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When you run csh -x it echoes each command to stderr. If you turn on -x and run your script like this .... >sh sh-3.2$ csh -x test.csh 2>catch_stderr -----------WITH &----------------------- ARRAY: ./ff ./ff.csh ./test.csh FIRST ELEMENT FROM ARRAY1: ./ff ------------WITHOUT &----------------------- ARRAY2 ./ff ./ff.csh ./test.csh FIRST ELEMENT ...


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Variable -x applies for subshells also. So when subshell `find "'"$dirs"'" -type f |& grep -v '^find: '` gets executed it echoes find . -type f onto stderr (this is not captured by 2> not sure why, but it's not in my case) and then executes it, but the |& combines stderr and stdout and this combination gets substituted in the script. So the find . ...


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The arguments are script dependent so might mean anything. However, you can reasonably assume the option-force is telling the script to complete even while that would overwrite or remove something. There are more variations to expect with -d but it is often used to set the script in debug mode. Have a look to the script shell content to figure out the ...


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The syntax you're using is for bash, ksh, zsh and a few others. Csh has it's own syntax for assigning to variables AND doesn't support the $( cmd ...) form of process substitution. Try #! /bin/csh -f set var = `pwd` echo "$var" Note that to do the equivalent of export var=x, you would do setenv var `pwd` And as @Carpetsmoker reminds us, [t]csh ...



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