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9

exec /bin/ksh or: exec /bin/bash -l See: Csh Programming Considered Harmful See also: What Linux shell should I use?


7

This page has a pretty good explanation, although the syntax is a bit different in csh. Here's what I came up with: set prompt="%{\e[32;1m%}%n%{\e[37m%}@%{\e[33m%}%m%{\e[37m%}:%{\e[36m%}%~%{\e[37m%}"\$"%{\e[0m%} " # root variation: set prompt="%{\e[31;1m%}root%{\e[37m%}@%{\e[33m%}%m%{\e[37m%}:%{\e[36m%}%/%{\e[37m%}#%{\e[0m%} " update: the previous prompt ...


4

In general, you shouldn't do anything that invokes an interactive application or produces visible output in your .cshrc. The problem is that .cshrc is sourced for non-interactive shells. And since your default shell is csh, you're going to have csh invoked non-interactively in a lot of cases -- as you've seen with scp. Instead, I'd just invoke bash -- or, ...


3

The shebang is used to tell which interpreter should be used for this script. For this to work, the magic number #! has to appear at the immediate beginning of the file. Otherwise, the default interpreter is used. In this case, the shebang was preceded by a few empty lines. They have to be removed. The shebang is not parsed when an explicit interpreter is ...


3

Use chsh command to change your default login shell. Print the list of shells available: chsh -l Change default shell: chsh -s /bin/bash <username> Get the default login shell of the current user: getent passwd <username> | cut -d: -f7


3

The PATH variable is a list of directories to be searched, you need setenv PATH {$PATH}:/home/srinadel/bin IHTH


3

alias m0 'set d0 = `pwd`' alias m1 'set d1 = `pwd`' ... alias g0 'cd $d0' alias g1 'cd $d1' ... Typing m0 saves the current working directory (in d0) and g0 returns to that directory.


2

To my knowledge FreeBSD comes with tcsh by default. Have a look at the examples. Another list for other shells as well (bash, csh, tcsh, ksh, etc.) is available. Taken from that link and tested with tcsh (I do not have csh installed): To color the prompt you will want to place this symbol in your prompt. %{\033[Xm%}. Certain colors need a semicolon ...


2

Surround the hostname command with backtics to execute it and compare the result. if(`hostname` == 'login1.university.edu') then setenv R_LIBS_USER /n/Users/me/R.login1 else


1

When you source your file that assignment line is being run. It is prepending that static value to the current value of the $LD_LIBRARY_PATH variable. Source the file three times in a row and you'll add that path to the front three times. There isn't a "default" value you can revert to (unless you save one yourself and be careful with it). In short you get ...


1

It seems that you were using bash, not csh family shells. When you ran command source .cshrc, it used bash way to process .cshrc; .cshrc is just the input file, regardless of its file name, so you need to either run csh family shells or use bash syntax for the instructions in .cshrc. (I wouldn't suggest the later way, as it could be confusing.) If you ...


1

The purpose of .cshrc is to run on shell startup. If you want a file that only runs when explicitly sourced, name it something else.


1

Running this su - user_y will login as user y and run the startup scripts, whatever they are. Running this su user_y will make you "become" user y but will not run the startup scripts. This is not cshell specific.


1

If bash is going to be your preferred shell in Linux, rather than looking for a tool, you might be better served to spend a few minutes learning how to do this in bash. Unless the csh script is really complex, it's not likely to take much effort to translate, and having done that you'll be armed with the knowledge to understand future bash (and csh) scripts ...


1

Yes, post the code. There are hordes of alpha geeks just waiting here to do this sort of work for you, sort of like Rent A Coder but without the cost :-) Seriously, it's likely to be just the fact that, from memory, csh uses parentheses for conditions while bash uses [[...]] but, until you post the code (at least the offending lines with some context), we ...


1

exec /bin/zsh Oh z shell, what would I do without you?



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