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7

You can do .yourclass { border-right:1px solid black; padding: 10px; /*just to make it readable */ } .yourclass:first-child{ border-left:1px solid black; } <span class=yourclass>top</span> <span class=yourclass>left</span> <span class=yourclass>bottom</span> <span ...


5

Whatever the parent of the first ul is use that and then > (this means immediate children, learn more here). Like so. body > ul > li:first-child { background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236); list-style-type: none; margin-bottom: 3px; padding: 8px; } <ul> <li>to be selected</li> <li></li> ...


5

#rowtitle ul li { display: inline-block; }


3

Try: #homepage-full .node-homepage { background: none !important; }


3

you could use some skewed pseudo elements for this: .first, .last { text-align: center; line-height: 80px; height: 80px; background: green; position: relative; display: inline-block; width: 400px; margin-bottom: 20px; } .first:after { content: ""; position: absolute; bottom: 0; left: 0; height: 50%; width: ...


3

.circle { display: inline-block; margin-right: 10px; width: 100px; height: 100px; border-radius: 50%; background-color: orange; border: 2px black solid; position: relative; } .circle:before { content: ""; height: 5px; width: 20px; background: #000; position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: ...


2

Not setting both left and right on .tooltip, and setting white-space: nowrap should do it: .tooltip { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; margin: 0 auto; text-align: center; width: auto; padding: 5px 10px; white-space: nowrap; } Working example. You'd need to use this solution to center an absolute element. It does require an additional ...


2

You should be able to do so in LESS with the following calc(~"100vh - 50px"); If you're happy with just a css solution, here is an example calc(100vh - 50px); JSFiddle Link


2

Try setting display: table; a.tooltip:hover .translation { display: table; opacity: 1.0; visibility: visible; }


2

You could use flexbox position: http://jsfiddle.net/xj98t1s9/2/ CSS .container { border: solid 1px black; /* enable flexbox on container */ display: flex; /* wrap the elements contained */ flex-wrap: wrap; /* add a space between elements so they are aligned with the edges */ justify-content: space-between; } HTML <div ...


2

In this instance, you have to define the final state in your CSS first. Then define the new start point in your animation body { margin: 100px; } a { border: 1px solid #D74C43; /* end like this */ display: inline-block; padding: 20px; -webkit-animation: border-grow 0.5s; animation: border-grow 0.5s; -webkit-animation-delay: ...


2

use the line-height property to manage the spacing between lines. #sequence .title { text-align: left; margin-bottom: 7%; margin-left: -2%; font-family: roboto; font-size: 28px; min-width: 70%; overflow: scroll; padding:4%; position: relative; } The code which you've shown here doesn't specify the line-height ...


2

SVG Here is an svg solution. Used a clip path on a circle element (to exclude a corner of the image) Then made the pizza slice with a path element with an arc type. <svg width="100px" height="100px" viewbox="0 0 110 110"> <defs> <clipPath id="myClip"> <path clip-rule="evenodd" d="M0 0 100 0 100 100 0 ...


1

The reason is the same why you can't re-trigger CSS based animations by just subsequently removing and adding a class. The reason is that browser batch-up these modifications and optimize away the animation. Reason and solutions are discussed here.


1

Try like this: Demo ul li { width:100px; border:1px solid red; margin:10px; display:inline-block; /*newly added and removed float property*/ }


1

Use outline instead of border. http://jsfiddle.net/nw0q4z6z/


1

ul li { width:100px; vertical-align:top; /* This */ display:inline-block; /* and more importantly this */ border:1px solid red; margin:10px; } Use display:inline-block; instead of float:left; as often as possible. And also, add vertical-align:top; for it to look good. Demo


1

You have many options. The first option is to use an outline on the .selected element. The second option is to apply a box-sizing:border-box on the parent element. The third option is to use a box-shadow on the .selected element. Personally I would go with the third option. ul { list-style-type: none; } ul li { width: 100px; float: left; ...


1

Try this : fiddle ul {list-style-type:none; display: flex; display: -webkit-flex; display: -moz-flex; justify-content: space-around; -webkit-justify-content: space-around; -moz-justify-content: space-around; flex-flow: row wrap; -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap; -moz-flex-flow: row wrap;}


1

ul.selected { list-style-type: none; width:100px; float:left; border:1px solid red; margin:10px; } <ul class="selected"> <li> One </li> <li> Two </li> <li> Three </li> <li> Four </li> <li> Four </li> <li> Four </li> ...


1

I think you are over complicating the problem here. Try the following: body { margin: 50px; } .RoundedElement { width: 30px; height: 50px; position: relative; right: 20px; border-radius: 15px 0px 0px 15px; background-color: #F7A824; } <div class="RoundedElement"> </div> Why not use the regular ...


1

display:inline-block; Just add display:inline-block; to the styles for the div. That should work :) http://jsfiddle.net/432kxywu/


1

You are using id for showing <li> styles but used class in html and for 1st line css.. Try to change it like this: Demo CSS: #rowtitle ul { list-style-type: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; } #rowtitle ul li { display: block; float:left; /* instead you can use display: inline-block; */ ...


1

Here is an alternative Paulie_D's example using flexbox and a different :nth-child approach. It allows any number of elements but never more than three per row. If there are more than three elements the width of all will be restricted to 1/3 of the parent element which I think is what you were asking for in your question. It does however rely on an ...


1

You can set the styles, and then undo them. li:first-child { background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236); list-style-type: none; margin-bottom: 3px; padding: 8px; } li li:first-child { background-color: inherit; list-style-type: inherit; margin-bottom: inherit; padding: inherit; } Fiddle; https://jsfiddle.net/wLspzcho/


1

I don't know if this is what you wanted but try this .first > li:first-child { background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236); list-style-type: none; margin-bottom: 3px; padding: 8px; } <ul class="first"> <li>to be selected</li> <li></li> <li> <ul> ...


1

Using :after pseudo element and linear-gradient you can get desire results. Here in this code I am using background:liner-gradient on :after pseudo element with just using a one single element. You may have to use browser prefix as well if you targeting older browsers. Check Demo as well. div { height: 100px; border: 1px solid red; ...


1

To set a border gradient on a single border (or multiple borders), you simply need to declare style rules in your CSS for: border-image border-image-slice border-image-width .box { width: auto; height: 20px; background: #ccc; border-image: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(255, 64, 0, 1), rgba(255, 64, 0, 0)); border-image-slice: 1; ...


1

You should use the :hover pseudo class on their shared container (let's say the div with the fbgsm class) instead of on the text element itself: Working example So write this: .fbgsm:hover #fsmhover { margin-left: -400px; } Instead of this: #fsmhover:hover { margin-left: -400px; } #fsmscroll2:hover + #fsmhover { margin-left: -400px; }


1

You can do this with border cut-offs. As an example: .top { height: 300px; background: red; position: relative; width: 300px } .top:before { content: ''; position: absolute; bottom: 0; right: 0; border-bottom: 10px solid white; border-right: 300px solid red; width: 0; } .bottom { height: 300px; background: ...



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