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Your input is in json format. Consider my code is sample. private static ArrayList<String> array_1 = new ArrayList<String>();; String json = [{"GroupPosition":0,"ChildPosition":0},{"GroupPosition":0,"ChildPosition":1},{"GroupPosition":1,"ChildPosition":0}]; JSONArray leagues = new JSONArray(json); for (int i = 0; i < leagues.length(); i++) { ...


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First you have to parse your format into date object using formatter specified Integer value = 19000101; SimpleDateFormat originalFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd"); Date date = originalFormat.parse(value.toString()); Remember that Date has no format. It just represents specific instance in time in milliseconds starting from 1970-01-01. But if you ...


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It seems to me that you don't really have a number representing your date, you have a string of three numbers: year, month, and day. You can extract those values with some simple arithmetic. Integer value = 19000101; int year = value / 10000; int month = (value % 10000) / 100; int day = value % 100; Date date = new GregorianCalendar(year, month, ...


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Try this: String myDate= new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss") .format(new Date(19000101 * 1000L)); Assuming it is the time since 1/1/1970 EDIT:- If you want to convert from YYYYMMDD to YYYY-MM-DD format Date dt = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd", Locale.ENGLISH).parse(String.ValueOf(19000101));


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Basically, there's no byte array which would be encoded to 10==. If a base64 string ends with ==, that means that the final 4 characters only represent a single byte. So only the first character and the first 2 bits of the second character are relevant. Looking at the Wikipedia table, 10 means values of: '1' = 53 '0' = 52 110101 110100 So that's ...


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The final solution was to use imap_binary($decryptedText) to convert back. Edit : It has since been brought to my attention that a better way of doing this would be to replace 2 things C# plainBytes = Convert.FromBase64String(data); Changed to plainBytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(data); and PHP imap_binary($decryptedText) Changed to ...


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I guess you are trying to integrate this with an existing system. However, if you just want to convert a couple of files to CSV, you can use this: json to csv online converter


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uint8_t is 8 bits of memory, and can store values from 0 to 255 char is probably 8 bits of memory char * is probably 32 or 64 bits of memory containing the address of a different place in memory in which there is a char First, make sure you don't try to put the memory address (the char *) into the uint8 - put what it points to in: char from; char * pfrom ...


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More safe example in C++ way char* bufferSlidePressure = "123"; std::string buffer(bufferSlidePressure); std::stringstream stream; stream << str; int n = 0; // convert to int if (!(stream >> n)){ //could not convert } Also, if boost is availabe int n = boost::lexical_cast<int>( str )


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char * is a pointer, not a single character. It is possible that it points to the character you want. uint8_t is unsigned but on most systems will be the same size as a char and you can simply cast the value. You may need to manage the memory and lifetime of what your function returns. This could be done with vector< unsigned char> as the return type ...


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Is your string a number? E.g. char* bufferSlidePressure = "123";? If so, I would simply do: uint8_t slidePressure = (uint8_t)atoi(bufferSlidePressure); Or, if you need to put it in an array: slidePressure[0] = (uint8_t)atoi(bufferSlidePressure); Edit: Following your comment, if your data could be anything, I guess you would have to copy it into the ...


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a simple solution: convert each byte to hex string (ostringstream or even sprintf can help), you got 2 digits, range is 0 to F. for each hex digit you can create the bitmap like this: 0 = 0000, 1 = 0001, 2 = 0010, ..., F = 1111, add bits to the vector according to the bitmap to recover - you take 4 bits and translate it back to digit, then take 2 digits ...


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DateTime unixEpoch = DateTime.ParseExact("1970-01-01", "yyyy-MM-dd", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); DateTime convertedTime = unixEpoch.AddMilliseconds(unixTimeInMillisconds); Of course, one can make unixEpoch a global static, so it only needs to appear once in your project, and one can use AddSeconds if the UNIX time is in seconds. To ...


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For the first plot, I recommend axisartist. The automatic scaling of the two y-axis on the left-hand-side is achieved through a simple scaling factor that applies to the specified y-limits. This first example is based on the explanations on parasite axes: import numpy as np from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import host_subplot import mpl_toolkits.axisartist as ...


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We can use modulo and the length of the input. The last character will be used to calculate the exact "position", and the remainders to count how many "laps" we did in the alphabet, e.g. def column_to_integer(column_name) alpha = /[A-Z]+/.match(column_name).to_a.first laps = (alpha.length - 1) * 26 position = ((alpha.last.ord - 'A'.ord) % ...


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You'll need C++11, but it's definitely possible: template<typename V> void PrintVector(V const& v) { for (auto elem : v) std::cout << elem << " "; std::cout << std::endl; } template <typename V, typename ... Vectors> void PrintAll(V const& v1, Vectors... vtail) { PrintVector(v); PrintAll(vtail...); } ...


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If you're simply convering a string into a vector<int> then this example may give you an idea how to do it in general. #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main() { string str = "1234567890"; vector<int> intedStr; for (size_t i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) { ...


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To solve your literal problem of looking up a variable by a string representing the variable's name: The only facility that POSIX supplies to look up a global variable by name is dlsym(). It only works for globals, and you have to declare your functions with extern "C" to suppress C++ name mangling (global variable names don't get mangled). #include ...


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(This is more a comment than an answer, but am listing a bit of code too long for a comment...) If you don't want to clean up the code to only have a vector<vector<int>> + vector<vector<string>>, vector<vector<boost::variant<int,string>>>, or similar, then you could create e.g. vector<vector<int>*> and ...


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You need something to iterate on if you need something that is resolved in runtime, you could use a vector of vectors but they should be of the same type (vector of strings mixed with int is not be possible since they are different types due to the template instantation ) On the other hand you can use the preprocessor and macro expansion for static stuff or ...


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Not sure if this is any clearer than the code you already have, but it does have the advantage of handling an arbitrary number of letters: class String def upcase_letters self.upcase.split(//) end end module Enumerable def reverse_with_index self.map.with_index.to_a.reverse end def sum self.reduce(0, :+) end end def ...


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The .head() member function returns the first n elements of a vector. If n is a compile-time constant, then you can use the templated variant (as in the code example below) and the Eigen library will automatically unroll the loop. Eigen::Vector4f vec4; // initialize vec4 Eigen::Vector3f vec3 = vec4.head<3>(); In the Eigen documentation, see Block ...


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Yeah, because you know the size is static (3 elements) you should unroll the loop and copy them explicitly. This optimization might be performed by the compiler already, but it can't hurt to do it yourself just in case.


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You can use HtmlAgilityPack's HtmlToText demo, which can be found here. I had a look at the other answers but they all suggest various solutions involving regular expressions. I thought that HtmlAgilityPack didn't get enough attention. All you need to do is plug the NuGet package in your project and follow the example.



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