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0

I will recomend momentjs lib to parse, validate, manipulate, and display dates in JavaScript. var firstDate = moment("30/12/2014", "DD/MM/YYYY") var today = moment(); // Format to Unix Timestamp to compare if(today.format('X') > firstDate.format('X')){ //send reminder to A }else{ // send reminder to B } Here is the link http://momentjs.com/


0

The best way to compare two date is to instanciate them with same object, here you must use Date object. function mainFunc(){ var firstDate = new Date( dueDate = "30/12/2014" ); today = new Date(); if( today > firstDate ){ //... } else{ //... } }


3

You can simplify your code. To get a date from dd/mm/yyyy, simply splitting on /, reversing the result and joining it on '/' gives you yyyy/mm/dd, which is valid input for a new Date to compare to some other Date. See snippet var report = document.querySelector('#result'); report.innerHTML += '30/12/2014 => '+ mainFunc('30/12/2014'); ...


0

Just return it in milliseconds format function convertToDate(dateString) { var dateData = dateString.split("/"); return +new Date(new Date().setFullYear(dateData[0], dateData[1] - 1, dateData[2])); } And also change var today = new Date(); to var today = +new Date();. Now it should work. + here converts Date object to milliseconds.


0

There could be some space with the value. Try trimming the string before conversion. Serialreadbuffer.trim()


2

trim the String before you parse it insetad of int numberbuffer = Integer.parseInt(serialreadbuffer) * 60 / 6144; do int numberbuffer = Integer.parseInt(serialreadbuffer.trim()) * 60 / 6144; you might have unprintable characters e.g. \r in it.


0

I have a fixation with unions{}, I can't help it. This might help: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdint.h> #include <string.h> #include <arpa/inet.h> uint32_t convert_int(char bytes[4]) { union {uint32_t n; char bytes[4];} box; memcpy(&box.bytes[0], bytes, sizeof(*bytes)); return ...


1

You can convert each byte to an 8-bit unsigned number, and you can combine these numbers to one 32-bit number using bit operations: uint32_t result = 0; for (int i = 12; i < 16; i++) { result <<= 8; result |= (uint8_t)bytes[i]; }


0

Well first you should know in which order the bytes are in your buffer, e.g., little or big endian. Here is how you would create unsigned 32 bit integer in case the bytes are laid out in little endian format in that buffer: uint32_t number = buf[12] | buf[13] << 8 | buf[14] << 16 | buf[15] << 24 ;


0

The simplest thing I can think of would be to write a to_string yourself: #include <sstream> std::string to_string(int i) { std::ostringstream os; os << i; return os.str(); } Then call it as others have suggested.


1

int this case may be better : #define STRING_DEFINE1(x) #x #define STRING_DEFINE(x) STRING_DEFINE1(x) ... CRuntime_error_line(msg,__FILE__,STRING_DEFINE(__LINE__))


2

As is suggested by Borgleader std::to_string is your solution. It will also construct a temporary std::string for you, so there's no need to construct a temporary string from msg: #pragma once #include <stdexcept> #include <cstring> #include <string> // Add this to support std::to_string class CRuntime_error_line: public ...


0

You're trying to extract the first 12 bits of a series of integers and also the last 12. These are 2 distinct problems. The latter is the easiest. First, let's start by using numpy's convenience methods to read in the data from the text file, rather than concocting our own (more likely less optimal) functions: a = np.fromfile(file, dtype=np.uint32, sep=' ...


0

I think you can import this data to SQL database and then it is very easy to sum, filter etc. But in Python we have dictionaries. You can read data and fill dictionary where key name is name of the state. Then for each line you add town to list of towns in this state, and add numbers to already saved numbers. Of course for 1st town in state you must create ...


0

I think I have figured it out: select * from (select asciistr(convert('test string goes here', 'UTF8')) as str from dual) where regexp_like(str, '.*\\([1-9A-F]|0[1-9A-F]).*'); Using http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin-1_Supplement_%28Unicode_block%29 as a reference, the LATIN-1 block of unicode ends at \00FF. For example, SQL> select * from (select ...


1

You didn't bother to mention an Oracle version. Up to 11.2, you should use the Oracle provided character set scanner (CSSCAN) for this purpose. Starting with 12.1, there's new utility called Oracle Database Migration Assistant for Unicode.


1

This is just a warning, not an error. A simple web search found: https://www.biostars.org/p/122005/


0

static void print_buf(const char *title, const unsigned char *buf, size_t buf_len) { size_t i = 0; fprintf(stdout, "%s\n", title); for(i = 0; i < buf_len; ++i) fprintf(stdout, "%02X%s", buf[i], ( i + 1 ) % 16 == 0 ? "\r\n" : " " ); }


0

Don't use isalpha to screen the output. EAFP -- convert it and handle that exception. Either the ValueError is exactly what you want, in that you can handle it and tell the user to correct their input. Or for some odd reason you want to silently correct their input from "4.3" to "4". def validateInput(): while True: global userGuess ...


0

First, why do you want to convert the float string to an integer? Do you want to treat 4.7 as meaning the user has guessed 4? Or 5? Or a legal but automatically-invalid guess? Or as actually the value 4.7 (in which case you don't want integers at all)? Or…? Second, the way you're approaching this is wrong. userGuess.isalpha() only tells you that the guess ...


2

Actually int() function expects an integer string or a float, but not a float string. If a float string is given you need to convert it to float first then to int as: int(float(userGuess))


1

You could try the new stri_list2matrix function in the stringi package. library(stringi) stri_list2matrix(lapply(data, unlist), byrow=TRUE, fill="") # [,1] [,2] [,3] # [1,] "A, B" "F" "" # [2,] "C" "M" "RIP" Or for NA instead of "", leave out the fill argument stri_list2matrix(lapply(data, unlist), byrow=TRUE) # [,1] [,2] [,3] # ...



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