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18

The problem is that --exclude="*" says to exclude (for example) the 1260000000/ directory, so rsync never examines the contents of that directory, so never notices that the directory contains files that would have been matched by your --include. I think the closest thing to what you want is this: rsync -nrv --include="*/" --include="file_11*.jpg" ...


16

I got tired to forget the system_profiler SPUSBDataType syntax, so I made an lsusb alternative myself. You can find it here , or install it with homebrew: brew update && brew tap jlhonora/lsusb && brew install lsusb


16

I found the answer myself, really easy: import Darwin let pi = M_PI Update: As noted in the comments, pi can also be used as unicode character in Swift, so you might as well do let π = M_PI alt + p is the shortcut (on US-keyboards) that will create the π unicode character.


12

It looks like you can use -dyld_env, like so: "-dyld_env DYLD_FRAMEWORK_PATH=/". This isn't documented in the man page, but can be found in ld64's Options.cpp and mentioned in the Changelog file. If you're trying to do it from Xcode, you'll probably have to do it like this: "-Xlinker -dyld_env -Xlinker DYLD_FRAMEWORK_PATH=/". One thing to note: if you look ...


9

This thread also discusses this issue. I think the key point is that in order to get the Linux-like linking behavior, you need to specify the "-undefined dynamic_lookup" flag. By default, the Darwin linker throws an error if there are any undefined references in a dynamic library. You can also use -U to set this behavior on a per-symbol basis. See 'man ...


8

Process info comes from pidinfo: cristi:~ diciu$ grep proc_pidinfo /usr/include/libproc.h int proc_pidinfo(int pid, int flavor, uint64_t arg, void *buffer, int buffersize); cpu load comes from host_statistics: cristi:~ diciu$ grep -r host_statistics /usr/include/ /usr/include/mach/host_info.h:/* host_statistics() */ ...


8

You should fill the sin_len field as well (with sizeof(struct sockaddr_in), that should do the trick). This field is not appearing on each platform, but on which it exists, it must be filled. Futhermore, be sure to bzero the structure before using it (but it clearly seems you did it anyway).


8

Well, I figured it out. To handle mach exceptions, you have to register a mach port for the exceptions you are interested in. You then wait for a message to arrive on the port in another thread. When a message arrives, you call exc_server() whose implementation is provided by System.library. exec_server() takes the message that arrived and calls one of ...


8

The pragmatic answer // Returns monotonic time in nanos, measured from the first time the function // is called in the process. The clock may run up to 0.1% faster or slower // than the "exact" tick count. uint64_t monotonicTimeNanos() { uint64_t now = mach_absolute_time(); static struct Data { Data(uint64_t bias_) : bias(bias_) { ...


7

On Darwin file I/O is 64-bit by default (10.5 at least), just found this by grepping in /usr/include: sys/_types.h:typedef __int64_t __darwin_off_t; unistd.h:typedef __darwin_off_t off_t; So all you need to do is something like #ifdef __APPLE__ # define off64_t off_t # define fopen64 fopen ... #endif


7

If your executable is structured as part of a standard OS X application bundle (i.e. a .app that can be launched by a user), the conventional way to specify application specific environment variables is through its plist file using the LSEnvironment key. See here for more information.


6

Based on an answer by Randy Howard, I had a look at the XNU source code for this. The file syscalls.master has the list of all syscalls. That file describes the signature of psynch_cvwait like this: uint32_t psynch_cvwait( user_addr_t cv, uint64_t cvlsgen, uint32_t cvugen, user_addr_t mutex, uint64_t mugen, uint32_t flags, int64_t sec, ...


5

Look into the com.apple.eawt package. Specifically, when you initialize your app, do something like the following: if (System.getProperty("os.name").startsWith("Mac OS X")) { // only do this setup if we know this is a Mac com.apple.eawt.Application macApp = com.apple.eawt.Application.getApplication(); java.awt.PopupMenu menu = new ...


5

Since you say no Objective-C we'll rule out most of the MacOS frameworks. You can get CPU time using getrusage(), which gives the total amount of User and System CPU time charged to your process. To get a CPU percentage you'd need to snapshot the getrusage values once per second (or however granular you want to be). #include <sys/resource.h> struct ...


5

From: Developer Connection - Indirect Addressing Indirect addressing is the name of the code generation technique that allows symbols defined in one file to be referenced from another file, without requiring the referencing file to have explicit knowledge of the layout of the file that defines the symbol. Therefore, the defining file can be modified ...


5

Well, it's right there in the Usage message. [ -c | -d | -u] means you can use one of those possibilities, not two. Since OSX is based on BSD, you can check that here or, thanks to Ignacio, the more Apple-specific one here. If you want to achieve a similar output, you could use: do_your_thing | uniq -c | grep -v '^ *1 ' which will strip out all those ...


5

To specify what architecture to compile for, specify the architecture feature when invoking b2. To specify compiler options that don't already have built-in features, specify the cxxflags feature when invoking b2. To specify linker options that don't already have built-in features, specify the linkflags feature when invoking b2. All of these are listed in ...


4

Try printing the st_rdev member. The manual page says: struct stat { dev_t st_dev; /* device inode resides on */ [ ... snip ... ] dev_t st_rdev; /* device type, for special file inode */ }; I think you're not printing the same field that the %r formatter accesses. You're not interested in the device the device file is on, but the ...


4

Darwin does not have Aqua or any of the Core technologies, so only pure POSIX apps can be tested.


4

There is a site that provides patches for and arm darwin kernel. Darwin on ARM develops and provides patches for the Apple Darwin-xnu kernel sources so that it can be cross-compiled to run on an ARM processor. This ubuntu forum entry shows how to install the arm-linux-gcc cross compiler. Put the two together and you should get what you asked for.


4

Try -Wl,--gc-sections. As regards -dead_strip (what you probably meant by -dead_code): Before turning on the -dead_strip option your project will first have to be "ported" to work with dead code stripping. This will include changing from -gused (the default for -g) to -gfull and re-compiling all of the objects files being linked into your ...


4

I assume you installed a pre-compiled version (i.e. from DMG rather than from sources tar.gz). The version of OSX you see in the welcome message is the version it was compiled with (the packagers'), not the version it is running on (yours.)


4

A true random sequence of numbers cannot be generated by an algorithm. They can only produce pseudo-random sequence of numbers (something that looks like a random sequence). So depending on the algorithm chosen, the quality of the "randomness" may vary. The quality of arc4random() sequences is generally considered to have a good randomness. You cannot ...


3

The way the odcctools makeflags are set up, you can't use CFLAGS -- you have to set both CC and CXX: CC="gcc -m32" CXX="g++ -m32" ./configure blah blah blah Note that I had to add a -fpermissive to my CXX to get it to run but this may not be necessary! Also, you may be interested in this post (although it wasn't sufficient for my setup). (If anyone has ...


3

In human-speak: the compiler generates stubs with $non_lazy_ptr appended to them to speed up linking. You're probably seeing that function Foo referenced from _Foo$non_lazy_ptr is undefined, or something like that - these are not the same thing. Make sure that the symbol is actually declared and exported in the object files/libraries you're linking your app ...


3

The desktop uses the Mach call host_statistics64() to get that information. You can see it in use in the source code for the vm_stat command.


3

You're compiling header files (.hpp) which you shouldn't do yet. Only compile source files (.cpp) Rather than compiling all .cpp files, compile them one at a time and then link them appropriately. g++ -c x.cpp g++ -c y.cpp g++ -c z.cpp g++ -o tst x.o y.o z.o Note that only one of your .cpp files can have a main() function - otherwise the OS won't know ...


3

You are correct. Set kIOMemoryPurgeable as one of the options when you request the memory. It starts off as nonvolatile, and may be paged out, but won't be discarded. When you want to let the OS discard it, call setPurgeable(kIOMemoryPurgeableVolatile, &oldState ); and the OS will discard it if necessary, rather than paging it to disk. When you want ...



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