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create a crontab file like this crontab -e [username] put an entry 0 */1 * * * /home/yourscript.sh


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Here is how I run one of my cron containers. Dockerfile: FROM alpine:3.3 ADD crontab.txt /crontab.txt ADD script.sh /script.sh COPY entry.sh /entry.sh RUN chmod 755 /script.sh /entry.sh RUN /usr/bin/crontab /crontab.txt CMD ["/entry.sh"] crontab.txt */30 * * * * /script.sh >> /var/log/script.log entry.sh #!/bin/sh # start cron ...


4

The problem here is that you are using this shebang: #!/bin/sh Whereas arrays are something Bash specific that shell does not allow. So to make it work, change the shebang of your script to Bash: #!/bin/bash


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Specify your interpreter explicitly in the crontab entry. Use bash /path/zero_check.sh rather than /path/zero_check.sh


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You can run your command by typing the following line in your crontab editor: * * * * * /usr/bin/php /path/to/your/app/protected/yiic.php yourcommandname argument1 argument2 ... Good luck!


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Can you try the date formatting with a single quotes and see if it helps?


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The issue is that cron doesn't get your env. There are several ways of approaching this. Either running a bash script that includes your profile. Or a nice simple solution would be to include it with crontab. (change profile to whatever you are using) 0 5 * * * . $HOME/.profile; /path/to/command/to/run check out this thread


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make it executable first, using chmod +x ~/csv_file/write_csv2/filename.r and the execute it using ./filename.r


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For example, if you need to run it each 5 minutes everyday from 10h to 16h: */5 10-16 * * * /dostuff.sh


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your crontab config is correct. But you can add add all into one script and run also. vi main.sh ./etc/rip_first_radio.sh & ./etc/rip_second_radio.sh & ./etc/rip_third_radio.sh & ./etc/rip_fourth_radio.sh & and add main.sh to cron. 0 13 * * * ./main.sh


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If you check in crontab.guru, both of these are almost equivalent: * * * * * * 1/0 * * * This is because X/Y means: starting from X, every Y. That is, all X + Yn. So if you say */2 it will do every 2 hours. In this case: 1/0 means "starting from 1, every hour", so it matches from 1 to 23, whereas * matches from 0 to 23. Following your question, */6 ...


4

The first monday of the month is the only monday that occurs during the first seven days of the month. Thus, to execute the job at 1:02 AM, use: 2 1 1-7 * * test $(date +\%u) -eq 1 && path/to/my/script.sh The first two items, the numbers 1 and 2, set the minute and hour. The third item, 1-7, sets the allowed range for the day of the month. The ...


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The crontab syntax does not make it possible to define all possible periods one could image off. For example, it is not straightforward to define the last weekday of a month or the first Monday of each month as you mentioned. Then, the best approach would be to make script.sh to check it. Use something like this: if [ $(date +\%e) != $(ncal | ...


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Yes, cronjobs can run at the same time, and will do so if you set them up that way. A 1 minute gap between each of the jobs might work, but what if one of them takes longer than a minute to run? I would recommend explicitly calling them all in order: 0 * * * * joba.sh && jobb.sh && jobc.sh && jobd.sh Note that this has the ...


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One way of doing it (via command line arguments passed by cron) some_script.sh: if test $1 = 1 ; then # echo "1 was entered" java -jar some_file.jar elif test $1 = 2 ; then # echo "2 was entered" java -jar another_file.jar fi crontab example: * 1 * * * /bin/bash /home/username/some_script.sh 1 * 2 * * * /bin/bash ...


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So, after a few hours of searching I realised something stupid. I had left out the 'bash' command from the crontab file. I changed my line to this: root bash /home/backup/test.sh And it is now running.


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As seen in comments, the problem is that you are not defining what program should be used to execute the script. Take into account that a cronjob is executed in a tiny environment; there, not much can be assumed. This is why we define full paths, etc. So you need to say something like: 1 * * * * /bin/sh /var/www/html/dbsync/dbsync.sh /var/www/html/dbsync # ...


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Remember if you are using crontab, to use the full path to the python script. In debian you can type pwd in the terminal to show the path to your current location. Assuming the python script is also located in /home/mc/ you should use the command: /home/mc/overviewer.py --config /home/mc/test.cfg I would suggest you look into crontab again, the ubuntu ...


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It worked after adding -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no sshpass -p 'password' ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no user@server "touch /tmp/test"


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A possible solution just to check that it was correctly executed is to wait a returncode. Here the link to subprocess module: https://docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html You can wait the return code in you script: if (subprocess.call(command, args) == 0): print("We are proceeding) else: print("Something went wrong executing %s" % command) ...


1

since crontab file is not actually what is running when a task is being triggered what you will to do would not work since cron tasks are run from the cron daemon. A solution to beautify the commands a bit would be to add the path were the actual scripts are to the PATH env variable on the crontab file ...


0

The are a few options here, depending on GET/POST request: GET Request: * * * * * * /usr/bin/GET http://www.example.com?foo=1 >/dev/null 2>&1 * * * * * * /usr/bin/wget -O - http://www.example.com/file.php?foo=1 >/dev/null 2>&1 Or POST: * * * * * * /usr/bin/curl --data "foo=1" http://www.example.com/file.php >/dev/null 2>&1 ...


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Instead of trying to use a cli browser, use curl instead, with which you will be able to send POST parameters as well if you need to.


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I think this is the simplest way to get codeigniter working under cron job, You can use curl in cron jobs to execute or run the codeigniter in cron jobs Example: /usr/bin/curl https://www.domain.com/controller/function I used this way, but I did not get curl in DB.


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Is /home/vipul/vpcron/datevarinc.sh executable? If not change crontab to * * * * * sh /home/vipul/vpcron/datevarinc.sh If it is take a look into /var/log/syslog which is the usual log file for cron jobs and check for errors. Edit: And it should be echo $val > $input.


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The solution is: apk add --update busybox-suid


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So if I understand correctly, you run some script as cronjob; so somewhere in that script you can say: X=`cat file` or you can add cat file | grep for something to get just one line from your file and later use $X for expected input.


0

First, the executable must be provided as full path in cron. Example: 7 * * * * /bin/bash /path/to/pinging.sh Second, create a wrapper script for pinging.sh >> pingdata.log and add that to crontab. Third, your crontab entry is wrong. There must be 5 fields whereas your's have 4 (maybe that's a typo ?)


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You need to indicate the full path of your script in the cronjob, together with the binary running it. For example: 7 * * * * /bin/sh /home/you/pinging.sh >> /home/you/pingdata.log Note also you are just adding 4 parameters to the cronjob, whereas you need at least 5: +---------------- minute (0 - 59) | +------------- hour (0 - 23) | | ...


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It might be worth mentioning that cron is still supported by OSX but it has been deprecated in favor of launchd. To create a launchd job, you need to create a "plist" file giving all needed information to run the script and place it in folder ~/Library/LaunchAgents. Here's an example plist file: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE ...


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In Terminal, open the crontab with: sudo crontab -e Press i to go into insert mode. Add the following line: 0 */23 * * * Rscript /path/to/file/JASON.r Press Esc to leave insert mode. Type ZZ You should see the following message: crontab: installing new crontab. You can verify the crontab file by using crontab -l. Misc: This will run the file ...


0

This could be because your not in the same execution context. Depending on which shell you are running (adapt my old-school .kshrc), you might need to prefix the command with a source /home/myuser/.kshrc, like below: */5 * * * * source /home/myuser/.kshrc ; /usr/bin/wget "http://localhost:8080/sample/index.jsp" --post-data "data=$(nohup sqoop import ...


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Use this command: H 5 * * * This will set the cron to run the job at 5am PST in crontab.


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You have to use full paths in crontab, since it does not have same value of $PATH as your shell (ie use full path for nohup, sqoop )


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To run via root's crontab at reboot, type: sudo crontab -e And add this line: @reboot mount -t cifs 'folderpath' 'pointtomount' -o username=xxx,password=xxx,sec=ntlm But really, shouldn't you be adding your auto-mounts to /etc/fstab?


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You can run it in a server which is on all day and everyday. You can get a free server hosting on sites like this: https://www.5gbfree.com/ This way, if you have sick days where you won't even think to open your laptop, the cron jobis still running in the server anyway.


2

Couple things here, first off every user can have their own crontab. For example: crontab -e # Edit crontab of current user crontab -u root -e # Edit crontab of root user (might need sudo for this) crontab -u www-data -e # Edit crontab of www-data user Another thing is that if you don't use crontab -e to edit the file, and actually edit the /etc/crontab ...


0

My problem was that the crontab did not have a full environment. I made the script it was pointing to source my .bashrc. @reboot /home/user/www/example.com/bin/server ./server does . /home/user/.bashrc to get a working environment.


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If you think /home/user hasn't been mounted (or some required systems aren't running) yet, in your crontab line, you can always wait before executing a command like: @reboot sleep 60; /home/user/www/example.com/bin/server


0

You need to see the output of the cron execution for any clues, not just running it from terminal. Perhaps there are some permission/ownership errors or something along those lines. From the cron execution, you can send output to a file to view: 0 * * * * python /home/pi/Documents/Project/Base_Prog.py 1> /dev/null 2> ...


0

This line/code in your crontab: http://www.mywebsite.com/update1.php is not an execution of the script, it's just the url to it. You should download the php script, and put it locally on your linux server. That would make things simpler and much more reliable. I would login to your linux server, use wget to download the script, chmod it to make sure ...


1

In the given code the script will always process from the beginning, since no pointer of some sort is kept. My suggestion would be to split the CSV file into pieces and let another script parse the pieces one by one (i.e. every 5 minutes). (and delete the file afterwards). $fp = fopen(CSV, 'r'); $head = fgets($fp); $output = [$head]; while (!feof($fp)) ...


0

You can use --spider option of wget for this purpose. 0 8 * * * wget --spider http://www.mywebsite.com/update1.php --spider indicates not to download anything (we just want to go through the pages, that’s all)


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Enter tty on any terminal and we will get device file for that particular teminal window like /dev/pts/1. Redirct the cron job into this file as cleanup.sh > /dev/pts/1


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Run cat /home/darkknight/cleanup.log then you get the output on STDOUT. If you can't see what you expect as output, maybe you need to modify the cron as following: 0 9 * * * /bin/sh /bin/cleanup.sh > /home/darkknight/cleanup.log 2>&1 To get what cleanup.sh writes on its STDERR. If you don't want to lose the output of yesterday, modify as ...


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So very likely cron is a daemon that is executed by user cron in your system. When the cron daemon decides to run a cronjob, it does so as the cron user. But very likely the cron user is not allowed to sudo in your system, so this accounts for the mentioned sudo error (as sudo usually asks for a password on forbidden uses, but in this case there is no ...



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