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0

Solved my problem. I had a 32 bit version of python installed on 64 bit windows 7. Above code worked after installing Python 2.7.8 x64.


1

You need to use GetWindowLongW in a 32-bit process, and GetWindowLongPtrW in a 64-bit process.


0

What you are really trying to do is automate a Windows file dialog. Python has various automation frameworks. You could do worse than use pywinauto for this task. Another option would be to bind to the platform automation library, UI Automation. That's relative easy using COM.


1

Just create a pointer, assign the data afterwards; import ctypes class EmxArray(ctypes.Structure): """ creates a struct to match emxArray_real_T """ _fields_ = [('data', ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_double)), ('size', ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_int)), ('allocatedSize', ctypes.c_int), ('numDimensions', ...


0

I'm not well-versed with the Python-C interface, so what I'm suggesting may be less than ideal. My guess is that likely the crash is because x->data is never initialized and the memory to which it is pointing isn't allocated. An approach I have taken when interfacing to MATLAB Coder generated code from other languages in the presence of emxArray ...


0

I think we can start by making a pointer rather than an int32: numberOfThings = ctypes.c_int32() indices = ctypes.c_void_p() _Dll.doSomeThing(ctypes.byref(numberOfThings), ctypes.byref(indices)) We can then convert the address into a properly typed pointer to an array (here assumed to be doubles): ptrt = ...


0

From python's official documentation: Pointer instances are created by calling the pointer() function on a ctypes type: >>> >>> from ctypes import * >>> i = c_int(42) >>> pi = pointer(i) >>> Pointer instances have a contents attribute which returns the object to which the pointer points, the i ...


0

I solved it, this has to be done: param1 = ctypes.c_int32() param2 = ctypes.c_int32() param3 = ctypes.c_int32() param4 = ctypes.c_int32() exemple_Dll.doSomeThing(ctypes.byref(param1), ctypes.byref(param2), ctypes.byref(param3), ctypes.byref(param4))


7

restype is not there just to tell the Python output type, but, most importantly, to tell what is the C type to expect, and thus how to marshal it. islower returns an int, which is typically 4 bytes wide; if you say it returns a bool (which is normally 1 byte) you are breaking the expectations of the marshaling code. This time you got an incorrect result ...


3

The error reported by your Python is very clear. function 'plop' not found This means that the DLL does not export a function of that name. So, you need to export the function. Either with a .def file, or using __declspec(dllexport): extern "C" { __declspec(dllexport) int plop(); } To inspect your DLL to debug issues like this, use dumpbin or ...


2

You need to give your function "C" linkage to avoid name mangling. Declare it like this: extern "C" { int plop(); } and it will then properly be called "plop" rather than being name-mangled.


0

CTYPES can be found in the official mercurial repository for the source code of the Python language, in the appropriate folder. It can be seem through the web at this URL: http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/3134189655b1/Modules/_ctypes


2

What i had wrong: Structs (thanks David) : BITMAP has no DWORDs; it has WORDs. RGBQUADs rgbReserved is a BYTE not a void pointer. BITMAPINFO doesn't need RGBQUAD array for bitmaps with 32 bits per pixel. Pointers (thanks Roger, i come from python :P ): GetDIBits parameter lpvBits needs a pointer to the buffer GetDIBits parameter lpbi needs a pointer to ...


1

I think the only practical way to do this is to write the code that calls the function in asm. Only by controlling it at that level can you be sure that no other party will modify a register. One way would be to do it statically and have a compiler/linker build a DLL that you can call from your Python code, passing whatever information is needed. ...


2

The resolution of a windows bitmap is defined by the biXPelsPerMeter and biYPelsPerMeter members of the `BITMAPINFOHEADER' structure. The Python Imaging Library (PIL) writes the resolution as 1 pixel per meter in both directions (line 225 of BmpImagePlugin.py). Thus Word thinks the bitmap is hundreds of metres in size and scales it badly. PIL does not ...


1

I'd recommend that you use a wrapper like py-wkhtmltox instead of trying to use the C API for libwkhtmltox via ctypes.


1

Yes, you should, because why it had worked is because of ctypes' guess. Replace int test_i(int i) with int test_i(char i), and you will get stack corruption — because Python side gives function 4 or 8 bytes, while C side only reads 1 byte. Depending on platform, this may go unnoticed for some time, or gradually eat up your stack, or crash immediately, or ...


2

exit calles the system's exit function and terminates the process running, in your case ipython. The way error handling is done in C is by setting some global error variable and returning a status flag #include <math.h> char *error_string; extern char* get_error_string() { return error_string; } extern int cfun(double* A) { // raise exception ...


4

Create a class MyCtStructure, then all its subclass do not need to implement __eq__ & __ne__. Defining eq would be not be a bit tedious job in your case anymore. import ctypes as ct class MyCtStructure(ct.Structure): def __eq__(self, other): for fld in self._fields_: if getattr(self, fld[0]) != getattr(other, fld[0]): ...


2

p1.x == p2.x and p1.y = p2.y will work in this trivial case. You could also implement the __eq__() an __ne__() methods in your Point class: class Point(ct.Structure): _fields_ = [ ('x', ct.c_int), ('y', ct.c_int), ] def __eq__(self, other): return (self.x == other.x) and (self.y == other.y) def __ne__(self, other): ...


-1

Sample code looks, This code invokes GetFileAttributesA function from kernel32.dll >>> from ctypes import * >>> windll.LoadLibrary("kernel32.dll") <WinDLL 'kernel32.dll', handle 77260000 at 2241ad0> >>> windll.kernel32 <WinDLL 'kernel32', handle 77260000 at 225c2f0> >>> ...


0

Thanks to eryksyn, I was able to fix this issue. The fix looks like: def wrap_callback(fn): def inner(*args, **kwargs): return fn(*args, **kwargs) return _command_callback(inner), inner def my_callback(*args): print args return 1 ctypes_cb, my_callback = wrap_callback(my_callback)


0

Your struct definitions assign to _fields instead of the correct attribute name _fields_. To help catch a typo like this, define __slots__ = '__weakref__'. This prevents instances from getting a __dict__, but it retains the ability to create weak references. Of course, it's still a problem if you have a typo in the __slots__ definition itself, so a larger ...


1

As far as I understand, you're have trouble with structure packing. It looks like your code is reading "03 00 00 00 49 7B 00 00" (word size - 64bits) but only using the first 4 bytes "03 00 00 00". Update: According to eryksun, the analysis above is correct. Just set _pack_ = 1 in the definition of DataStructure. Some experimenting with C code: #include ...



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