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0

I've modified the code as follows queue() .defer(d3.json, "world-110m.json") .defer(d3.json, "http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/feed/v1.0/summary/all_month.geojson") .await(ready); function ready(error, world, centroid) { var minVal = 0; var maxVal = 0; d3.select('#slider1').call(d3.slider().axis(true).min(0).max(30).step(1).value([5, ...


0

There's something wrong with your geo data. It looks like it's already projected? I loaded it into QGIS and whilst the data looks OK, it seems to already have a projection applied. I found some Alberta electoral district data at http://www.electionsalberta.ab.ca/Public%20Website/112.htm and when I load in the shapefile from there, the two don't overlap. Not ...


0

Simply use css: svg { border:1px solid black; }


1

You could use SVG pattern fill and mask to achieve this: http://jsfiddle.net/henbox/wt45qfkz/2/ The pattern is borrowed from this answer to a previous question. Mask and pattern are applied to each individual pie slice using: var arcs = vis.selectAll("g.slice") .data(pie).enter() .append("svg:g") .attr("class", "slice") .attr("style", ...


0

First you need to change how you add the paths: svg.selectAll("path").data(points).enter().append("path") .datum(function(d) { return d;}) .attr("class", "line") .call(redraw); This takes the two points array, and add a path for every array inside of it. For each on of those sub arrays it binds the data of that array return d;. On the redraw ...


2

It's worth noting that the chaining is a little bit asymmetrical because append and insert have the side-effect of merging into the update selection. This means, if you add features on to the update selection after the append(), they will also be added on the enter nodes. On the other hand, the update selection is not merged into the enter selection. So ...


0

Exactly what Lars said. force.on("tick", function() { nodes[0].x = w / 2; nodes[0].y = h / 2;} this puts the first node in the middle of the screen (nodes[0] means first node) and if you want all the nodes to move to the right do something like this : nodes.attr("transform", function(d) { d.x = d.x + 400; //movement in x direction d.y ...


0

First you need to define a linear scale that would map the value of your node_size to an actual radius, as follows (example): r = d3.scale.linear().range([3,10]); Then specify as a domain, the values of your score parameter as follows (assuming DATA is your data structure) // first define your radius according to your formula specified in your question. ...


1

Please be advised, that this might be a bad question, due to it's "please give me code for this problem" character. Anyway, i think this is what you want to try i guess: .attr('r', function(d) { var r = 10 - (d.score / 50); if (r > 10) {r = 10;} else if (r < 3) {r = 3;} return r; });


2

Just providing a different take on the answer @Plato provided... In certain situations you may want the changed data to be recognised as "new", ie. be part of the enter selection, rather than just part of the update. In your example, it is considered part of the update selection because your data is being bound to DOM elements based on index (this is the ...


0

Digging into Snapsvg's isPointInside method may yield some insight into checking whether your center coordinate is over water.


2

take a look at "General update pattern" i think you aren't triggering d3's update selection var sizemapHeader = d3.select("#d3-sizemap-hr").selectAll("div") .data(arr_subpop_unique) sizemapHeader .enter() .append("div") .attr("class", "sizemap-hr-title ellipsis scroll_on_hover") sizemapHeader .html(function(d,i){ return d; }); sizemapHeader ...


0

this.axis .selectAll("g.axis-y") .data([{}]) this.axis .append("g") .attr("class", "axis-y") Is not the same as this.axis .selectAll("g.axis-y") .data([{}]) .append("g") .attr("class", "axis-y") This is the same... var thisAxis = this.axis .selectAll("g.axis-y") .data([{}]) thisAxis .append("g") ...


0

That approach won't work with a measure axis on x. However the solution is actually much simpler in this case. After drawing you can add a line with a bit of d3: svg.append("line") .attr("x1", x._scale(105)) .attr("x2", x._scale(105)) .attr("y1", myChart._yPixels()) .attr("y2", myChart._yPixels() + myChart._heightPixels()) ...


1

I've modified your code to incorporate the tooltip from your example link. The keys are this: 1.) Append the div tooltip to your html body (note, your html was malformed, it didn't have a body, I added those tags): var tooltip = d3.select('body') .append('div') .attr('class', 'tooltip') .style("opacity", 0); 2.) On mouseover/mouseout ...


0

Removing the color scale and directly applying the color will fic your problem. Color scale will map scalar numbers to colors. For example: 1 to red, 2 to yellow, etc. Since you already know the color then you don't need to use the color scale.


2

Mark has the right idea - the table system doesn't natively support this layout, so you need to take some manual control over how they are laid out. However, using somewhat obscure parts of the Plottable API, there is a cleaner and better-supported way to lay out the chart you want, which doesn't have the problem of the axes being slightly offset. The first ...


0

my 2 cents <input id="searchBox" onkeyup="checkFilled()" /> function checkFilled() { var inputVal = document.getElementById("searchBox").value; var sel = d3.selectAll("#" + circlesContainer + "").filter(function(d) { return this.id.match(new RegExp('^'+inputVal, 'i')); }); d3.selectAll("#" + circlesContainer).style('fill', 'white'); ...


0

function callout(parameters) { var w = parameters.width || 200, h = parameters.height || 100, a = w / 2, b = h / 2, o_x = parameters.x0 || 100, o_y = parameters.y0 || 100, m_r = parameters.l || 300, m_w = 10, m_q = parameters.angle * Math.PI / 180 || 50 * ...


0

group element has no x/y attributes - no problem! create ones: var node = svg.append("g") .attr('x',x_1) .attr('y',y_1) .attr("class","node") .attr("name","Node_A") .attr("transform","translate(" + x_1 + ", " + y_1 +")") .call(drag); when, the .origin function from Lars will work and ...


-1

You can stuff the "links" objects from the links array (nodes.links) into the links object in the nodes links array. (nodes.14.links). You can assign a variable for your original JSON object and then create a function link this. this function allows your to put in the name of the node and then it allows toy to pick the index of the links you want to link to ...


0

Just iterate over "nodes" keys and push values into new array: var nodes = data["nodes"]; var keys = nodes.keys(); var nodesArray = []; for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) { nodesArray.push(nodes[keys[i]]); } More info about keys method - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/keys Or using for ...


0

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/henbox/t3fam08j/1/. Note that I've added a few extra data points to make it easier to see what's going on. As per @user1614080's comment, start by getting the basic line chart to draw, before moving on to transition\ interpolation bits. For that, you need to make sure you apply the x and y scales to the points in ...


2

The reason is because in your first code example, you are appending to the element return from the data (which doesn't exists) whereas on the second one you are appending to the this.axis element which from your code is the svg element (this.axis = this.svg). You in order to make your first example you to work you need to call enter() when after you call ...


0

Little late to answer, but to get similar results but using multi-barchart as mentioned by Lars , you can use following command to get a similar graph (i.e hide "stacked" and "grouped", as well as legend buttons). n1$chart(showControls = FALSE, showLegend = FALSE)


1

Nevermind I got it figured d3.format(",.1f") Just incase someone need it.


1

http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3902569 function mousemove() { var x0 = x.invert(d3.mouse(this)[0]), i = bisectDate(data, x0, 1), d0 = data[i - 1], d1 = data[i], d = x0 - d0.date > d1.date - x0 ? d1 : d0; ... } This is code provided by an example from Mike. First you get the x-value of the scale you are using on ...


0

Just access the bound data as you would in any other handler function: function mousemoved(d,i) { // do something with d and i }


4

This is caused by the rendering of the svg and this is browser dependent. The lines are positioned on points that are not directly on pixels (they are float and not int). Additionally the width of the lines is set to .5px. These two facts cause the effect of missing lines on odd conditions. A simple fix is to just increase the widths of the lines to 1px. ...


0

This seems to be a browser issue. The lines are present in the inline svg content but both Chrome 41 and FF27 are having troubles rendering all tick lines. IE11 is doing fine. I don't think there is a way to work around this problem.


0

I added a sort to your d.co.map, and it seems to have done the trick: var dataset = dataset.map(function (d) { return d.co.map(function (o, i) { // Structure it so that your numeric // axis (the stacked amount) is y return { y: o.act_effort, x: o.number }; }).sort(function(a, b) { ...


0

Try sorting the data as shown below. var dataset = dataset.map(function (d) { var sortedData = d.co.sort(function(a,b){ return d3.ascending(a.number, b.number); }); return sortedData.map(function (o, i) { return { y: o.act_effort, x: o.number }; }); }); var dataset = [{ "effort": ...


0

DEMO: http://jsbin.com/firacaredi/2/ You can use just markers and not reconstruct intersections of ellipse with two vectors to produce precisely correct bezier path: var styles = { board: {width: 500, height: 400}, bubble: {id: "bubble", refX: 0, refY: 0, markerWidth: 200, markerHeight: 200, viewBox: "-4 -4 8 4"}, bubble_ellipse: {fill: "snow", ...


0

The other answers given so far use the strategy of removing and recreating divs. This isn't necessary. The problem with Al R.'s original code was just in the way it used the data key. The same data key function is used both for the old data and for the data that's newly passed in. Since in Al R.'s example, the old data was a simple array of numbers, and ...


0

var live_data = [...];// live values you should write and rewrite in this array ... var live_path = svg.append("svg:path").attr("d", live_line_form(live_data)); ... and the d attribute formatter: function live_line_form(array_of_values){ var d = "M", x_domain = 1.0, y_domain = 1.0; array_of_values.forEach(function(val, i){ d = d + i * ...


2

To fix the code, you should implement little bit of trigonometry: // Appending circles at intersections svg.selectAll(".datapoints") // it doubles line [*] .data(dataset).enter() .append("svg:circle") // full notation for the node .classed({"datapoints": true}) // [*] selection.classed() method for classes, ...


3

It seems like you already have a <div> inside the element with an ID of d3-sizemap-hr. The reason this is a problem is that you are only populating elements in the .enter() state, which will not occur for the existing div. I have the following recommendations: Always have a unique class for your dynamically added elements with D3 Have the minimum ...


0

I recommend you to draw data points like markers: DEMO: http://jsbin.com/sepunibove/2/ By the way, multiple .attr() lines: .attr("class", "datapoints") .attr("r", 3) you can write like single associative array: .attr({"class": "datapoints", "r": 3})


0

In the above answer an update step is needed for transition of divs with the same key. illustrative jsfiddle showing what happens with/without update function. Update function is just selection.stuff, rather than selection.enter().stuff : //add a container div to the body and add a class var updateDiv = d3.select("#updateDiv").attr("class", "bluediv"); ...


0

You want to insert the file name into your template, not the contents of the file. It looks like you're reading the data into your view function and then inserting the data into your template. Just insert the file name instead, and let d3.text do it's thing (you could also use d3.csv, which is what I would use). ie: def viewCSV(request): variables = ...


0

Your external JSON file appears to have the 'children' element with a capital 'C' for the lower tiers of data, but with lower case 'c' at the top tier. Additionally they were misspelled as 'Childern' which may have been causing problems (you will want to check your JavaScript to see how you spelled it there and make it consistent). I was able to do a quick ...


1

Nearly impossible to debug this without access to the working code (or a fiddle). But from just glancing at it, a couple of things stand out: You're applying rotation to the entire gaugeGroup, which contains both the hours and minutes hands, and then you apply local rotation to the minute group. This might be appropriate but only if detune is a relative ...


0

It still wasn't clear to me when I read the @Ben Lyall answer (sorry Ben, its not you, it's me...) and it's certainly not clear to me from reading the wiki (I think they got it backwards), so I traced through the code to see what's going on... First of all, it's worth remembering that a selection is an array of groups and a group is an array of nodes. If ...


0

It would probably be easier to build each plot in it's own svg. What you have now, suffers from too many magic numbers syndrome. Once you start hand entering pixel positions, you need to rethink your approach. For example: build_yaxis_path('vwl', data2, 290, 160, -20, 20); //<- why 290, why 160? That said, this line is throwing off your scale (well ...


0

Not to clear in the comments but maybe something like or similar may work: JS: pseudo for zoom : var zoomEnd = false; if(zoom < min ){ zoom = min, var zoomEnd = true; } if(zoom > max){ zoom = max, var zoomEnd = true; } Check if zoomEnd=true (i.e: zoom is at min or max zoom): if(zoomEnd =true) { d3.select('svg').classed('scroll', true) } ...


2

You need to include <meta charset="utf-8"> in your HTML. d3 uses some special math symbols that aren't available in plain ASCII so you need to tell the browser to use UTF-8. (for examples see the definition of d3.random.normal, line 7396 in 3.5)


0

You thought right - the selection returned is the last element appended. So to nest g elements inside a parent g, what you want to do is this: var outer_g = svg .attr("width", vizW + margin.left + margin.right) .attr("height", vizH + margin.top + margin.bottom) .append("g") // this will cause the outer 'g' selection to be returned .attr('class', ...


0

Remove .data().enter in .select scope.attrs.svg = d3.select(jqElm[0]) .append('svg') .attr('width', scope.attrs.width + scope.attrs.margin.left + scope.attrs.margin.right) .attr('height', scope.attrs.height + scope.attrs.margin.top + scope.attrs.margin.bottom) .append('g') .attr('transform', 'translate(' + scope.attrs.margin.left + ',' + ...


1

Try this d3.select('input[name="group-stack"]:checked').node().value


0

ah... got it d3.select('input[name="group-stack"]:checked')[0][0].value



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