Only you can say whether 1-2-32 is good enough or not for your application. The error detection performance between a CRC-n and n bits from a good hash function will be very close to the same, so pick whichever one is faster. That is likely to be the CRC-n. Update: The above "That is likely to be the CRC-n" is only somewhat likely. It is not so likely ...


9

Try use BitConverter.ToInt32 method: var crcVal = BitConverter.ToInt32(crc32.ComputeHash(bytes), 0); EDIT It's seems you use different Crc32 algorithm implementation, try the following one: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Security.Cryptography; public class Program { public void Main() { // first convert ...


8

Well, basically it's just a CRC. The word running would mean that you are supposed to calculate it on-the-fly, as the data is incoming, or that you are doing a cumulative calculation (which is the way CRC is implemented). You have a good example: # Or you can compute the running CRC: $crc = 0; $crc = Archive::Zip::computeCRC32( 'abcdef', $crc ); ...


8

Found a snippet here that implements a compatible cksum in python: """ This module implements the cksum command found in most UNIXes in pure python. The constants and routine are cribbed from the POSIX man page """ import sys crctab = [ 0x00000000, 0x04c11db7, 0x09823b6e, 0x0d4326d9, 0x130476dc, 0x17c56b6b, 0x1a864db2, 0x1e475005, 0x2608edb8, ...


8

The 4 intrinsic functions provided really do allow all possible uses of the Intel defined CRC32 instruction. The instruction output always 32-bits because the instruction is hard-coded to use a specific 32-bit CRC polynomial. However, the instruction allows your code to feed input data to it 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits at a time. Processing 64-bits at a time ...


8

A quick search harvested this webpage. I wasn't able to find the license for these code snippets. The following should do the job: // ----------------------------- crc32b -------------------------------- /* This is the basic CRC-32 calculation with some optimization but no table lookup. The the byte reversal is avoided by shifting the crc reg right ...


8

Two's complement is not guaranteed by the standard; in clause 3.9.1: 7 - [...] The representations of integral types shall define values by use of a pure binary numeration system. [Example: this International Standard permits 2's complement, 1's complement and signed magnitude representations for integral types. — end example ] So any code that ...


7

I actually needed this exact same functionality recently for a work project. So this is what I have been able to figure out. The reason they do not match is because the Javascript implementation is not working on bytes. Using str.charCodeAt(i) will not always return a value 0-255 (in the case of Unicode characters it'll return a potentially much larger ...


7

No. Hashing algorithms are not reversible. You can't get back the original data, but you can get all possible sets of a specific length by calculating the hash for all possible combinations and compare to the hash that you have. This is of course imensely calculation intensive. Just ten bytes for example gives you 1 208 925 819 614 629 174 706 176 ...



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