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4

You're expecting this: 01 * * * * login sh ~/delete.sh to run the command every minute. In fact, it only runs it at one minute past each hour. Change it to this: * * * * * login sh ~/delete.sh To address issues raised in the comments: Cron jobs run with a limited $PATH, but /bin is certain to be in that $PATH, so there's no need to replace sh by ...


3

Avoid using commands directly on crontab, you probably have a directory /etc/cron.hourly and crontab already have call to run all the scripts in the specific folders, in determined intervals, hourly, daily for example Then, inside /etc/cron.hourly you can create a monitor.sh, set the execution privilege of this script with chmod +x ...


3

If you want to do it in one command: PGPASSWORD="mypass" pg_dump mydb > mydb.dump


3

Try setting the PATH in your cronjob file In my case, echo $PATH /usr/lib64/qt-3.3/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/root/bin Add the Path in your crontab : crontab -e PATH=/usr/lib64/qt-3.3/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/root/bin 30 5 * * * runmyscript You can check this question ...


2

Running things under Cron can be a little tricky: it starts in the crontab user's $HOME directory. If there's an errors.log file there, it might not work. Check the permissions. I've never seen ext://sys.stdout format before. Cron routes stdout to email, which tends not to work. I suggest routing all messages to /tmp/myscript.log -- it's easier to ...


2

Try as follows: rm $(ls -1t /tmp/BACKUP_DIR | tail -n +2) Listing sorted by date names of files with remaining only two newest


2

You have a relative path specified in your script, but you don't start in your home directory from the cronjob. Use absolute paths in your bash script.


2

You can put variables into your crontab file and use them in your command: DATE_STRING =date +%s */1 * * * * /usr/bin/php -q /home/hduser/Documents/WebCrawl-ProtestData/preg_match.php > /home/hduser/Documents/cronoutput_$($DATE_STRING).txt In this case I create a string of the date command and evaluate in the filename (adding an epoch timestamp to ...


2

add '-i' switch to your ssh command in your command line: rsync --progress -rvze "ssh -i/path/to/ssh_private_key" my_user@myserver:/root_folder folder/


2

I suppose cron uses the sh shell to run your commands by default. sh does not support curly-brace wildcards. IIRC, you can add to your crontab the following line: SHELL=/bin/bash


2

From the man page for crontab(5): Step values can be used in conjunction with ranges. Following a range with ``/'' specifies skips of the number's value through the range. Basically, what this means is that values are used at 0-based indexes that are divisible by <number>. For dom, * is the same as 1-31. So */3 is 1-31/3. Which means it'll ...


2

Not meaning to detract from the timely answer given by Victor, but the "one liner" form of this would be: mongo --quiet --eval 'var db = db.getSiblingDB("database"); print( "value=" + db.collection.count() );' | curl -X POST http://countersrv.com/[edit endpoint] -d @- The --quiet suppresses the startup message on the shell and --eval alows the commands ...


2

This happens when you run the script with a different shell. It's especially relevant for systems where /bin/sh is dash: $ cat myscript echo "$(< file)" $ bash myscript hello world $ sh myscript $ To fix it, add #!/bin/bash as the first line in your script.


1

--display=localhost:0 can be causing error , Following code will also do the trick 57 12 * * * export DISPLAY=:0 && /usr/bin/gedit There is a reason why i added entire path of gedit , Utilities in /bin and /usr/bin can be opened using cron just by specifying its name so /usr/bin/gedit or just gedit will work. May a time command you use to ...


1

If you want to add a comment (#) at a particular line you can use - Third line: sed '3s/^/#/' filename You can save this as new file or use output redirections.


1

That's kinda dangerous in my book, I wouldn't recommend doing that. Instead, I'd update your script so that it creates a file (like /tmp/MY_SCRIPT_LOCK or whatever) at the start and removes the file at the end. Then just update the cron job so it doesn't run if it finds the file: 0 * * * * test -f /tmp/MY_SCRIPT_LOCK || /home/tomcat/abc.sh


1

The following question suggests that you should use absolute paths instead of relying on ~ to expand to your home directory. Also make sure cron is actually running. You can do this by grepping for the cron process. On Ubuntu Linux, I usually use the following command. ps aux | grep cron


1

ah, it's one of the warts of Python. Add this to suppress the messages: import logging logging.getLogger('deluge').addHandler(logging.NullHandler()) Or write everything to stderr: import logging, sys logging.basicConfig(stream=sys.stderr, level=logging.DEBUG)


1

It would be easier to use the following crontab entry with a wrapper script that skips the run if the current time is before 30 minutes past midnight. */15 * * * * your_wrapper_script.sh Another option is to split the cronjob into 2 entries: 30,45 0 * * * your_original_cron_job */15 1-23 * * * your_original_cron_job


1

You could try deleting files older that 7 days using a find command, for example : find /tmp/BACKUP_DIR -maxdepth 1 -type f -name "backup_*.tar" -mtime +6 -exec rm -f {} \;


1

The issue is cron jobs do not run as your user exactly as you are when you login via the terminal. This is because when you login as an actual user, your user shell profile—stored in .profile, .bash_profile or bashrc—is loaded in as part of the login process. So user settings—such as system paths—are loaded in your session that you might not even be aware ...


1

The problem is a classic one with crontab. When you log to a unix like system, your shell reads at least your profile and/or system profile and depending on shell other init files. These init files usually set PATH and various environment strings. But when a shell is started through crontab, none of these initializations occurs. So you have to : either ...


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As phantom is probably installed in /usr/local/bin, you should add that dir to PATH in your crontab. The following should do the trick: SHELL=/bin/sh PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin


1

Take a look at RFC 2616 - Caching in HTTP. You even don't need to download file and check the Modified Time. You can easily send a request with HEAD method. (not POST or GET) then check some HTTP Response headers like: Etag You can save ETag for each entity and save it somewhere in your server. Then check if ETag has changed, send a GET request to ...


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Others have provided answers, but I will give you a big clue from your error message; emphasis mine: /bin/sh: 1: /home/pi/MyScripts/test.sh: Permission denied. Note how the cron job was trying to use /bin/sh to run the script. That’s solved by always indicating which shell you want to use at the top of your script like this. #!/bin/bash ...



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