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2

This rule: $(BUILDDIR)/%.o: %.c describes to make how to create a file $(BUILDDIR)/foo.o from foo.c. But you now want to compile a .cpp file. Just changing the compiler variable in the recipe from $(CC) to $(CXX) doesn't change description of targets or prerequisites! You need to add a new rule telling make how to compile your .cpp files: ...


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Ok, I came up with solution. Instead of doing Env.StaticLibrary() I was doing StaticLibrary() which ignored all Env variables.


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--enable-mpbsd This builds the Berkeley MP compatibility library This was potentially useful 20 years ago, but it hasn't been for a long time, which is why it was removed from GMP. Linux From Scratch is wrong to recommend the use of that option, it was never required (though it didn't hurt). Please contact them so they can update their ...


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Well, Thank you to Martin Schlott who tried my program on his compiler and it worked with text files from either Windows or Linux sources. This pointed me to the compiler differences and that was the key. The cross-compiler installed by apt-get install mingw32 put an older compiler (v4.2.1) for the cross-compile but the apt-get install g++ put the linux ...


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If the toolchain skips your Makefile entirely, most probably you haven't run make menuconfig. So generally the steps are: Place your openWRT Makefile into openwrt/package/name folder run make menuconfig in the pop-up dialog choose the package you want to compile by putting either an M or * next to it. run make package/name/compile you'll find the .ipk ...


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It seems this was a caching issue after all - building in a clean directory fixed the problem. Though I still wonder how did it become an empty string...


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Perhaps you might want to look at how NetBSD builds. Its build system is portable to almost any POSIX-compatible host, including most any (if not all) GNU/Linux systems. It first builds a cross-compiler and other tools (including the linker originally from binutils), then uses that to build target system libraries, then it builds all the rest of the ...


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For arm-linux-engeabi, the symbol "__aeabi_unwind_cpp_pr0" is defined in libc++.a. It looks like you need to add -lc++ to your link command line (before the -lc) or use ecc++ rather than ecc to link your program. It works for x86_64 because the missing function is ARM specific, of course.


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The gcc-arm toolchain I'm using for ARM Cortex-M processors can be found here- https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded It also builds for Cortex-A targets, which should cover the majority of embedded ARM systems. You can download standalone distributions for many operating systems, including linux.


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Solve, It would work fine with bcm2835-1.44 library.



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