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10

The docs for thrust::sort show it accepts a comparison operator. See in their example how those are defined and used. I haven't tested this, but based on the example, all you would need is a struct that looks something like this: struct OBCmp { __host__ __device__ bool operator()(const OB& o1, const OB& o2) { return o1.N < o2.N; } }; ...


5

Even though you may sort the objects by using special struct definitions, using a struct as functor, it will make thrust to change the sort algorithm from radix-sort to merge-sort. Speed of radix-sort is noticeably faster than merge-sort. So when using thrust, try to use integer types as key values as possible. I may suggest you using ...


4

First, dynamic memory allocation is possible in CUDA on Compute Capability 2.0 and higher devices. The CUDA runtime library supports malloc/free and new/delete in __device__ functions. But that is not germane to the answer, really. Typically a large-enough output array is provided (pre-allocated, often the same size as the input array) and the output is ...


3

It's not part of the CUDA toolkit or CUDA SDK. You will have to get it from its source. The JCuda pages you linked indicate: JCudpp is only a Java binding for CUDPP. That means, in order to use JCudpp, you need the CUDPP library. This library can be compiled from the source code that is available at the CUDPP home page


3

For as far as I'm aware, there are no restrictions with regards to compute capability. There are some optimizations for cards with a Fermi architecture (sm_20) according to the change logs. CUDPP 2.0 does however state it only works for CUDA 3.0 or higher (and they advice to use versions higher than 3.2), but this has no direct relation to compute ...


2

These libraries, especially thrust, try to be as generic as possible and optimization often requires specialization: For example a specialization of an algorithm can use shared memory for fundamental types (like int or float) but the generic version can't. It happens that for a particular situation a specialization is missing! It's a good idea to use these ...


2

you can sort objects by overloading operator< . For example: __host__ __device__ struct Color{ double blue, green, red; double distance; void dist() { distance = sqrt(blue*blue + green*green + red*red); } }; __host__ __device__ bool operator<(const Color &lhs, const Color &rhs) { return lhs.distance < rhs.distance; } int ...


1

The problem is right there in the error text you posted: too few arguments in function call Your code is only provided 5 arguments. As can be seen here, the cudppPlan function required 6 arguments. It looks like you are missing the first argument to the call.


1

To write your own prefix scan, you may refer to The scan example of the CUDA SDK; Chapter 13 of N. Wilt, "The CUDA Handbook"; Chapter 6 of S. Cook, "CUDA Programming, A Developer's Guide to Parallel Computing with GPUs"; Parallel Prefix Sum (Scan) with CUDA. To do multi prefix-sum you can launch many times the same kernel (as suggested by a.lasram) or ...


1

You have three possibilities: write your own version of scan function, try to copy code from cudpp and try to integrate with your project, compile cudpp with Cmake and use this library, your can use also thrust library (homepage).


1

I have used both for sorting and prefix sums about a year ago (with CUDA 4.1, but I can't remember the versions of Thrust and CUDPP) and I experienced that CUDPP is a little bit faster but Thrust is easier to use (using float-array with about 20M entries). As for the features, as far as I can recall, you can use Thrust also with host memory not only with ...


1

There's no reason why you can't combine CUDPP and MPI in the same application. They are orthogonal. You could also consider using Thrust's scan implementation, if you're using Fortran then see this blog post for some guidance.


1

Thrust does not currently provide the selection algorithm (i.e. std::nth_element in the STL) though it's on our radar and there's good evidence that selection can be done quickly on the GPU. Your only recourse right now is to sort the data with thrust::sort or thrust::sort_by_key (or their stable_ variants) and then pick the appropriate element(s). Sorting ...


1

Your best bet is to do the timings yourself for your specific architecture / configuration. Once you provide the results and the code of the two implementations then SO can help spot some performance improvements.


1

Please submit your issue at http://code.google.com/p/cudpp/issues/list ASAP. We are getting CUDPP 2.0 ready for release and we'd like to fix the issue if there is one. Does the problem reproduce if you run "cudpp_testrig -scan -n=670000"? Also, if you can check out the latest version from the SVN trunk and try with that to see if it still fails that ...



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