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30

Use window.animationFrame, the Future-based cousin of the traditional window.requestAnimationFrame. Dart has been shifting to use Future and Stream as more object-oriented ways to handle asynchronous operations. The callback-based (old 'n busted) requestAnimationFrame is replaced by the Future-based (new hotness) animationFrame. Here is a sample: import ...


13

Authentication is a vast topic and you didn't specify much what you want to achieve, but let me guide you to build a Facebook authentication for you Dart application, because I think it's the simplest one to begin with. Why? Because we don't need to talk about every possible database you might be using, or how you setup your database structure, models, etc. ...


10

In addition to Timer mentioned by Chris, there is a Future-based API: var future = new Future.delayed(const Duration(milliseconds: 10), doStuffCallback); There is not yet direct support for cancelling a Future callback, but this works pretty well: var future = new Future.delayed(const Duration(milliseconds: 10)); var subscription = ...


10

Answering a bit out of order Which one should I use: you should use dart:html it provides the cleanest abstraction on top of the DOM. why cant I use both: it should strictly not be needed, but you can actually get to the underlying dart:dom implementations from dart:html using a dirty hack described here. The better and more clean solution is to use Dart's ...


7

Lars did an excellent job with your question. I'll just add to: why cant I use both You can, actually. The problem is that both libraries use the same names for a few things (mainly window). When you import both of them, those names collide, which Dart doesn't allow. To resolve that, you can import one of them with a prefix: #import('dart:html'); ...


7

DocumentFragment will do the job. This: my_element.nodes.add(new DocumentFragment.html('&©')); will output &© in your HTML document.


6

An update to all the answers, and probably makes this question no longer applicable is that dart:dom has been deprecated. See this post on dartlang website.


6

From this post on the group (Feb 14th 2013). // Old Version window.setTimeout(() { doStuff(); }, 0); // New Version import 'dart:async'; Timer.run(doStuffCallback); And another example (copied from the same post) // Old version: var id = window.setTimeout(doStuffCallback, 10); .... some time later.... window.clearTimeout(id); id = ...


6

One approach is to use a Future pattern to accomplish this: Future<SomeType> initMyObject(){ final c = new Completer(); // Do my object init stuff // and when it is complete: c.complete(instanceOfSomeType); // Return the Future object to any subscribers. return c.future; } Then elsewhere you can get notified like so: ...


6

The problem is that the image hasn't loaded by the time you call drawImage (as opposed to when it is embedded in the page and loads before the dart code runs). You should listen for the onLoad stream and only draw the image once it is loaded: ImageElement img = new ImageElement(src: "img.png"); img.onLoad.listen((value) => context.drawImage(img, 0, ...


6

You're probably using Element.innerHtml. You should use Element.setInnerHtml instead. As you can see with the parameters of this new method, the HTML code is now validated and filtered. To restore the old behavior, you must provide a validator or a tree sanitizer allowing all attributes. To explicitly allow "data" on anchors and buttons: // Call ...


5

Let's say I'm in other code that doesn't know anything about the first two click handlers, but I register another one. Can I know that the stream has two listeners? No, you can't. You could extend the stream class or wrap it and provide this functionality yourself, but it does not feel like a good design choice, because I don't think a listener ...


5

To achieve the same thing with Streams, here's an example: Element.keyUpEvent.forTarget(document.body, useCapture: true).listen((e) { // Do your stuff. print('Here we go'); }); The method we used above, creates a stream for you with capture mode. The Stream interface (listen() method) is quite generic, and thus can't have this specific functionality ...


5

You can display a message box easily with : window.alert('test'); don't forget this in the top of your file: import 'dart:html'; This will behave like the alert function in JavaScript. If you want to add buttons (other then the default "ok" button) to your message window, then you will need to make a custom window, which would not be very hard. You ...


5

The way your code is currently organized, you're querying for #test before the the HTML fragment has been appended to the div. If you do the stuff requiring #test in the callback, things should work: HttpRequest.getString(fileName).then((resp) { div.appendHtml(resp); Element elem = query("#test"); if (elem == null) print("element is null"); }); ...


5

Update Polymer now provides support for this out of the box this.injectBoundHTML('<div>your HTML goes here ${someBoundFieldValue}</div>); Old This is the code of the <safe-html> tag I'm using. library safe_html; import 'dart:async'; import "dart:html"; import "package:polymer/polymer.dart"; @CustomTag("safe-html") class SafeHtml ...


5

The dart:io library is available for server side processes similar to Node.js. It allows developers to have one language on both the client and the server. It provides capabilities such as creating native sockets, native file i/o etc, that cannot be accomplished client side (in any language) due to the sandboxing restrictions. SQLJockey uses the ability to ...


5

I tried it and it worked for me: import 'dart:html' as dom; main () { dom.document.head.append(new dom.StyleElement()); final styleSheet = dom.document.styleSheets[0] as dom.CssStyleSheet; final rule = 'div { color: blue; }'; styleSheet.insertRule(rule, 0); }


4

You can use HTML5 and LocalStorage. It's a persistent storage, but can only be accessed by the browser. If you want the user to be able to open the file outside the browser, just make the "save" button a download action.


4

you could simplify your life and run both server/client scripts from the same host:port address. There is a small webserver example at http://www.dartlang.org/articles/io/#web-servers that serves static files too. Add your '/api' handler and make sure your client files are in the same directory. The example server is a lot slower than the Dart Editor builtin ...


4

The while loop in the main() method never returns to let the browser thread draw. This is why it only works when you step through it. This alternative works: using window.setInterval, to call a function every 16ms, but it may not be the correct way for a game loop. void main() { var exit = false; FunTime game = new FunTime(); Date previousDraw = new ...


4

You could also write a query selector to only return radio buttons. List<RadioButtonInputElement> list = element.querySelectorAll("input[type='radio']");


4

Was facing the same problem. Below is my server code. It just prints the query parameters. Added access control headers to fix the issue. HttpServer.bind('127.0.0.1', 8080).then((server){ server.listen((HttpRequest request){ request.uri.queryParameters.forEach((param,val){ print(param + '-' + val); }); ...


4

When working with the Canvas, the cascade operator .. can help make the code more readable: context..lineWidth = 3 ..strokeStyle = "black" ..strokeText(line, x, y) ..fillStyle = "white" ..fillText(line, x, y);


4

You can use js interop to do this: import 'dart:js'; main() { var result = context.callMethod('prompt', ['Hello from Dart!']); print(result); } I'm not sure why this is not available in dart:html. Perhaps file a bug. Ideally you'd be able to use another UI component library to do this, rather than using window.prompt(). Something like these. But ...


4

Cookies can't hold much information. Sounds like you want to store more. First have a look at local storage - sample here. Or you can consider using lawndart which is an api built on top of indexeddb and websql (for Safari). Here is a tutorial about indexed db.


4

You can keep each parts in their own file and load them like that : HttpRequest.getString("part.html").then((html) { querySelector('#container').innerHtml = html; });


4

While writing this question and retrying to make sure I tried anything before asking here, I found the following solution. It seems like Dartium (Chrome with a native Dart VM) has a bug (issue 12224) where changes to the viewBox are not reflected directly. Adding the following code after changes to the viewBox forces Dartium to somehow resize to the ...


4

You can use basic CSS to show/hide the elements. HTML <div id="container" class="show-buttons"> <button id="button-A" class="btn" data-group="a">...</button> <button id="button-B" class="btn" data-group="b">...</button> <form id="form-A" class="form group-a">...</button> <form id="form-B" ...


4

There are many horrible stupid examples out there where you are able to play the current audio recording in the current browser window. Is there ever a use case for this. For video I can imaging that one want to build a Skype like application and have a preview window to see if you look stupid on the video, but audio ... I found one good post though: From ...



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