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2

how about this: String name_list_file = "/home/matthias/Workbench/SUTD/nytimes_corpus/NYTimesCorpus/2005/01/02/test/people_test.txt"; String single_name; try ( // read in the original file, list of names, w/e InputStream stream_for_name_list_file = new FileInputStream( name_list_file ); ...


1

You could manually set the key names, something like: ArrayNode array = mapper.createArrayNode(); for (Entry entry: yourMap.entries()) { ObjectNode node = mapper.createObjectNode() .put("name", entry.key()) .putPOJO("ids", entry.value()); array.add(node); } mapper.writeValue(file, array); Alternatively, you could create a class for your ...


0

public class tenaryOperationToTree { private class TreeNode { char c; TreeNode left; TreeNode right; public TreeNode(char c) { this.c = c; left = null; right = null; } } public TreeNode toTree(String s) { if (s.length() == 0) { return null; } ...


1

Have you tried using MySql migration toolkit? If not you may try it. Here is the link MySql Migration Toolkit


0

The GPS latitude and longitude for exif data are "rational" data type, or two 32-bit integers. To represent 34.46, for example, you could use the two 32-bit integers 3,446 (numerator) and 100 (denominator), or 344,600 and 10,000. For the integer value of degrees, for example you could use 8 with a denominator of 1. You can get the exif specification here. ...


5

According to this specification, longitude and latitude are encoded as a PropertyTagTypeRational Specifies that the value data member is an array of pairs of unsigned long integers. Each pair represents a fraction; the first integer is the numerator and the second integer is the denominator. The encoded layout should be (24 bytes total) Byte ...


1

There are a number of issues here. Firstly, your conversion methods are named wrong because the celsiusToFahrenheit actually tries to convert fahrenheit to celcius and vice versa. Secondly, the conversion formula for fahrenheit to celsius (which is actually inside your celsiusToFahrenheit() method) should be as shown below. Notice, the parentheses () to ...


1

Don't use static variables for Celsius and Fahrenheit. Doing so in this case is just asking for exactly the trouble that you found. Instead use local variables within the static methods. Just remove the static variables from the class and you'll see what to do next. BTW I think it's nicer to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit by ((C+40)*9/5.0 - 40). In other ...


1

Your are passing celsius as a parameter but using fahrenheit in the method. public static double celsiusToFahrenheit(double celsius){ return 9.0/5.0 * celsius + 32; } public static double celsiusToFahrenheit(double fahrenheit){ return 5.0/9.0 * (fahrenheit - 32); }


1

I believe your return statement in fahrenheitToCelsius should be return (5.0 * (fahrenheit - 32)) / 9;


2

I'd approach this in a different fashion than the one suggested by Paul. First, create a table storing the properties of devices: local tProperty = { "ready", "paused", "emergency", "started", "busy", "reserved1", "reserved2", "reserved3", "reserved4", "delay1", "delay2", "armoff", "shieldoff", ...


2

tonumber(s, 16) will convert hex representation to decimal and string.char will return a symbol/byte representation of a number. Check this recent SO answer for an example of how they can be used; the solution in the answer may work for you.


0

Idea is to start parsing the string from left to right and when you come across a '?' you go deeper in the tree else just return the new node created. Here is my recursive solution : struct node{ char val; node *left; node *right; node(char v):val(v),left(NULL),right(NULL){ } }; node* create_tree(string input, int &current){ ...


2

This one would be without using parent node. But using stack. public NodeC convertTtoBT (char[] values) { char xx = values[0]; NodeC n = new NodeC(xx); Stack<NodeC> a = new Stack<NodeC>(); for (int i = 1; i < values.length; i += 2) { if (values[i] == '?') { n.left = new NodeC (values[i + 1]); ...


0

I realise I'm late to the party, but I wanted a solution for this that properly handled digit grouping as well as different decimal separators for currencies. As none of these fully covered my use case I wrote my own solution which may be useful to others: function parsePotentiallyGroupedFloat(stringValue) { stringValue = stringValue.trim(); var ...


0

The right way would be to use pint or a similar library for units: import pint ureg = pint.UnitRegistry() my_size = 1.74*ureg.meter print(my_size) # 1.74 meter print(my_size.to(ureg.inch)) # 68.503937007874 inch The advantage is that the variables themselves have the information about which unit was used. This continues even if you divide: import pint ...


2

You can use a dictionary to lookup for a specified unit: amount, unit = input('Enter amount with units: ').split()[:2] converted_data = int(amount) * {'in': 2.54, 'cm': 0.39}[unit]


2

You can use input() method (wrapped in float() method to convert data to integer m_inch = float(input("Enter the amount in inches: ")) # will collection user data in inches m_cm = m_inch*2.54 # converts from inches to cm # rest of your code N.B. I have used float type for input, but you could use int() to wrap as well....Does this help?



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