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0

The right way would be to use pint or a similar library for units: import pint ureg = pint.UnitRegistry() my_size = 1.74*ureg.meter print(my_size) # 1.74 meter print(my_size.to(ureg.inch)) # 68.503937007874 inch The advantage is that the variables themselves have the information about which unit was used. This continues even if you divide: import pint ...


2

You can use a dictionary to lookup for a specified unit: amount, unit = input('Enter amount with units: ').split()[:2] converted_data = int(amount) * {'in': 2.54, 'cm': 0.39}[unit]


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You can use input() method (wrapped in float() method to convert data to integer m_inch = float(input("Enter the amount in inches: ")) # will collection user data in inches m_cm = m_inch*2.54 # converts from inches to cm # rest of your code N.B. I have used float type for input, but you could use int() to wrap as well....Does this help?


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I know it's not exactely the right solution of your problem but it can "do the job". You could convert from tif to jpg by adding a PNG (which is lossless) converting step: tif→PNG→jpg inkscape --export-png=img.png img.tif then convert img.png img.jpg For me, the command convert -list configure | grep DELEGATES returns: DELEGATES bzlib djvu ...


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First you need to know what the representation 0xh.hhhh p±d, mean? Let's understand it by taking an example of hexadecimal constant 0x1.99999ap+1. The digit 1 before the decimal point is a hex digit and the number of hexadecimal digits after it (99999a) is equal to the precision. 0x is the hex introducer and the p is exponent field. The exponent is a decimal ...


2

This is an easy question to answer. The obvious explanation is that (1 + 9.0/16 + 9.0/(16*16) + 9.0/(16*16*16) + 9.0/(16*16*16*16) + ...)*2 = 3.2 You can easily verify this by taking the five first terms and write this to a Python interpreter: (1 + 9.0/16 + 9.0/(16*16) + 9.0/(16*16*16) + 9.0/(16*16*16*16))*2 The answer is 3.199981689453125. Why the 2 at ...


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You can use replace with func param like 'Macy's'.replace(/&#(.+?);/g,function(_, $1){ return '%'+(+$1).toString(16); //create the new substring (to put in place of the substring received from parameter #1) }); //"Macy%27s"


1

Your formula (in your question title) just has the wrong precedence. It's not (An x 2)^n…(A0 x 2)^0, but rather An x (2^n)…A0 x (2^0). Binary = 1110 n = 3210 calc = 1*2^3 = 1*8 = 8 1*2^2 = 1*4 = 4 1*2^1 = 1*2 = 2 0*2^0 = 0*1 = 0 = 14 Binary = 1111 n = 3210 calc = 1*2^3 = 1*8 = 8 1*2^2 = 1*4 = 4 1*2^1 = ...


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I think your confusion lies in your formula being incorrect, it is not (An*2)^n it is An*(2^n) (PEMDAS): 1110 1 * 2^3 = 8 1 * 2^2 = 4 1 * 2^1 = 2 0 * 2^0 = 0 --- 14 1111 1 * 2^3 = 8 1 * 2^2 = 4 1 * 2^1 = 2 1 * 2^0 = 1 --- 15


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DECLARE @t AS TABLE (a NVARCHAR(10)); INSERT INTO @t VALUES ('0000100001'),('0002507630'),('0090078607'),('0258736000'); SELECT a,CAST(CAST(a AS INT)/1000.000 AS DECIMAL(10,3)) FROM @t;


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Try this: SELECT CAST (LEFT(col1, 7) + '.' + RIGHT(col1,3) AS DECIMAL(10,3)) SQL Fiddle demo


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Unfortunately you haven't provided the full context configuration however could you check this block: <annotation-driven /> I suspect it's missing a proper namespace (mvc: ?) and thus the default conversions are not loaded.


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Would not be appreciated by your teacher, but one might try: = hyperlink("https://www.google.com/search?q="&A2&B2&C2)


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Thanks for responding so quickly. I ended up figuring it out. I did it for the case of millimeters and centimeters for now. I used the following function: =IF(AND(B2="millimeter",C2="centimeter")=TRUE, A2/10, IF(AND(B2="centimeter",C2="millimeter")=TRUE, A2*10, IF((B2=C2),"VALUES ARE IDENTICAL...","UNITS NOT RECOGNIZED")))


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If you don't want to code, and want to do it online manually, you can try http://pgl.yoyo.org/urlex/ Just enter the text or upload the file. Choose Plain list as your output and extract. It will extract all URLs for you.


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You could also try library(car) recode(OriginalColumn, '1:3=1; c(4,8)=2; 5:7=3; else=NA') #[1] 2 NA 1 NA 2 1 1 3 3 3


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You can do this using positional indexing: > c(1,1,1,2,3,3,3,2,NA,NA)[OriginalColumn] [1] 2 NA 1 NA 2 1 1 3 3 3 It is better than repeated/nested ifelse because it is vectorized (thus easier to read, write, and understand; and probably faster). In essence, you're creating a new vector that contains that new values for every value you want to ...


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Nested ifelse might be better than "bunch of crazy for loops" f <- function(x){ ifelse(x %in% 1:3, 1, ifelse(x %in% c(4,8), 2, ifelse(x %in% 5:7, 3, NA))) } f(OriginalColumn) #[1] 2 NA 1 NA 2 1 1 3 3 3


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say your time is in cell A1, place this formula in B1 =IF(LEN(A1)>5,VALUE(TEXT(A1,"[ss].00")),A1) If the time is less than a minute it outputs the time unaltered, greater than 1 minute it converts it to seconds & milliseconds (2 decimal places). This will only work if your time in A1 is 10 seconds or greater.


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Since the characters 'A' thru 'F' do not immediately follow '9', you have to adjust for that. ; as you have it pop dx add dl, 30h cmp dl, '9' jbe skip add dl, 7 ; bump up to 'A' - 'F' skip: ; print it... as you were


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You can use the CAST function to cast your STRING to a BIGINT, like so: SELECT CAST('00321' AS BIGINT) FROM table; As a BIGINT it will show on the screen and in delimited text files as 321.


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Your question about converting into int values suggests that you are going to display the points in a pixel display, here indeed scaling them first with a double then floor (or ceil or round) the values. Also a simple cast will do the conversion: int pi.x = (int)pd.x; Or, much simpler, the assignment itself. int pi.x = pd.x; The best solution would be ...



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