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31

I think David's comment is very accurate and excellent. However, as someone who has done development in both but is not a developer on either perhaps I can be slightly more objective (and technical) in what the differences are. Both frameworks provide a variation on the Web MVC paradigm. Catalyst's main level of abstraction is the Controller. Catalyst ...


28

This is a somewhat subjective question, but I'll try to give you an answer in an objective way. First things first, a disclaimer: I'm part of the Dancer development team, so my opinion should of course be considered somewhat biased :) Catalyst is more widely used than Dancer, and so there's more community support behind it - if you were to look for ...


27

I've spent the last day reading about the various components and I think I have enough of an understanding to answer my own question. Most of my answer can be found in various places on the web, but hopefully there will be some value to putting all the pieces in one place: Nginx: The first and most obvious piece of the stack to understand is nginx. Nginx ...


20

You need to first decide what you are trying to do. Are you trying to write a dynamic site, generating web pages whose content vary depending on requests or are you trying to make building a static web site easier? Either way, you should learn HTML on its own, and write some static web pages by hand. Then, realize that you can use Template::Toolkit's ttree ...


13

The expression 'values' => @list expands to a list that contains "values" "one" "two" "three", so you should try with a reference to the array instead: template 'list.tt', { 'values' => [@list], }; The above still copies @list and returns a reference. If you want to fetch a reference to the already existing array use \@list.


13

Is the computer connected to internet? I got the same problem when testing from a computer not connected to internet; fixed it by deleting <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>; from main.tt


12

What makes you think it's being wrapped in HTML and BODY elements? use Dancer; get '/robots.txt' => sub { return "User-agent: *\nDisallow: /\n"; }; dance; Output: >lwp-request -e http://127.0.0.1:3000/robots.txt 200 OK Server: Perl Dancer 1.3112 Content-Length: 26 Content-Type: text/html Client-Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2013 05:05:32 GMT Client-Peer: ...


8

Use the --pid /path/to/the/pid.file and you can kill the process based on his PID So, using the above options, you can use kill $(cat /path/to/the/pid.file) the pid.file simply stores the master's PID - don't need analyze the ps output...


7

OK, here is the good way to do it. It can of course be a plugin. You should never do this kind of things by hacking inside Dancer's core, you should rather always consider implementing a route handler to do the job: #!/usr/bin/env perl use Dancer; use File::Spec; use Dancer::FileUtils 'read_file_content'; use Dancer::MIME; use HTTP::Date; # your routes ...


7

Use Plack::App::URLMap to setup a virtualhost in Starman (or whatever PSGI compatible web servers): use Plack::App::URLMap; my $en_app = generate_app('en'); my $ru_app = generate_app('ru'); my $app = Plack::App::URLMap->new; $app->map("http://en.example.com/" => $en_app); $app->map("http://ru.example.com/" => $ru_app); $app->to_app; in ...


7

The success handler will be triggered if The response has HTTP status code 200 (yours does) jQuery is able to deserialize the response according to the Content-Type header in the response (or the dataType option, if you provide it, which overrides the Content-Type header) So for instance, if your response had a Content-Type header of application/json or ...


6

First of all, make sure you're passing what you think you're passing to the template. Assign the result of $sth->fetchall_hashref($key_field) to a temporary scalar, then dump it with Data::Dump or Data::Dumper (or see Dancer::Plugin::DebugDump for a way to make it dead easy).


6

The after_file_render hook is run after each successful request for a static file (e.g., a CSS file or an image), while the after hook runs after an action is performed by a route handler. If you want to run the same code for both after and after_file_render, you can put it in a subroutine and assign it to the two hooks using a reference, e.g.: sub foo { ...


6

I'll wager it's because you have to pass an array reference to the 'values': template 'list.tt', { 'values' => \@list, }; Otherwise the list gets expanded and you're actually passing: template 'list.tt', { 'values' => $list[0], $list[1] => $list[2], };


6

You can't pass anything but a simple scalar value if you are using the default Dancer template engine. But if you enable Template::Toolkit as the engine then all kinds of things are possible. You can do this globally by setting template: template_toolkit in the YAML config file, or you can set it just for this route by writing get '/' => sub { my ...


6

The other option for sending robots.txt would be to not define a route for it and instead put an actual robots.txt file into the public/ subdirectory under your main Dancer app directory. Dancer will then serve it automatically as a regular file without passing it through the route handlers, templates, etc.


5

Here is one way. Create your app on system-a: dancer -a Foo cd Foo perl Makefile.PL make dist scp Foo-0.1.tar.gz system-b: ssh system-b On system-b: sudo tar xf Foo-0.1.tar.gz -C /opt cd /opt/Foo-0.1 perl Makefile.PL # this will tell you the deps you need to install # install needed deps if any make sudo make install ./bin/app.pl # this starts your app ...


5

(This is more of a comment than an answer, but it's too big.) I just ran this program: #!/usr/bin/perl -w use warnings; use strict; use Devel::Peek (); use Digest::SHA (); my $x = 'flurbe'; Devel::Peek::Dump $x; print Digest::SHA::sha512_hex($x), "\n\n"; utf8::upgrade $x; Devel::Peek::Dump $x; print Digest::SHA::sha512_hex($x), "\n"; __END__ and ...


5

Your Answer is so far correct, but it would be better to set up nginx the following way: server { listen 80; server_name foo.example.com; location / { # Serve static files directly: if (-f $request_filename) { expires 30d; break; } # Pass on other requests to Dancer app ...


4

You could call engine to get the Dancer::Template object and call its render method, e.g.: my $template_engine = engine 'template'; my $content = $template_engine->render('/path/to/template.tt', { 'name' => 'value' }); Then, to return the rendered content in the default layout, call apply_layout: return $template_engine->apply_layout($content); ...


4

Catalyst provides the same abstraction that Dancer does, Dancer's strength or rather Catalyst's weakness or rather Dancer's weakness is in how Catalyst forces the developer to adhere to Perl OO best practices and the MVC design pattern. After doing webapps for a while, this will all become apparent.


4

Check out HTML::FormFu. I've not used it, but I hear good things from the Catalyst community, and some Dancer stuff seems to use it to.


4

Do not reinvent the wheel, you will repeat errors of the past that are already fixed. Use logrotate. It is a unix tool for specifically this kind of task. To rotate your logs you would usually create a logrotate config for your task in /etc/logrotate.d/. For example to daily rotate and keep your logs for 14 days: # /etc/logrotate.d/dancer-error-log ...


4

Well, I noticed the Debug panel isn't shown, meaning Plack::Middlewares::Debug isn't loaded. With help from How to use Dancer with Plack middlewares | PerlDancer Advent Calendar and Plack::Middleware::Debug::Dancer::Version I managed to turn it on session: PSGI ## Dancer::Session::PSGI plack_middlewares: - - Session - - CSRFBlock ...


4

We don't really need to be hand-wavy about how many iterations (or recursions) of your function there will be. I believe at every invocation, the expected number of iterations is geomtrically distributed (i.e. number of trials before first success is governed by the geomtric distribution), which has mean 1/p, where p is the probability of successfully ...


4

From an academic stance this seems like an interesting program to work on. But if you're on the clock and just need random and distinct strings I'd go with the Data::GUID module. use strict; use warnings; use Data::GUID qw( guid_string ); my $guid = guid_string();


4

YAML requires consistent indentation for the keys of a hash. Remove four spaces from before "two:" and it should parse. Update: I see there's been some editing of indentation; going back to the original question produces a parsing error in a different place and shows a mixture of tabs and spaces being used; try to consistently use only tabs or only spaces. ...


4

You need to include the full filename - my_sidebar.tt - in your INCLUDE. Dancer automatically appends a configurable extension (.tt by default) to the name of the main template, but TT doesn't know about that setting.


4

id will contains everything from /user/ on until an optional slash. get qr{^/users/?(?<id>[^/]+)?$} => sub { my $captures = captures; if ( defined $captures->{id} ) { return sprintf 'the id is: %s', $captures->{id}; } else { return 'global user page' } };


4

"It seems the variable var is shared in both request-response processes" because it is. The our keyword declares a package global. You're running your Dancer app in a persistent environment, your global variables are persistent also. You're going to need to reset any our variables at the beginning of each request.



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