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1940

This article about that might interest you: John Resig - ECMAScript 5 Strict Mode, JSON, and More To quote some interesting parts: Strict Mode is a new feature in ECMAScript 5 that allows you to place a program, or a function, in a "strict" operating context. This strict context prevents certain actions from being taken and throws more exceptions. ...


547

It's a new feature of ECMAScript5. John Resig wrote up a nice summary of it. It's just a string you put in your js files (either at the top of your file or inside of a function) that looks like this: "use strict"; Putting it in your code now shouldn't cause any problems with current browsers as it's just a string. It may cause problems with your code ...


417

Crockford has done a lot to popularize good JavaScript techniques. His opinionated stance on key elements of the language have sparked many useful discussions. That said, there are far too many people that take each proclamation of "bad" or "harmful" as gospel, refusing to look beyond one man's opinion. It can be a bit frustrating at times. Use of the ...


122

If people are worried about using use strict it might be worth checking out this article: http://www.novogeek.com/post/ECMAScript-5-Strict-mode-support-in-browsers-What-does-this-mean.aspx It talks about browser support, but more importantly how to deal with it safely: function isStrictMode(){ return !this; } //returns false, since 'this' refers to ...


120

I have just read some parts of his Crockfords book "Javascript: The Good Parts". I get the feeling that he considers everything that ever has bitten him as harmful: About switch fall through: I never allow switch cases to fall through to the next case. I once found a bug in my code caused by an unintended fall through immediately after having ...


75

Javascript being dynamic language there a zillion ways to mess up where another language would stop you. Avoiding a fundamental language feature such as new on the basis that you might mess up is a bit like removing your shiny new shoes before walking through a minefield just in case you might get your shoes muddy. I use a convention where function names ...


41

The real reason about why JSON keys should be in quotes, relies in the semantics of Identifiers of ECMAScript 3. Reserved words cannot be used as property names in Object Literals without quotes, for example: ({function: 0}) // SyntaxError ({if: 0}) // SyntaxError ({true: 0}) // SyntaxError // etc... While if you use quotes the property names are valid: ...


35

I am newbie to Javascript so maybe I am just not too experienced in providing a good view point to this. Yet I want to share my view on this "new" thing. I have come from the C# world where using the keyword "new" is so natural that it is the factory design pattern that looks weird to me. When I first code in Javascript, I don't realize that there is the ...


30

Another case for new is what I call Pooh Coding. Winnie the Pooh follows his tummy. I say go with the language you are using, not against it. Chances are that the maintainers of the language will optimize the language for the idioms they try to encourage. If they put a new keyword into the language they probably think it makes sense to be clear when ...


29

Your function has no object context, so this references to the global window object in this case. Every property you assign to this automatically pollutes the global namespace. (function() { console.log(this == window); // true this.publicMethod = function () { alert('This is a public method.'); } })(); console.log(publicMethod); // ...


28

The statement is ridiculous. continue can be abused, but it often helps readability. Typical use: for (somecondition) { if (!firsttest) continue; some_provisional_work_that_is_almost_always_needed(); if (!further_tests()) continue; do_expensive_operation(); } The goal is to avoid 'lasagna' code, where you have deeply nested ...


26

1) Object.create() starts out by creating an empty function called F. I'm thinking that a function is a kind of object. Where is this F object being stored? Globally I guess. No, it's stored on the local scope of the Object.create function, each time you invoke Object.create this function F will be recreated. You could even create a more ...


26

I strongly recommend every developer to start using strict mode now. There are enough browsers supporting it that strict mode will legitimately help save us from errors we didn’t even know where in your code. Apparently, at initial stage there will be errors we have never encountered before. To get full benefit, we need to do a proper testing after switching ...


19

Crockford gives an example for an object creation function as should have been provided by JS itself in one of his Javascript talks available on http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/ However, the YUI(3) team itself uses "new", and they DO follow his recommendations (since he's the Yahoo chief JS architect (UPDATE: he moved on, but the statement was true ...


17

Firstly: Callback: A function passed as an argument to another function, usually to be called as a result of an event occurring. Closure: A retained scope. I.e. the concept that when you declare a function within another function, the outer function's scope is accessible within the inner function. Callbacks can also be closures, but are not always. ...


17

A word of caution, all you hard-charging programmers: applying "use strict" to existing code can be hazardous! This thing is not some feel-good, happy-face sticker that you can slap on the code to make it 'better'. With the "use strict" pragma, the browser will suddenly THROW exceptions in random places that it never threw before just because at that spot ...


16

I think "new" adds clarity to the code. And clarity is worth everything. Good to know there are pitfalls, but avoiding them by avoiding clarity doesn't seem like the way for me.


16

The rationale behind not using the new keyword, is simple: By not using it at all, you avoid the pitfall that comes with accidentally omitting it. The construction pattern that YUI uses, is an example of how you can avoid the new keyword altogether" var foo = function () { var pub= { }; return pub; } var bar = foo(); Alternatively you could so ...


16

I wrote a post on how to mitigate the problem of calling a constructor without the new keyword. It's mostly didactic, but it shows how you can create constructors that work with or without new and doesn't require you to add boilerplate code to test this in every constructor. http://js-bits.blogspot.com/2010/08/constructors-without-using-new.html Here's ...


13

The issue is that it's referring to the name of the constructor function. This quickly becomes a discussion about function expressions and statements and the name property. Turns out is is completely impossible to create a new named function at runtime without using eval. Names can only be specified using a function statement function fnName(){} and it's not ...


13

If you use a browser released in the last year or so then it most likely supports JavaScript Strict mode. Only older browsers around before ECMAScript 5 became the current standard don't support it. The quotes around the command make sure that the code will still work in older browsers as well (although the things that generate a syntax error in strict ...


12

Case 1: new isn't required and should be avoided var str = new String('asd'); // type: object var str = String('asd'); // type: string var num = new Number(12); // type: object var num = Number(12); // type: number Case 2: new is required, otherwise you'll get an error new Date().getFullYear(); // correct, returns the current year, ...


11

Let's say you want a function that you can use to return a unique "id" value to use when you create new DOM elements. Now, in something like Java, you could create a class with an internal private counter, and then have a method that appends the counter to some prefix string. Well, in Javascript: var getId = (function() { var counter = 0; return ...


11

It's just a language grammar limitation. Since 1. is a legal literal number (and 1.t is not) the tokeniser will split this into the following tokens: 1. toString ( ) And that's an illegal sequence of tokens. It's object method, instead of object . method. In the working versions in @Joey's answer, the braces prevent the tokenizer from treating the dot ...


10

I think this is a very common source of confusion for newcomers to JavaScript. First I would suggest checking out the following Mozilla Dev article for brief introduction on the topic of closures and lexical scoping: Mozilla Dev Center: Working with Closures Let's start with the bad one: var add_the_handlers = function (nodes) { // Variable i is ...


9

Yes, it's invalid JSON and will be rejected otherwise in many cases, for example jQuery 1.4+ has a check that makes unquoted JSON silently fail. Why not be compliant? Let's take another example: { myKey: "value" } { my-Key: "value" } { my-Key[]: "value" } ...all of these would be valid with quotes, why not be consistent and use them in all cases, ...


9

Not using new and blindly following Crockford is silly. Understand JavaScript and write good code. Using the new keyword is the Cornerstone of JavaScript OO. You are going to miss out on a lot of good JavaScript code by avoiding new. Rather than arbitrarily cutting huge chunks out of your toolkit, learn it and use it properly instead. Crockford has a ...


8

The problem is that tbase.BicData is an object (tbase.BicData = Object.create(tData);), and the prototype property should be used on constructor functions. Taking advantage of the Object.create method, I would do something like this: var tbase = {}; tbase.Tdata = { say : function (data) { console.log(data); } }; tbase.BicData = ...


8

Maybe it's because of Internet Explorer's perpetually buggy implementation of lookaheads. For anyone authoring a book about JavaScript, any feature that doesn't work in IE might as well not exist.


8

"Use Strict"; is an insurance that programmer will not use the loose or the bad properties of JavaScript, it is a guide, just like a ruler will help you make straight lines, "Use Strict" will help you do "Straight coding". Those that prefer not to use rulers to do their lines straight usually end up in those pages asking for others to debug their codes. ...



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