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46

Consider this representation for lambda terms parametrized by their free variables. (See papers by Bellegarde and Hook 1994, Bird and Paterson 1999, Altenkirch and Reus 1999.) data Tm a = Var a | Tm a :$ Tm a | Lam (Tm (Maybe a)) You can certainly make this a Functor, capturing the notion of renaming, and a Monad capturing the ...


27

Life is a little bit hard, since Haskell is non strict. The general use case is to handle impossible paths. For example simple :: Either Void a -> a simple (Left x) = absurd x simple (Right y) = y This turns out to be somewhat useful. Consider a simple type for Pipes data Pipe a b r = Pure r | Await (a -> Pipe a b r) | Yield !b (Pipe a b ...


26

The Curry-Howard isomorphism simply states that types in correspond to propositions, and values correspond to proofs. Int -> Int doesn't really mean much interesting as a logical proposition. When interpreting something as a logical proposition, you're only interested in whether the type is inhabited (has any values) or not. So, Int -> Int just means ...


21

I'm thinking that perhaps it's useful in some cases as a type-safe way of exhaustively handling "can't happen" cases This is precisely right. You could say that absurd is no more useful than const (error "Impossible"). However, it is type restricted, so that its only input can be something of type Void, a data type which is intentionally left ...


21

Since you explicitly asked for the most interesting and obscure ones: You can extend C-H to many interesting logics and formulations of logics to obtain a really wide variety of correspondences. Here I've tried to focus on some of the more interesting ones rather than on the obscure, plus a couple of fundamental ones that haven't come up yet. evaluation ...


19

You're muddying things a little bit regarding nontermination. Falsity is represented by uninhabited types, which by definition can't be non-terminating because there's nothing of that type to evaluate in the first place. Non-termination represents contradiction--an inconsistent logic. An inconsistent logic will of course allow you to prove anything, ...


18

Here's a shorter version of Philip JF's solution, which is the way dependent type theorists have been refuting equations for years. type family Discriminate x type instance Discriminate Int = () type instance Discriminate Char = Void transport :: Equal a b -> Discriminate a -> Discriminate b transport Refl d = d refute :: Equal Int Char -> Void ...


15

Monads are one particular way of structuring and sequencing computations. The bind of a monad cannot magically restructure your computation so as to happen in a more efficient way. There are two problems with the way you structure your computation. When evaluating stepN 20 0, the result of step 0 will be computed 20 times. This is because each step of the ...


12

Your chart is not quite right; in many cases you have confused types with terms. function type implication function proof of implication function argument proof of hypothesis function result proof of conclusion function application RULE modus ponens recursion n/a [1] structural induction ...


11

The primary source (I think) for loeb is Dan Piponi's blog, A Neighborhood of Infinity. There he explains the whole concept in greater detail. I'll replicate a little bit of that as an answer and add some examples. loeb implements a strange kind of lazy recursion loeb :: Functor a => a (a x -> x) -> a x loeb x = fmap (\a -> a (loeb x)) x ...


11

I really like this question. I don't know a whole lot, but I do have a few things (assisted by the Wikipedia article, which has some neat tables and such itself): I think that sum types/union types (e.g. data Either a b = Left a | Right b) are equivalent to inclusive disjunction. And, though I'm not very well acquainted with Curry-Howard, I think this ...


9

Generally, you can use it to avoid apparently-partial pattern matches. For example, grabbing an approximation of the data type declarations from this answer: data RuleSet a = Known !a | Unknown String data GoRuleChoices = Japanese | Chinese type LinesOfActionChoices = Void type GoRuleSet = RuleSet GoRuleChoices type ...


8

You may do that def emptyFunction[A]: Nothing => A = {n => n} or def emptyFunction[A](n: Nothing): A = n


8

The problem is that your pattern's wildcard pattern loses equality information. If you encode induction in this way, you can't write a (finite) collection of patterns that covers all the cases. The solution is to move induction out from your data type into a defined value. The relevant changes look like this: data Equal a b where Reflexivity :: Equal a ...


8

The Curry-Howard correspondence is not about logic programming, but functional programming. The fundamental mechanic of Prolog is justified in proof theory by John Robinson's resolution technique, which shows how it is possible to check whether logical formulae expressed as Horn clauses are satisfiable, that is, whether you can find terms to substitue for ...


8

Here's a slightly obscure one that I'm surprised wasn't brought up earlier: "classical" functional reactive programming corresponds to temporal logic. Of course, unless you're a philosopher, mathematician or obsessive functional programmer, this probably brings up several more questions. So, first off: what is functional reactive programming? It's a ...


7

I don't understand the problem with using undefined every type is inhabited by bottom in Haskell. Our language is not strongly normalizing... You are looking for the wrong thing. Equal Int Char leads to type errors not nice well kept exceptions. See {-# LANGUAGE GADTs, TypeFamilies #-} data Equal a b where Refl :: Equal a a type family Pick cond ...


6

Related to the relationship between continuations and double negation, the type of call/cc is Peirce's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call-with-current-continuation C-H is usually stated as correspondence between intuitionistic logic and programs. However if we add the call-with-current-continuation (callCC) operator (whose type corresponds to Peirce's ...


5

Recently on Haskell Cafe Oleg gave an example how to implement the Set monad efficiently. Quoting: ... And yet, the efficient genuine Set monad is possible. ... Enclosed is the efficient genuine Set monad. I wrote it in direct style (it seems to be faster, anyway). The key is to use the optimized choose function when we can. {-# LANGUAGE ...


4

The problem is that with call/cc the result depends on the order of evaluation. Consider the following example in Haskell. Assuming we have the call/cc operator callcc :: ((a -> b) -> a) -> a callcc = undefined let's define example :: Int example = callcc (\s -> callcc (\t -> s 3 + t 4 ) ) Both ...


3

There are different ways how to represent the empty data type. One is an empty algebraic data type. Another way is to make it an alias for ∀α.α or type Void' = forall a . a in Haskell - this is how we can encode it in System F (see Chapter 11 of Proofs and Types). These two descriptions are of course isomorphic and the isomorphism is witnessed by \x -> ...


3

While it's not a simple isomorphism, this discussion of constructive LEM is a very interesting result. In particular, in the conclusion section, Oleg Kiselyov discusses how the use of monads to get double-negation elimination in a constructive logic is analogous to distinguishing computationally decidable propositions (for which LEM is valid in a ...


2

Logic programming is fundamentally about goal directed searching for proofs. The structural relationship between typed languages and logic generally involves functional languages, although sometimes imperative and other languages - but not logic programming languages directly. This relationship relates proofs to programs. So, logic programming proof ...


2

The only sensible answer I can come up with is this: If you have a function X -> Y -> Z, then the type signature says "assuming that it's possible to construct a value of type X, and another of type Y, then it is possible to construct a value of type Z". And the function body describes exactly how you would do this. That seems to make sense, but it's not ...


2

First-class continuations support allows you to express $P \lor \neg P$. The trick is based on the fact that not calling the continuation and exiting with some expression is equivalent to calling the continuation with that same expression. For more detailed view please see: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rwh/courses/logic/www-old/handouts/callcc.pdf


2

As I understand you need to guaranty inequalities of A & B (correct me if I am wrong) good solution (from Miles Sabin) in Shapeless library: // Type inequalities trait =:!=[A, B] def unexpected : Nothing = sys.error("Unexpected invocation") implicit def neq[A, B] : A =:!= B = new =:!=[A, B] {} implicit def neqAmbig1[A] : A =:!= A = unexpected ...


1

Well I guess you do not know how to read the types correctly. c01's type is (A -> B -> C) -> (B -> A -> C). That means it is a function, which takes a function as argument and returns a function. It takes "a function with two arguments" (I mean in the Haskell sense of "a function with two arguments", not in the Scala or Java sense), of type ...


1

2-continuation | Sheffer stoke n-continuation language | Existential graph Recursion | Mathematical Induction One thing that is important, but have not yet being investigated is the relationship of 2-continuation (continuations that takes 2 parameters) and Sheffer stroke. In classic logic, Sheffer stroke is a single logic operator ...


1

I don't think your performance problems in this case are due to the use of Cont step' :: Int -> Set Int step' i = fromList [i,i + 1] foldrM' f z0 xs = Prelude.foldl f' setReturn xs z0 where f' k x z = f x z `setBind` k stepN' :: Int -> Int -> Set Int stepN' times start = foldrM' ($) start (replicate times step') gets similar performance to ...



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