Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

to expand on ekad's answer: what you would typically do, if you must start from an integer, is use a calculated property public int AnInteger { get; set; } public bool IntAsBoolean { get { return AnInteger > 0; } }


1

You can Directly convert in stored procedure from int column to bit CONVERT(bit,ColumnValue) or can Use If Else In C# code


0

I have found this as the best answer for the question, since I haven't found a direct way without the use of a temporary file. Write the OpenCV Mat to a CSV File: #include <fstream> void MeasureTool::writeCSV(string filename, cv::Mat m) { cv::Formatter const * c_formatter(cv::Formatter::get("CSV")); ofstream myfile; ...


0

In Java 8, you can use streams: int[] spam = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }; Arrays.stream(spam) .boxed() .collect(Collectors.toList());


0

Thank you to Daniel and all other valid comments. The main question was if float/double conversions were possible with any preexisting function. My understanding after all this (correct me plz if I'm wrong) is no. So one must go trough the math and conversion for floating points (lots of documentation on IEEE 754 online...) and use strtol for integers. ...


0

This is quite simple really... unsigned int number; char str[33]; int i; int s; /* Read some 32-bit binary number in character representation in str. */ Do some stuff. /* Convert from string to binary. */ number = 0; s = strlen(str); for (i = 0; i < s; i++) { if (str[i] == 0x00) break; if (str[i] == '0') { number |= 1; ...


2

The following should do what you want to achieve: A <- read.csv("AU.csv", stringsAsFactors = FALSE) ## One vector with all of the data in square brackets A1 <- regmatches(A[[2]], gregexpr("\\[.*?\\]", A[[2]])) LA1 <- lengths(A1) A1 <- gsub("\\[|\\]", "", unlist(A1)) ## One vector with all of the other data A2 <- regmatches(A[[2]], ...


0

I wrote the following C code for a project some time ago. It;s a little dated but it worked with matlab 2011a. It should serve as an example if nothing else. It does make a number of assumptions - mostly documented. Input parameters are the filename to write to, an array of pointers to CvMat, an array of names for these matrices and the number of matrices ...


0

You can do some various manipulations with regular expressions, and use plyr and foreach functions to process everything. Here is an example of the first row library(foreach) library(plyr) str1 = '[Sorce, A.; Greco, A.; Magistri, L.] Univ Genoa, Polytech Sch, Thermochem Power Grp TPG DIME, I-16145 Genoa, Italy; [Costamagna, P.] Univ Genoa, Polytech Sch, ...


0

If you need long/lat you should probably generate the random points using that coordinate reference system. But otherwise, create a SpatialPoints object and use spTransform. That is, do something like this (replace the ???): library(rgdal) sputm <- SpatialPoints(randompoints, proj4string=CRS("+proj=utm +zone=??? +datum=WGS84") spgeo <- ...


-3

I found the following video useful in understanding the same https://youtu.be/_ntIzftXKMM?list=PLvEpMintaVv2D_jgt7xw-cpyrc01VSAAt


1

I don't claim it is the shortest possible, but it is much shorter than yours. And once you have it, you can reuse it. I don't completely agree with these claims how Fotran is bad at string processing, I do tokenization, recursive descent parsing and similar stuff just fine in Fortran, although it is easier in some other languages with richer libraries. ...


0

The drawback of Alexander's example (I don't have enough reputation to be allowed to comment his answer) is the unability to use an index (if there is one). Better use the following query (if the value is always stored in scientific notation): SELECT * FROM <table> where [Sales Key] = format(311886016, 'E')


0

Obviously the real problem is that you are using the wrong data type, but chances are you can't change that now. Just search through it like a Varchar. SELECT * FROM <table> WHERE [Sales Key] LIKE '311886016%'


1

In a varchar column, the search is a string matching, not a integer value matching. You could use this (but it will be quite slow): SELECT * FROM <table> where cast(cast([Sales Key] as real) as float) = 311886016


1

Its because when you write the SQL SELECT * FROM <table> where [Sales Key] = '311886016' Its trying to compare the characters '3.11886e+008' with '311886016' which will not match.


0

Jackson processor family has backends for multiple data formats, not just JSON. This includes both XML (https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-dataformat-xml) and CSV (https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-dataformat-csv/) backends. Conversion would rely on reading input with CSV backend, write using XML backend. This is easiest to do if you have (or can ...


1

See Thinktecture.IdentityModel.Client.EpochTimeExtensions public static class EpochTimeExtensions { /// <summary> /// Converts the given date value to epoch time. /// </summary> public static long ToEpochTime(this DateTime dateTime) { var date = dateTime.ToUniversalTime(); var ticks = date.Ticks - new ...



Top 50 recent answers are included