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26

Here is how you can do it: var fooBars = Session.CreateCriteria<FooBar>() .Add(Restrictions.IsNotEmpty("Bazs")).List<FooBar>(); ...assuming there is a collection property (one-to-many) "Bazs" in the FooBar object. Alternatively you could use detached criteria like that: DetachedCriteria dCriteria = DetachedCriteria.For<Baz>("baz") ...


12

CreateAlias and CreateCriteria are identical in the current versions of Hibernate and NHibernate. The only difference being that CreateCriteria has 2 additional overloads without the alias parameter. Presumably they were different in a older version, but any differences are long gone. An alias can be defined in terms of another alias, so your first example ...


5

Having just solved a related problem and eventually arrived at a solution I thought I'd share the answer here: Assuming you want the original questions query, with an additional condition on the sub-query: SELECT * FROM FooBar fb WHERE EXISTS (SELECT FooBarId FROM Baz b WHERE b.FooBarId = fb.Id AND Quantity = 5) Assuming you have a ...


5

You will need to set Projection on specific properties. Example: criteria.setProjection( Projections.projectionList() .add( Projections.property("cat.name"), "catName" ) .add( Projections.property("kit.name"), "kitName" ) );


5

Yes, you are on the right track. I would also add the id property for the Post to my projections: projections { property('id') } and then collect all Posts using the id to get a list of posts, something like: def latestPosts = results?.collect{Post.read(it[0])}


5

There is no difference. You can/should use the generic one if possible, and non-generic if you have access only to a Type instance (some reflection). The non-generic is part of NHibernate from the moment when it was imported from Java Hibernate. The generic was added in the Build 2.1.0.Alpha1 release. But because the result is non-generic ICriteria (in ...


5

Use resultTransformer(). As the parameter use CriteriaSpecification.ALIAS_TO_ENTITY_MAP The documentation and examples on this topic is scarce. But here's an example: import org.hibernate.criterion.CriteriaSpecification BlogEntry.withCriteria { maxResults 5 resultTransformer(CriteriaSpecification.ALIAS_TO_ENTITY_MAP) projections { count('id', ...


4

First off, you can simplify your big switch by using a GString for the method name: case ~/^(?:eq|ne|gt|ge|lt|le)$/: "${rule['op']}"("${rule['field']}", rule['value']) break The same trick works for the and/or: "${(groupOp == 'or') ? 'or' : 'and'}"() { rulesList.each { rule -> switch(rule['op']){ ... } } } or you could assign ...


3

One option would be to define a formula field in your domain class. Something like: class SumFormula { Integer column1 Integer column2 Integer sum static mapping = { sum formula: 'column1 + column2' } } Then, you can apply criteria as follows: SumFormula.createCriteria().list() { ne("sum", 100) }


3

First of all convert your String to date using this method. def date = Date.parse('yyyy-MM-dd','2013-02-05') Now use today start and today end method. Date getTodayStart( Date inDate){ Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance() cal.set(inDate[Calendar.YEAR], inDate[Calendar.MONTH], inDate[Calendar.DATE], 0, 0, 0) Date todayStart = cal.getTime() ...


3

UPDATE: Post Grails 2.x, Criteria by default uses inner join, but for this particular case outer join has to be used as passenger association will not allow to follow or condition if it is an inner join and passenger is not set to car. import org.hibernate.Criteria def queryResults = Car.createCriteria().list() { createAlias('passenger', 'passenger', ...


3

Yes, there is an OR that you can use in this case. ccList { or { eq("cmd", false) isNull("cmd") } } The documentation has this and other options outlined.


3

HQL: List<Student> sortedStudents = session .CreateQuery( @"from Students student where student.Course == :course order by size(student.Feedbacks) * 3 + student.NumberOfStars") .SetEntity("course", course) .List<Student>(); size is a HQL function. See the chapter "Expressions" in the NH documentation. You may also select ...


3

Criteria queries aren't available in unit tests, and aren't provided by mockDomain. You can either mock your criteria queries yourself, e.g. with mockFor, or make your test an integration test, where you have access to a full database environment. Here's an example of how you could mock your query: mockFor(People).demand.static.createCriteria = { -> ...


3

Yes, you can use any sort of conditional or looping logic inside of the criteria DSL. Your example will work. Using loops can be incredibly useful, for example: Domain.createCriteria().list { params.mapOfConditions.each { eq it.key, it.val } } will dynamically add an eq for each entry in the map that you have.


3

make a class that has only the properties you need, often this is a summary class like {Id, Label} and you'd reuse it anywhere you need a simple type, in a listing for example. Use ProjectionList to define which columns to return. Then use Transformers.AliasToBean to transform the result to your simple type. ProjectionList projectionList = ...


3

You're trying to do a cartesian product here. I think NHibernate requires mapping the relations as sets instead of bags to do that, since bags allow duplicates. Anyway, cartesian products are very inefficient. Use a multi-query or future queries instead. See: Nhibernate: eager loading two child collections (one being a component list) ...


3

Use CreateAlias outside the Disjunction(). var result = session.CreateCriteria<Property>() .CreateAlias("Cities", "city") .CreateAlias("Countries", "country") .Add(Restrictions.Disjunction() .Add(Expression.Like("city.Name", query, MatchMode.Anywhere)) .Add(Expression.Like("city.SlovenianNam", query, MatchMode.Anywhere)) ...


2

You can do this using Projections: IList<Object[]> list = session.CreateCriteria(typeof(Employee)) .SetProjection(Projections.ProjectionList() .Add(Projections.Property("FirstName")) .Add(Projections.Property("LastName")) ).List<Object[]>(); foreach( Object[] person in list ) { String firstName = person[0]; String ...


2

You can try this def authors{ results = Message.createCriteria().list { projections { author{ groupProperty('id') property('username') } } and{ ... ... } } List authors = results.collect{record -> [authorId : record[0], ...


2

Build the criteria on the fly: def neededAmenities = ... PagedResultList pgl = Hotel.createCriteria().list(max: limit, offset: offset) { // .. amenities { and { neededAmenities.each { needed -> idEq (needed.id) } } } } In pure SQL, it's not much easier: where exists(amenities.id == ...


2

Duplicate: Grails queries with criteria: how to get back a map with column? And the corresponding answer (and solution): http://stackoverflow.com/a/16409512/1263227 Use resultTransformer. import org.hibernate.criterion.CriteriaSpecification Trade.withCriteria { resultTransformer(CriteriaSpecification.ALIAS_TO_ENTITY_MAP) projections { ...


2

Various key points to look at: First, Validate the params to see whether userName ans/or userNumber is passed, ans send back a message to user to provide valid information. By this way you are eradicating the option of user input error. Using Criteria returns back a list of domain objects. You have to iterate over the list to get the ...


2

you join by creating sub criteria var criteria = Session.CreateCriteria(typeof(Store)); var join = criteria.CreateCriteria("Employees"); join.Add(Restrictions.Not(Restrictions.Eq("SomeStatus1", true)); return criteria.List<Store>(); Untested (obv) hope it works, but you get the idea. That's how I do it with N:1 but you have 1:N EDIT: Ok, I did a ...


2

Please refer to the following source code from the Hibernate public Criteria createCriteria(String associationPath, String alias, int joinType) { return new Subcriteria( this, associationPath, alias, joinType ); } public Criteria createAlias(String associationPath, String alias, int joinType) { new Subcriteria( this, associationPath, alias, ...


1

Agree with your question reasoning, this really should be part of the core GORM solution. That said, here's my workaround; def props = ['name','phone'] def query = Person.where {}.projections { props.each{ property(it) } } def people = query.list().collect{ row-> def cols = [:] row.eachWithIndex{colVal, ...


1

Databases commonly handle null values as special cases that don't match arithmetic operations such as '='/eq. So in your case, I'm going to make some assumptions that you can correct if I'm wrong: username is a nullable field userNumber is a nullable field A user must have at least a username or userNumber (sort of bizarre data model, but let's go with ...


1

You can have conditions inside a criteria. Also I think you need only one result (username and userNumber are unique?), so you can use get() instead of list() def user = userSearch.get { if(params.username) { eq('username',params.username) } if(params.userNumber) { eq('userNumber',params.userNumber) } }


1

If your database column is of type Date then you should not have problem using the way @Kamil has suggested. Although, there is a groovier way of parsing the date string to date. def date = Date.parse('yyyy-MM-dd','2013-02-05') assert date instanceof java.util.Date


1

Above example works good because both of othere classes are the constitutions of Property class. If it is in this order it doesn't work. class Property{ public virtual int Id { get; set; } publice virtual string name { get; set;} Public virtual City city {get; set;} //many to one } class City { public virtual int Id { get; set; } ...



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