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I had the same issue and ended up using Kyle's approach but unfortunately it breaks when numbers like 120000 are used, showing 12k instead of 120K and I needed to show small numbers like: 1.1K instead of rounding down to 1K. So here's my edit from Kyle's original idea: Results: [self abbreviateNumber:987] ---> 987 [self abbreviateNumber:1200] ---> ...


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First you need to convert Date to unicode string and now you can convert with derived column element. Derived Column Code: (DT_DATE)(SUBSTRING(col,FINDSTRING(col,"/",2) + 1,4) + "-" + SUBSTRING(col,1,FINDSTRING(col,"/",1) - 1) + "-" + SUBSTRING(col,FINDSTRING(col,"/",1) + 1,FINDSTRING(col,"/",2) - FINDSTRING(col,"/",1) - 1)) Result: ...


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I had the same problem and needed an application to convert a CSV file to a XML file for one of my project but didn't find anything free and good enough on the net so I coded my own Java Swing CSVtoXML application. It's available from my website HERE. Hope it will help you. If not code your own like me. The source code is inside the jar file so modify it as ...


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I would use a Script Transformation for this. You can then leverage the .NET Framework which has far superior functionality e.g. DateTime.TryParse.


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Your error is because of this line: dNumber = stod(Equation); Its exception documentation says: If no conversion could be performed, an std::invalid_argument exception is thrown. When you entered a letter, no conversion could be performed and you got the exception. Secondly, you're trying to convert the entire equation to a double.. If that is the case, ...


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First improvement: Replace pow and the associated conversions with a left shift (<<).


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You can use the std::bitset<> class. See sample below. #include <bitset> #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { bitset<64> allBits("010010000110010101101100011011000110111100100001"); cout << allBits.to_ullong(); // C++ 11. If using earlier version, use to_ulong(). } Note that the integer will need to ...


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This code will find all dems in a folder and apply the conversion function and save the output tiffs to another folder #START USER INPUT datadir="Y:/input_rasters/" #directory where dem files are located outputdir="Y:/output_rasters/" #existing directory where output tifs are to be saved in #END USER INPUT import os arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True ...


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int dodgy(char* buf, unsigned input) { return sprintf(buf, "%x.%02x", input/256, input&0xff); } string dodgy2(unsigned input) { char buf[(CHAR_BIT * sizeof input + 11)/4]; dodgy(buf, input); return string(buf); }


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Hex is a print representation, not a value type. It sounds like BCD to me, in which case it all makes sense. You just have to convert it to decimal, nibble-wise, i.e. 4 bits at a time, and insert the decimal point before the last two digits. There's plenty of BDC to ASCII code around, and it's not hard to figure out yourself. The important thing is to figure ...


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db.programs_bak.find({}).forEach(function(doc) { db.programs.update( { _id: doc._id }, {$set : { "showed" : doc.showed._i}}); });


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Typically your inputs will conform to some sort of pattern that can be used to do the parsing using SUBSTRING() with CHARINDEX() { aka STRPOS(), POSITION() }. E.g. find the first hyphen and the second hyphen and take the data between them. If not (and assuming your character range is limited to ASCII) then your best bet would be to nest 26+ REPLACE() ...


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binary means base 2 so if you have for example 10100 and you need the base 10you could apply the following pattern, going from the last element to the first (right to left): 2^0*0 + 2^1*0 + 2^2*1 + 2^3*0 + 2^4*1 = 20 you just raise 2 to power a starting from 0 to length_of_binary_num-1 and you multiply that power with the binary digit from your ...



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