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0

Even though the question has been asked for a while now, but I actually encountered the same issue and solved it by following the below steps: Open your excel sheet (.xls or .xlsx) Save it in Unicode Text (.txt) format Open the text file and change the encoding to UTF-8 Replace the delimiter (which could be Tab delimited) by a comma Make sure the file ...


0

Even though the question has been asked for a while now but I actually encountered the same issue and solved it by following the below steps: Open your excel sheet (.xls or .xlsx) Save it in Unicode Text (.txt) format Open the text file and change the encoding to UTF-8 Replace the delimiter (which could be Tab delimited) by a comma Make sure the file is ...


0

You could use Python's csv library as follows: import csv with open('input.csv', 'rb') as f_input, open('output.csv', 'wb') as f_output: csv_input = csv.reader(f_input) csv_output = csv.writer(f_output) csv_output.writerow(next(csv_input)) # write header for cols in csv_input: for i in xrange(1, 10): cols[i] = ...


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you have to configure the database connection to make sure the encoding you choose for your webapplication (moodle) is the same as the encoding your database connection will choose. look for SET NAMES 'utf8' or similar if you use mariadb/mysql as database. and compare off course to the encoding of your import file. maybe you will need to convert it first. ...


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I'm guessing the original file is using a different encoding. Try to convert the csv file to utf8 then import. How do I correct the character encoding of a file?


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If you want correct rounding, you will have to read each column and convert it to an integer. If you keep it as a string, best you can do is truncating the number to 3 digits after the decimal point. In order to round, you should use the round primitive (see here). If truncating is enough, you will still have to read the file line by line and write the ...


2

One way to do this is with a couple of defaultdict of sets. The first keeps track of all of the subgroups seen, the second keeps track of those subgroups that have been processed. Using a set simplifies the code somewhat, as does using a defaultdict when compared to using a standard dictionary (although it's still possible). import csv from collections ...


0

You can switch to using Python's DictWriter for this. You can pass a list of column headers, this ensures that the order of the columns in the output is what you require. Only columns in this list are written to the your output file: import csv zip_list = [ {'date': '2015/01/01 00:00', 'v': 96.5}, {'date': '2015/01/01 00:01', 'v': 97.0}, ...


0

writer.writerows expects a sequence of values for writing a single row into the CSV file. Using your original code: import csv res =[{'date': '2015/01/01 00:00', 'v': 96.5}, {'date': '2015/01/01 00:01', 'v': 97.0}, {'date': '2015/01/01 00:02', 'v': 93.75}, {'date': '2015/01/01 00:03', 'v': 96.0}, {'date': '2015/01/01 00:04', 'v': 94.5}] csvfile = ...


1

Since I find csv.DictWriter not transparent in what its doing, I would recommend doing the following: with open(csvfile, "w") as output: output.write(';'.join(list(r.keys()))+"\n") [output.write(';'.join(list(r.values()))+"\n") for r in res]


0

Here's a select that you should be able to run over your table to test. Replace the FROM ( .... ) as tbl bit with your real table You can see that the expressions in the select are pretty ugly and unwieldy so have a think about whether you are happy maintaining this There is a WHERE at the end to stop invalid data getting in. If data with missing ...


0

Perform a groupby on the company name and first 8 characters of your string timestamp (i.e. date plus hour). Then use agg on the price to get custom functions for each (first, max, min and last). Unstack the company names, swap the levels of the company names and open/high/low/close and optionally sort your symbols. gb = (df.groupby(['CompanyName', ...


0

For your first question, you can use df.groupby(df.Time.str[0:8]) For your second question, unstack should be what you want: df.groupby(df.Time.str[0:8]).unstack()


0

,"No",""Access" This is malformed csv, because the inner (double)quote should be escaped with another quote (or a \ on some systems): ,"No","""Access" You could try to fix this in single line rows, but: that person could put the extra quote in just about any cell/field. there are newline/linebreaks inside of cells also. "Unquoted fields do ...


0

This is very close, I think you just need to use csv.DictWriter instead of csv.writer because you are passing in a dictionary which is a mapping of field names to values. If you want your csv file to have a header, you'll also need to call a.writeheader() before calling a.writerows(flat).


0

You should try using the DictWriter from csv module. with open('test.csv', 'w') as fp: a = csv.DictWriter(fp, delimiter=',', fieldnames=flat.keys()) a.writeheader() a.writerow(flat) The headers will appear in an undefined order though here, since it depends on the return value of the keys method. You can change this by setting the list of ...


0

You can rescue from CSV::MalformedCSVError and create separate handlers for lines with such problems, but this means you'll have to parse every line separately and you lose column names from the header line. require 'csv' File.open('csv.csv').each_line do |input_row| begin CSV.parse(input_row) do |row| puts row.inspect end rescue ...


0

Here is a trick that may help. Use :quote_char => "'" (assuming values in columns in CSV do not have single quote character), and this will include double quotes in the read values - which you can get rid via code: Example: CSV.foreach(f, :force_quotes => true, :encoding => Encoding::UTF_8, :quote_char => "'") do |row| puts ...


0

A slightly more modern approach is to use the httr package: library(httr) res <- POST("https://research.stlouisfed.org/", path="fred2/series/MKTGDPSAA646NWDB/downloaddata", body=list(`form[native_frequency]` = "Annual", `form[units]` = "lin", `form[frequency]` = "Annual", ...


0

We can have multi worded field names. Instead of field by name : Previous Rank (which is multi worded) have it as prv_rank or any name as long as its a valid identifier. Likewise for other field names. Ref : https://pig.apache.org/docs/r0.11.0/basic.html#Data+Types+and+More Identifiers Identifiers include the names of relations (aliases), fields, ...


0

(Untested code; no working example available) Try: Use the list.files function to generate the correct names and then use colClasses as argument to read.csv to throw away the first 4 columns (and since that vector is recycled you will alss throw away the 6th column): lapply(list.files("E:\\test\\", patt="^exp[1-6]"), read.csv, ...


0

The "JSON response" shown in the question is not technically valid JSON, so since this answer depends on a JSON-aware tool (jq), the first task is to convert the "JSON response" to valid JSON. This can be done (for example) using json5 or any-json. Assuming the "JSON response" is in a file named response.txt, we can proceed as follows, where the initial $ ...


0

Take a look that the date_parser parameter to pandas.read_csv(). Something along the lines of this should work: import dateutil from pandas import read_csv def my_date_parser(seq): return [dateutil.parser.parse(s[:14]) for s in seq] csv = read_csv('file.csv', parse_dates=[3], date_parser=my_date_parser) You will probably need to also supply ...


0

There is a handy library for parsing timestamps: datetime: import datetime x = '20140203 00:00:03.132' timestamp = datetime.datetime.strptime(x, '%Y%m%d %H:%M:%S.%f') print datetime.datetime.strftime(timestamp, '%Y%m%d %H:%M') # 20140203 00:00 Or since it's a bit slow for a huge amount of data, you can split from the right on the first : and then take ...


0

Another way of doing it would be creating a hash with the IP address as key. The benefit is that it would only have to iterate once to create the lookup. ip_table = Hash[@response['response']['results'].map {|x| [x['ip'], x['ID']]}] CSV.foreach("list.csv", :headers => true) do |row| if ip_table[row[8]] puts "Match: " + row[8] + " = " + ...


0

Using lodash and the csv package: var csv = require('csv'); var _ = require('lodash'); var obj = { '2016-01-31': { chats: 0, missed_chats: 5 }, '2016-02-01': { chats: 60, missed_chats: 7 }, '2016-02-02': { chats: 56, missed_chats: 1 }, '2016-02-03': { chats: 46, missed_chats: 0 }, '2016-02-04': { chats: 63, missed_chats: 2 }, ...


0

This answer, will automatically get the headers (first line), and add it to the CSV. var input={ '2016-01-31': { chats: 0, missed_chats: 5 }, '2016-02-01': { chats: 60, missed_chats: 7 }, '2016-02-02': { chats: 56, missed_chats: 1 }, '2016-02-03': { chats: 46, missed_chats: 0 }, '2016-02-04': { chats: 63, missed_chats: 2 }, '2016-02-05': { chats: 59, ...


1

This outputs a semicolon separated csv-string. Edit the separator (for example replace it with tab \t) to suit your needs: var json = { '2016-01-31': { chats: 0, missed_chats: 5 }, '2016-02-01': { chats: 60, missed_chats: 7 }, '2016-02-02': { chats: 56, missed_chats: 1 }, '2016-02-03': { chats: 46, missed_chats: 0 }, '2016-02-04': { chats: 63, missed_chats: ...


0

You may not need two loops. You could do as below: (Not tested as JSON structure was not shared in question) results = @response["response"]["results"] CSV.foreach("list.csv", :headers => true) do |row| matching_entry = results.find { |data| row["IP Address"] == data["ip"]} if matching_entry puts "Match: " + row["IP Address"] + " = " + ...


0

Your problem is in Create. rows points to an array of rows. Each row has columns and each column has a value (one value). When you assign the address of the values to the column of the row, I see i is not involved. That indicates you assign the addresses of the first rows of values repeatedly to each row[i][k]. So not only your first row is overwritten, ...


0

I will answer my question becasue I found a prefect and powerful solution to this problem that is called OpenRefine, a former google project (Google Refine). As my data sets are over a millioon rows now, this is the fastest and best solution (much better than excel) to work with. http://openrefine.org/


0

I modified my source code. My only issue is the server gets only the last line of my array. There is something bad that I am doing but I don't know. here's my new source code: <?php $URL = 'https://mutalyzer.nl/services/?wsdl'; ?><!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <title>Mutalyzer SOAP ...


1

It seems the class CSVParser does not exist in opencsv 1.8. This class was introduced in opencsv 2.1. As such, you need to update your dependency to version 2.1 at least. <dependency> <groupId>net.sf.opencsv</groupId> <artifactId>opencsv</artifactId> <version>2.1</version> </dependency> Note ...


0

Assuming that your input files always have at least 11 rows (since you skip the first 11 rows!) this should work: filelist = list.files(pattern = ".txt") for (i in 1:length(filelist)) { cur.input.file <- filelist[i] cur.output.file <- paste0(cur.input.file, ".csv") print(paste("Processing the file:", cur.input.file)) # If the input file has ...


0

You have to use like below, you can refer put comma as separator in export to CSV in php for more. $delimiter = ','; $enclosure = '"'; $f = fopen('php://temp', 'wt'); $first = true; while ($row = $result->fetch_assoc()) { fputcsv($f, $row, $delimiter, $enclosure); }


0

having not seen the data it is just a guess beased on what you have used above but perhaps you just need to add the remaining fields from the csv? $importSQL = "INSERT INTO `tbl_applicants` ( application_no, applicant_name, applicant_email, applicant_mobile, applicant_address ) VALUES ('$data[0]','$data[1]','$data[2]','$data[3]','$data[4]')"


0

Please replace this insert query with above query. $importSQL = "INSERT INTO tbl_applicants (application_no, applicant_name,applicant_email, applicant_mobile, applicant_address) VALUES('$data[0]','$data[1]','','','')";


0

You need to index the output inside the loop as well. Try this: INFILES = list.files(pattern = ".txt") OUTFILES = vector(mode = "character", length = length(INFILES)) for (i in 1:length(INFILES)) { OUTFILES[i] = read.csv(file = INFILES[i], header = TRUE, skip = 11, fill = TRUE) write.csv(OUTFILES[i], file = paste0("folder_name", ...


2

Here is one more way to do this: csv1.zip(csv2).collect{|v1, v2| v1.merge(v2) rescue v1 } We first combine the two arrays using zip csv1 = [1,2,{3 => :a},4] csv2 = [5,6,{7 => :b},8] t = csv1.zip(csv2) #=> [[1, 5], [2, 6], [{3=>:a}, {7=>:b}], [4, 8]] Next, we collect the result of merging two elements of the sub-arrays. However, since ...


1

use the OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY clause. SELECT * FROM table INTO OUTFILE 'table.csv' FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'; The OPTIONALLY modifier makes it do this only for string columns. You also need to leave out the subquery that returns the header line. The problem is that all rows of a union need to have ...


0

From OP's question, it isn't clear if the term can appear in any column or in one specific column. So I'll assume it can appear in any column, since this is more generic. But if the question is about one specific column, then my solution may yield wanted results depending on the data structure. # dummy data frame set.seed(1) df = ...


0

If you aren't concerned about the possibility of ';' occurring within the first two fields, and if you don't want to be bothered with dependence on environment variables, then consider: awk -F';' -v add=125 ' function sum(s, d) { # global: q, add gsub(q, "", s); split(s,d,","); return (add+d[1])","d[2]; } BEGIN {OFS=FS; q="\""; } ...


2

This is one way. arr1 = [1,2,{ 3 => 'a' },4] arr2 = [5,6,{ 7 => 'b' },8] arr1.map do |e| case e when Hash then e.merge(arr2.select { |e| e.is_a? Hash }.first) else e end end #=> [1, 2, {3=>"a", 7=>"b"}, 4] When e #=> { 3 => 'a' } h2 = arr2.select { |e| e.is_a? Hash }.first #=> [{ 7 => 'b' }].first # { 7 ...


1

In [26]: import pandas as pd In [27]: import datetime In [28]: a = pd.read_csv('a.csv') In [29]: a Out[29]: columnA 0 1 1 2 In [30]: a['Date'] = [datetime.date.today()]*len(a) In [31]: a Out[31]: columnA Date 0 1 2016-02-05 1 2 2016-02-05 In [32]: a.to_csv('adate.csv') Generally: ...


3

If you add the filename as the final column, you don't need to parse the csv at all. Just read them line by line, add filename and write. And don't open in binary mode! import glob import os out_filename = "combined.files.csv" if os.path.exists(out_filename): os.remove(out_filename) read_files = glob.glob("*.csv") with open(out_filename, "w") as ...


1

You can us pandas. Example file many_cols.csv: col1,col2,col3 1,10,100 1,20,100 2,10,100 3,30,100 Find unique values per column: >>> import pandas as pd >>> df = pd.read_csv('many_cols.csv') >>> df.col1.drop_duplicates().tolist() [1, 2, 3] >>> df['col2'].drop_duplicates().tolist() [10, 20, 30] >>> ...


0

Overly "clever" approach to figuring out unique values for all the rows at once (assumes all columns are the same size, though it ignores empty lines seamlessly): # Assumes somefile was opened properly earlier csvin = filter(None, csv.reader(somefile)) for i, vals in enumerate(map(sorted, map(set, zip(*csvin)))): print("Unique values for column", i) ...


0

I would use a set() for this. Lets say the csv file is this and we want only unique values from second column. foo,1,bar baz,2,foo red,3,blue git,3,foo Here is the code that would accomplish this. I am simply printing out the unique values to test that it worked. import csv def parse_csv_file(rawCSVFile): fileLineList = [] with ...


0

Have you tried to enclose the variable like this: $csv->setDelimiter("{$this->csv_delimiter}"); ? I used this sample of code to check it: $obj = json_decode(json_encode(array("a" => "\t"))); var_dump("{$obj->a}"); // output: string(1) " "


0

Download and install Neo4j if you haven't already Move the graph.db directory that you have now into the data/ directory of the fresh Neo4j installation, replacing the existing graph.db directory in the fresh Neo4j instance. (Note: If you are using the desktop Neo4j application you can simply choose the location of your existing graph.db directory when ...



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