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39

I like to do it this way: ip = '192.168.0.1' port = 1521 SID = 'YOURSIDHERE' dsn_tns = cx_Oracle.makedsn(ip, port, SID) db = cx_Oracle.connect('username', 'password', dsn_tns) One of the main reasons I like this method is that I usually have a TNSNAMES.ORA file lying around someplace, and I can check that the dsn_tns object will do the right thing by ...


24

However, if it can't connect, then db won't exist further down - which is why I set db = None above. However, is that good practice? No, setting db = None is not best practice. There are two possibilities, either connecting to the database will work or it won't. Connecting to the database doesn't work: As the raised exception has been caught and not ...


22

Here's what worked for me. My Python and Oracle versions are slightly different from yours, but the same approach should apply. Just make sure the cx_Oracle binary installer version matches your Oracle client and Python versions. My versions: Python 2.7 Oracle Instant Client 11G R2 cx_Oracle 5.0.4 (Unicode, Python 2.7, Oracle 11G) Windows XP SP3 Steps:...


20

There are three ways to iterate over a result set. The best way in terms of both readability and performance is usually to use the built-in cursor iterator. curs.execute('select * from people') for row in curs: print row You can fetch all the rows into a list, but this can have some bad side effects if the result set is large. You have ...


20

Add /apps/oracle/client/11.2.0.1/home1/lib/ to your LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable execute the command below in the terminal before running python or add it into your .bashrc export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/apps/oracle/client/11.2.0.1/home1/lib/


17

There are other improvements to make, but this really jumped out at me: for col in columns: # Create a new dictionary with field names as the key, # row data as the value. # # Then add this dictionary to the new_list row_dict[col] = row[columns.index(col)] In addition to being inefficient, using index in ...


16

Why don't you use a binary package like Windows Installer (Oracle 10g, Python 2.6)? See http://cx-oracle.sourceforge.net/ for other binary packages Addendum (as requested): you must ensure to use the cx_Oracle that : set ORACLE_HOME if this environment variable doesn't exist (see this Oracle FAQ) python can find oraocci11.dll for Oracle 11g, oraocci10....


14

My preferred way is the cursor iterator, but setting first the arraysize property of the cursor. curs.execute('select * from people') curs.arraysize = 256 for row in curs: print row In this example, cx_Oracle will fetch rows from Oracle 256 rows at a time, reducing the number of network round trips that need to be performed


13

Does the user that you are using to connect to the database (user A in this example) have SELECT access on the objects in the PCT schema? Assuming that A does not have this access, you would get the "table or view does not exist" error. Most likely, you need your DBA to grant user A access to whatever tables in the PCT schema that you need. Something ...


13

I a similar scenario, I was able to connect to the database by using cx_Oracle.makedsn() to create a dsn string with a given SID (instead of the service name): dsnStr = cx_Oracle.makedsn("oracle.sub.example.com", "1521", "ora1") This returns something like (DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=oracle.sub.example.com)(PORT=1521)))(...


12

I think the description attribute may be what you are looking for. This returns a list of tuples that describe the columns of the data returned. It works quite happily if there are no rows returned, for example: >>> import cx_Oracle >>> c = cx_Oracle.connect("username", "password") >>> cr = c.cursor() >>> cr.execute("select * from dual where 1=0") <...


12

You can specify the server in the connection string, e.g.: import cx_Oracle connstr = 'scott/tiger@server:1521/orcl' conn = cx_Oracle.connect(connstr) "server" is the server, or the IP address if you want. "1521" is the port that the database is listening on. "orcl" is the name of the instance (or database service).


11

Bindvars are used to execute query such as By name(given named parameters) cursor = self.db.cursor() cursor.execute("SELECT bookName, author from books where Id=:bookId" , bookId="155881") print cursor.bindnames() will print : ['BOOKID'] by position given a list of values cursor = self.db.cursor() cursor.prepare("insert into books (bookId,title,...


10

perhaps use csv module (from standard library): import csv cursor = connection.cursor() # assuming you know how to connect to your oracle db cursor.execute('select * from table_you_want_to_turn_to_csv') with open('output_file.csv', 'wb') as fout: writer = csv.writer(fout) writer.writerow([ i[0] for i in cursor.description ]) # heading row ...


10

You have not got a clntsh library to link against To fix this you need in /usr/lib to link libclntsh.dylib.10.1 to libclntsh.dylib and libocci.dylib.10.1 to libocci.dylib Note that I don't have the oracle library and so cannot confirm this will be sufficient.


10

Here's what I've come up with which appears to work well (but please comment if there's a way to improve this): # build rows for each date and add to a list of rows we'll use to insert as a batch rows = [] numberOfYears = endYear - startYear + 1 for i in range(numberOfYears): for j in range(12): # make a date for the first day of the month ...


9

error, = exc.args This is a case of sequence unpacking. A more readable way to write the same, and the style I personally favor, is: [error] = exc.args There are two bits required to understand the previous example: When the left hand side of an assignment is a recursive sequence of names, the value of the right hand side must be a sequence with the ...


9

for the query, you can look on timer and conn.cancel() call. something in those lines: t = threading.Timer(timeout,conn.cancel) t.start() cursor = conn.cursor() cursor.execute(query) res = cursor.fetchall() t.cancel()


9

Setting environment variable is the right way, but "AL32UTF8" is not the right value for NLS_LANG. To get the right value of the NLS_LANG used in your instance of Oracle, execute SELECT USERENV ('language') FROM DUAL


8

try: cursor.execute("select 1 / 0 from dual") except cx_Oracle.DatabaseError, exc: error, = exc print "Code:", error.code print "Message:", error.message This results in the following output: Code: 1476 Message: ORA-01476: divisor is equal to zero


8

Did you make sure to exclude the OCI.dll when you built with py2exe? If the version of the DLL on your machine is incompatible with the client version on another machine you test it on (I noticed you tried a 11g client but 10g on your machine), then this configuration will not work (I forget the actual error message though).


8

How can cursor.commit work when the methods in Cursor do not have commit, connections has this method and hence it should be: connection.commit() Using cursor.commit() returns: AttributeError: 'cx_Oracle.Cursor' object has no attribute 'commit'


8

I've found out that this happens in case when connection to Oracle is closed before the cx_Oracle.LOB.read() method is used. orcl = cx_Oracle.connect(usrpass+'@'+dbase) c = orcl.cursor() c.execute(sq) dane = c.fetchall() orcl.close() # before reading LOB to str wkt = dane[0][0].read() And I get: DatabaseError: Invalid handle! But the following code ...


8

I was able to solve this problem with the following steps: Download instantclient-basic-win32-10.2.0.5 from Oracle Website unzipped the into my c:\ with the name oraclient Created the directory structure C:\oraclient\network\admin to add the TNSNAMES.ORA Added the TNS_ADMIN env var pointing to C:\oraclient\network\admin Added the ORACLE_HOME env var ...


8

OK, what finally solved the problem (not sure whether all steps are necessary and no idea why exactly this and only this worked so far): Download and unzip version 12 from here. Add "ORACLE_HOME" as a Windows environment variable and set its value to ...\instantclient_12_1, (not its containing folder!). Add this same path to the "Path" environment variable....


8

When you run setup.py it will check for any of these folders on your ORACLE_HOME. possibleIncludeDirs = ["rdbms/demo", "rdbms/public", "network/public", "sdk/include"] Also the instant client sometimes places the include files, such as oci.h, in /usr/include/oracle//client, if there is no 'include' directory under ORACLE_HOME create a symbolic ...


7

You also need some type of Oracle client installed on your machine, since cx_Oracle is just a bridge between Python and the Oracle Client. Valid Oracle Clients include a full Oracle installation (like Standard or XE) or the Instant Client From the README: Please note that an Oracle client (or server) installation is required in order to use ...


7

Yes, you can do anonymous PL/SQL blocks. Your bind variable for the output parameter is not in the correct format. It should be :out instead of %(out)s cursor = connection.cursor() lOutput = cursor.var(cx_Oracle.STRING) cursor.execute(""" BEGIN :out := 'N'; END;""", {'out' : lOutput}) print lOutput ...


7

The query is never computed as a single string. The actual text of the query and the params are never interpolated and don't produce a real full string with both. That's the whole point of using parameterized queries - you separate the query from the data - preventing sql injections and limitations all in one go, and allowing easy query optimization. The ...


7

The best way is to call the procedure directly using callproc. curs.callproc['add_command_pkg.add_command',['7', 'sysdate + 7']] orcl.commit() or if you need to use keyword arguments directly use a dictionary not a list. curs.callproc['add_command_pkg.add_command' , {'command_id' : '7', 'expiry_time' : 'sysdate + 7'}] orcl.commit() The ...



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