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0

It is not clear what you need to do: fit or smooth, you mentioned both. But if you need to smooth using OpenCV you can try Kalman filter (fit in its way and smooth), smooth-2D (using your 1D-data) or your own convolution smooth kernel 1D+1D using 1D-data for kernelX only convolution (the fastest way to smooth). OpenCV is near to real time image and video ...


0

There are multiple errors/typos in your code. 1) You cannot use - in your variable names in Python (chi-square should be chi_square for example) 2) You should from numpy import array or replace array with np.array. Currently the name array is not defined. 3) xc is not defined, you should set it before calling fitfunc(). 4) y3 = (0)[x==xc] is not valid, ...


0

You can apply Genetic Programming (GP) or one of its variants. I have a simple to use software named Multi Expression Programming X http://www.mep.cs.ubbcluj.ro/mepx_software.html that discovers such functions. I have loaded your data in the program and I have a have obtained the following C function: #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> void ...


0

Using ggplot2: ggplot(three, aes(Habitat.Complexity, Fish.species.richness))+ geom_point(shape = 1) + stat_smooth(method = "lm", formula = y ~ log(x))


0

For clarity and flexibility to other model types, you may want to use the predict function to calculate the predicted values along the range of your predictor variable: mod.log<-lm(Fish.species.richness~log(Habitat.Complexity), data=three) # predict along predictor variable range newdat <- ...


0

abline can only draw straight lines, on the form y = a + bx. Other curves can be added using the curve function. plot(Fish.species.richness ~ Habitat.Complexity, three) curve(coef(mod.log)[1] + coef(mod.log)[2]*log(x), add=TRUE)


2

The problem is very simple - since the first value in your x array is 0, you are taking the log of 0, which is equal to -inf: x = np.linspace(0, 4, 100) p0 = np.array([2, 0.5, 1]) print(func(x, *p0).min()) # -inf


2

I was able to fit a logarithmic function just fine using the following code (hardly modified from your original): import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from scipy.optimize import curve_fit def func(x, a, b, c): return a * np.log(x+b) + c def do_fitting(): x = np.linspace(0, 4, 100) y = func(x, 1.1, .4, 5) y2 = y + 0.2 * ...


2

Try using a degree 1 function over the interval 75 on. Really using a polynomial fit not what you want for this type of function. This looks most like 2 line segments joined together, so a linear fit over some of the points will give you a pretty good fit.


5

I cant comment because I lack reputation. If an admin moves this to comments I would be glad. I believe the problem is that your data does not look polynomial at all. You get a plateu in the end which cant be achieved by polynomials. Maybe try another function. Without any knowledge about the origin of the data it is hard to tell what kind of function is ...


5

The wave is pretty simple, so we'll fit a polynomial curve to the primary edge defined by the output of cv2. First we want to get the points of that primary edge. Let's assume your origin is as it is on the image, at the top left. Looking at the original image, I think we'll have a good approximation for our points of interest if we just take the points with ...


0

Try this a = wavread('filename') x = linspace(0, 1, numel(a))'; p = polyfit(x,a,4); display(p) Note that I transpose linspace output as it returns a row vector where wavread returns a column vector, which is why you get the error message.


0

I researched this a little, Applied Linear Regression by Sanford, and the Correlation and Regression lecture by Steiger had some good info on it. They all however lack the right model, the piecewise function should be \theta_0 + \theta_1 Temp & Temp \le \gamma and \theta_0 + \theta_1 Temp + \theta_2(Temp-\gamma) & Temp > \gamma Code import ...


2

The best fitting strategy is usually to reduce your non-linear or non-polynomial problem to a linear or polynomial one. In particular, the linear problem always has one and only one solution. So we would ideally fit f(x) = A*x + B where B = b * besy1(b) - this is for Bessel functions of the second kind, see edit below for modified Bessel functions of the ...


0

You could use a saturation model. Here's is some example code with comments: df <- read.table(header = TRUE, text = 'Mins Cumulative.1 Cumulative.2 Cumulative.3 0 0 0 0 5 NA 58 60 10 43 84 84 15 NA 121 96 20 63 128 101 25 NA 136 102 30 70 145 103') plot(Cumulative.3 ~ Mins, data = df) # fit saturation model mod <- ...


1

It has been a while since you asked the question but maybe you are still interested in some comments: At least your fit2 works fine when one varies the starting parameters (see code and plots below). I guess that fit3 is then just a "too complicated" model given these data which follow basically just a linear trend. That implies that two parameters are ...


1

I did something to similar to this a while ago. The approach I took was to use the solver (as gary's student suggests). I think it was fired from VBA but that's unimportant. Basically you'd have two input cells per row of data with your variables K and C. Then you need to find the difference (errors) between the values the function produces with the values ...


3

In general scipy.optimize.curve_fit works once we know the equation that best fits our dataset. Since you want to fit a dataset that follows a Gaussian, Lorentz etc, distributions, you can do so by providing their specific equations. Just as a small example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from scipy.optimize import curve_fit import ...


1

If "near-linear" and quadratic results are both legitimate possibilities, I suspect you are looking for some sort of empirical fit. Perhaps a power law would be a better model: a*x**b + c. This includes the possibilities of a parabola (b is 2), and a line (b is 1)


1

Building on @Cleb's answer, here's a way to pick a specified point the function must pass through and solve the resulting equation for one of the parameters: dd <- data.frame(x=c(-60,-50,-40,-30,-20,-10,-0,10), y=c(0.04, 0.09, 0.38, 0.63, 0.79, 1, 0.83, 0.56)) Initial fit (using plogis() rather than 1/(1+exp(-...)) for convenience): ...


3

It is not possible to force the fit to go through 0 using the function you provide (without an off-set) as we discussed in the comments but you can force the curve to go through other data points by setting weights for individual data points. So e.g. if you give a data point A a weight 1 and a data point B a weight 1000, the data point B is much more ...


2

You are asking two different questions: how to make the fitting of your data; and how to visualize the function obtained from the fitting process. For the first part you can do a fit using some of the built-in functions like curve-fit or minimize from scipy. For example import numpy as np from scipy.optimize import minimize x = np.array([1.6, 1.9, ...


2

You have to adjust your starting values a bit: > data Gossypol Treatment Damage_cm 1 1036.3318 1c_2d 0.4955 2 4171.4277 3c_2d 1.5160 3 6039.9951 9c_2d 4.4090 4 5909.0682 1c_7d 3.2665 5 4140.2426 1c_2d 0.4910 ... 54 2547.3262 1c_2d 0.5895 55 2608.7161 3c_2d 2.5590 56 1079.8465 C 0.0000 ...


0

I solved the problem. Xi is an array and integrate.quad() takes float only, so I splitted Xi array by enumerating it and I created an array the size of Xi and calculated integral for every element of Xi separately and passed it into an array: def func(Xi, vx, vz): z=0.0 f=0. t=Xi for i, item in enumerate(Xi): ...



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