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I'm not sure if this would always work, but here is an example of a "Generalized Additive Model" that uses a cyclic spline. When you specify that the model should not have an intercept (i.e. include -1 in formula, then it should pass through y=0. You will have to scale your predictor variable to be between 0 and 1 in order for the ends to pass through the ...


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This can be done by using maximum log likelihood estimation. This is a method that finds the set of parameters that is most likely to have yielded the measured data - the technique originates in statistics. I have finally found an understandable source for how to apply this to binned data. Sadly I cannot enter formulas here, so I refer to that source for a ...


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This page describes the algorithm easier than Wikipedia, without extra steps to calculate the means etc. : http://faculty.cs.niu.edu/~hutchins/csci230/best-fit.htm . Almost quoted from there, in C++ it's: #include <vector> #include <cmath> struct Point { double _x, _y; }; struct Line { double _slope, _yInt; double getYforX(double x) { ...


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You could use fitlm(X,y) function where X is all your 16 terms from u^0*a^0 to u^3*a^3 and y is your MOE of the equation. Then the output will be the coefficients, i.e., L00 to L33, you want.


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Building on what @eigenchris said, simply take the natural logarithm (log in MATLAB) of both sides of the equation. If we do this, we would in fact be linearizing the equation in log space. In other words, given your original equation: We get: However, this isn't exactly polynomial regression. This is more of a least squares fitting of your points. ...


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One approach is to use a linear regression of log(y) with respect to u² and a³: Assuming that u, a, and y are column vectors of the same length: AB = [u .^ 2, a .^ 3] \ log(y) After this, AB(1) is the fit value for A and AB(2) is the fit value for B. The computation uses Matlab's mldivide operator; an alternative would be to use the pseudo-inverse. The ...


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Fitting a Line can be acomplished in different ways. Least Square means minimizing the sum of the squared distance. But you could take another cost function as example the (not squared) distance. But normaly you use the squred distance (Least Square). There is also a possibility to define the distance in different ways. Normaly you just use the "y"-axis for ...


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You didn't take the order of the parameters to curve_fit into account: Definition: curve_fit(f, xdata, ydata, p0=None, sigma=None, **kw) Docstring: Use non-linear least squares to fit a function, f, to data. Assumes ydata = f(xdata, *params) + eps Parameters f : callable The model function, f(x, ...). It must take the ...


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Motion events with ACTION_MOVE may batch together multiple movement samples within a single object. The most current pointer coordinates are available using getX(int) and getY(int). Earlier coordinates within the batch are accessed using getHistoricalX(int, int) and getHistoricalY(int, int). Using them for building path makes it much smoother : int ...


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As am304, with such a data set I would strongly suggest to fit you data initially in the Y-X referential, then only calculate the equivalent in the X-Y referential if you really need the polynomial coefficients this way. One very useful function (I use it extensively) in the curvefit toolbox is the function smooth. In older version of Matlab, it used to be ...


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To expand slightly on what I said in the comments, my suggestion would be remove the outliers and fit x to y rather y to x. I only have Octave, not MATLAB, but the following is equivalent and should work just as well in MATLAB as in Octave: p = polyfit(y(x>=0.0056 & x<=0.00575),x(x>=0.0056 & x<=0.00575),1) yi = ...


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If you have the curve fitting toolbox then fit does allow for setting constraints using the 'upper' and 'lower' options. You would want something like. M=fit(x, f, 'poly4', 'upper', [-inf, 0, -inf, 0, -inf], 'lower', [0, 0, 0, 0, -inf]); Note use -inf to set a particular coefficient to be unconstrained. This will give a cfit object with the relevant ...


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I supouse you can use this line to measure the fit error: GoodnessOfFit.RSquared(xdata.Select(x => a+b*x), ydata); // == 1.0 where 1 means PERFECT (exactly on the line) and 0 means POOR. it is described in Math.NET documentation on that page: http://numerics.mathdotnet.com/docs/Regression.html#Simple-Regression-Fit-to-a-Line


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A very simple and effective way of interpolating the spectrum (from an FFT) is to use zero-padding. It works both with and without windowing prior to the FFT. Take your input vector of length N and extend it to length M*N, where M is an integer Set all values beyond the original N values to zeros Perform an FFT of length (N*M) Calculate the magnitude of ...


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For an unwindowed FFT, the correct interpolation between bins is by using a Sinc (sin(x)/x) or periodic Sinc (Dirichlet) interpolation kernel. For an FFT of samples of a band-limited signal, thus will reconstruct the continuous spectrum.


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It looks like the points are unordered, and so simply subtracting the last point by the first point won't work. What you can do is use max and min on the X array to determine the width: Width = max(X) - min(X); It's certainly as simple as that! FWIW, your title says one thing, but your question asks another. Suggest you either edit your question or ...


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Here is an almost-identical snippet which makes only use of curve_fit. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np import scipy.optimize as opt import scipy.integrate as integr x = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100) y = np.sin(x) + (0. + np.random.rand(len(x))*0.4) def Func(x, a0, a1, a2, a3): return a0 + a1*x + a2*x**2 + a3*x**3 # modified function ...


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What you are looking for are Weighted Least Squares. You can compute them with the function lscov. There is a nice example in its help page, but I'll try to make it clearer. Let us construct a simple parabola, with a corrupted point x = (0:0.1:1)'; y = 0.5*x.^2; y(5) = 3*y(5); and give some weights w = ones(size(y)); w(5) = 0.1; Next build the ...


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Searching for something, google brought my own question I asked some time ago. Now I know the answer and I give it here. I hope it helps someone. :) I will consider the lmfit.minimize function. So the changes I made was to plot the result of lmfit.minimize. And to solve the problem of logarithmic y-scale (which was the main problem also mentioned by ...


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Maybe you can use a probabilistic approach among the different measures. As an example, check the following 8min video where C. Sagan uses Drake equation to estimate the probability of other advanced civilizations in the universe, based on several (and different) measurements/estimates. You could similarly generate your estimate and then a score based on ...


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As VHarisop suggests, you can set a threshold for outliers and exclude them. But, depending on your plot, it might be important to ensure that the remaining data are not shunted horizontally to fill the gaps. To plot 1./y as a function of x, you could either just plot(x, 1./y) and then set the y limits with ylim to exclude the outliers from view, or use ...


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To remove points from an array, use the syntax total_BOLD_time_course( abs(total_BOLD_time_course<0.01) ) = nan that makes them 'blank' on the graph, and ignored by further calculations, but without destroying the temporal sequence of the datapoints. If actually destroying timepoints is not a concern then do total_BOLD_time_course( ...


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Yeah, you can. You might want to define a threshold, like e = 0.01, and cut off all vector elements whose absolute value is below e. Example: # assuming v is your initial vector e = 0.01 new_vector = v(abs(v) > e); Alternatively, you could use the excludedata tool from the Curve Fitting Toolbox, since you know the indices of the vector elements you ...


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Adjusting Tom's suggestion for making a workaround, I am now using the following code: DF2 <- lapply(unique(DF1$treatment),function(i) {datasubs=DF1[DF1$treatment==i,]; coef(nls(yield ~ a + b*0.99^N_level +c*N_level, data=datasubs, ...


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As already mentioned by Rob Falck, you could use, for example, the scipy nonlinear optimization routines in scipy.minimize to minimize an arbitrary error function, e.g. the mean squared error. Note that the function you gave does not necessarily have real values - maybe this was the reason your minimization in pyminuit did not converge. You have to treat ...


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If you are able to teach the system with score values for a number of numeric attributes combinations, then your problem is indeed multivariate interpolation. Most probably, your case is that of irregular data points. If your distribution of sample points is sufficiently homogeneous, radial basis function interpolation is a good starting point. ...


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If your label information is ordinal (i.e. ranking data), then you should use Learning to rank approaches. One of them is SVM Rank. It works like this: you put your dataset into a file in svmlight format and train a classifier via svm_rank_learn. You might want to tune parameters, it could give you better accuracy. Then feeding svm_rank_classify another ...


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Thank you @vk1011 for your suggestion. I was able to figure out a method using pandas and the apply function: import pandas as pd import numpy as np import scipy.ndimage import sys from pandas import DataFrame, read_csv df = pd.read_csv('dilato_data_all.csv') def gaussian(x): smoothed = scipy.ndimage.gaussian_filter(x, 5) return(smoothed) ...


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You could: Load the file using Pandas as a DataFrame and perform the gaussian filter operation on each column using apply, and write back to a csv or text file, OR (if you don't want to use Pandas) After loading the text file, split all the text in to different lists and perform the gaussian filter operation on each list separately with a for loop. This ...


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tl;dr: Check out HiScore. It will allow you to quickly write and maintain scoring functions that behave in sensible ways. To instantiate your simple example, let's say you have an app that receives as input a set of distances and times, and you want to map them to a 1-100 score. For instance, you get (1.2 miles, 8:37) and you'd like to return, say, 64. The ...


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You need to teach it what correct values are. There is no other way to precisely determine what a correct solution is. So as you said in the comments above, you need a human to tell it what the correct value (or what is the correct direction) is. This is exactly what Supervised Machine Learning is. You need to have a collection of classified values and then ...


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Typically, you'd use a library for this, rather than implementing it yourself. I'm going to use scipy.ndimage for this instead of scipy.signal. If you've had a signal processing class, you'd probably find the scipy.signal approach more intuitive, but if you haven't it will likely seem confusing. scipy.ndimage provides a straight-forward, one-function-call ...


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What you probably should do first is change TolX and TolFun to some more reasonable values. Setting them to 1e-100 this doesn't improve the result but just causes more iterations than necessary. I've attached a plot of a result of a fit using 1e-10 for both tolerances. The parameters I get are sigma=0.9881 and A=1.0000 and the fit looks quite acceptable. ...



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