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16

I'm not sure I understand 100% what the objective is, but if you're looking to fit the measured points to the reference curve then using dtw seems sensible. Fitting the 10 measured points to the 370-odd curve points does give a slightly strange result (which is just the optimization with the symmetric step.pattern). I think that's largely a function of the ...


15

If you call leastsq like this: import scipy.optimize p,cov,infodict,mesg,ier = optimize.leastsq( residuals,a_guess,args=(x,y),full_output=True,warning=True) where def residuals(a,x,y): return y-f(x,a) then, using the definition of R^2 given here, ss_err=(infodict['fvec']**2).sum() ss_tot=((y-y.mean())**2).sum() rsquared=1-(ss_err/ss_tot) ...


13

Numerical algorithms tend to work better when not fed extremely small (or large) numbers. In this case, the graph shows your data has extremely small x and y values. If you scale them, the fit is remarkable better: xData = np.load('xData.npy')*10**5 yData = np.load('yData.npy')*10**5 from __future__ import division import os ...


11

Unfortunately, np.polynomial.polynomial.polyfit returns the coefficients in the opposite order of that for np.polyfit and np.polyval (or, as you used np.poly1d). To illustrate: In [40]: np.polynomial.polynomial.polyfit(x, y, 4) Out[40]: array([ 84.29340848, -100.53595376, 44.83281408, -8.85931101, 0.65459882]) In [41]: np.polyfit(x, y, 4) ...


11

Getting the correct errors in the fit parameters can be subtle in most cases. In general, you have data points and an associated uncertainty with each data point. For most measurements the uncertainty in each data point is a systematic uncertainty of the measuring device or procedure and so it is the same for all points (EQUAL ERRORS). However, in ...


9

A (slight) improvement to this solution, not accounting for a priori knowledge of the data might be the following: Take the inverse-mean of the data set and use that as the "scale factor" to be passed to the underlying leastsq() called by curve_fit(). This allows the fitter to work and returns the parameters on the original scale of the data. The relevant ...


7

Firstly try not to increase maxfev so large, this is usually a sign something else is going wrong! Playing around I can get a fit by the following addition: def f(x, b, a, k): return (b/(np.sqrt(1 + a*((k-x)**2)))) popt, pcov = curve_fit(f, x, y, p0=[20, 600.0, 35.0]) Firstly give the fitting function you have given has a maximum of 1, since the peak ...


6

The output of twoD_Gaussian needs to be 1D. What you can do is add a .ravel() onto the end of the last line, like this: def twoD_Gaussian((x, y), amplitude, xo, yo, sigma_x, sigma_y, theta, offset): xo = float(xo) yo = float(yo) a = (np.cos(theta)**2)/(2*sigma_x**2) + (np.sin(theta)**2)/(2*sigma_y**2) b = ...


5

A quick google search hints at a problem with the data being single precision (your other programs almost certainly upcast to double precision too, though this explicitely is a problem with scipy as well, see also this bug report). If you look at your full_output=1 result, you see the the Jacobian is approximated as zero everywhere. So giving the Jacobian ...


4

I don't think FFT is good for a fine-resolution frequency measurement for (quasi)periodic signals - see below. Every discrete FFT has spreading on non-integer bin frequencies (that is on any frequency which does not exactly correspond to one of the frequency steps of the particular FFT); these "intermediate" frequencies will be smeared/spread out around the ...


4

As mentioned by others, you are misinterpreting the frequency of the signal. Let me give an example to clear a few things: Fs = 200; %# sampling rate t = 0:1/Fs:1-1/Fs; %# time vector of 1 second f = 6; %# frequency of signal x = 0.44*sin(2*pi*f*t); %# sine wave N = length(x); ...


4

Fitting a Gaussian: # your data set.seed(0) data <- c(rnorm(100,0,1), 10, 11) # find & remove outliers outliers <- boxplot(data)$out data <- setdiff(data, outliers) # fitting a Gaussian mu <- mean(data) sigma <- sd(data) # testing the fit, check the p-value reference.data <- rnorm(length(data), mu, sigma) ks.test(reference.data, ...


4

Found your question while trying to answer my own similar question. Short answer. The cov_x that leastsq outputs should be multiplied by the residual variance. i.e. s_sq = (func(popt, args)**2).sum()/(len(ydata)-len(p0)) pcov = pcov * s_sq as in curve_fit.py. This is because leastsq outputs the fractional covariance matrix. My big problem was that ...


4

What toolboxes are available to you? The easiest way would probably be the cftool. (Type it into your command window) if you have the curve fitting toolbox. But polyfit should do as well. The main problem I see: Your coefficients are not independent of one another. Because log(2/x) is equal to log(2) - log(x) your equation becomes: y = ao + a1*log(x) + ...


4

It seems like this is a problem with your initial guess, in particular the frequency you chose is too far off. At your current initial guess p0, curve_fit will not converge fast enough on a good answer, so you need to choose a better p0. Here's an example of what I mean: t = np.linspace(0,50,1000) data = 0.275 * (np.random.rand(len(t)) * 0.2 + 1.) * ...


4

Your data does not appear to be gamma-distributed, but assuming it is, you could fit it like this: import numpy as np import scipy.stats as stats import matplotlib.pyplot as plt gamma = stats.gamma a, loc, scale = 3, 0, 2 size = 20000 y = gamma.rvs(a, loc, scale, size=size) x = np.linspace(0, y.max(), 100) # fit param = gamma.fit(y, floc=0) pdf_fitted = ...


3

Two things: Gnuplot does integer division, so you must use 3/2.0 to get the correct exponent. Second, the function in gnuplot is not the same as the one used in KaleidaGraph: The exponent must be positive (3/2.0) and you must use m2 where you have b: f(x) = 1/(2*pi) * 1/m1 * 1/(m2 + x**2)**(3/2.0) m1 = 150 m2 = 17 fit f(x) "data.txt" using 1:2 via m1,m2 ...


3

Everything works and the algorithm found a local minimum, as it is supposed to do. Your initial guess of the frequency is just far of from reality. Good fitting does not only rely on the right model, but also on good starting values. Expecially for periodic curves, higher harmonics can form a local minimum. Thats why fitting is never a blackbox like data ...


3

Without seeing your data it is hard to tell what is going wrong. I generated some random noise and used your code to perform a fit to it. Everything works okay. This algorithm does not allow for parameter boundaries so you may run into problems if your p0 is close to zero. I did the following: import numpy as np from scipy.optimize import leastsq import ...


3

The syntax plot [xmin:xmax] f(x) (the same as for fit) restricts the plot to a certain range. So, you could do something like plot "Daten.txt" u 1:2 w l, [800:1200] f(x) t title_f(a,b), [1100:] g(x) t title_g(c,d)


3

As far as I know, that function is not present in any of the Octave packages. However, the best place to look for something similar would be the optim package, probably the function nonlin_curvefit. Looking at the documentation, the model fourier8 is of the type Y = a0+a1*cos(x*p)+b1*sin(x*p)... +a8*cos(8*x*p)+b8*sin(8*x*p).


3

To fix loc, use the argument floc: print st.expon.fit(xx, floc=0) E.g. In [33]: import scipy.stats as st In [34]: xx = st.expon.rvs(size=100) In [35]: print st.expon.fit(xx, floc=0) (0, 0.77853895325584932) Some related questions: Gamma distribution fit error Why does the Gamma distribution in SciPy have three parameters? Fitting non-normpdf's ...


3

Fitting a Gaussian curve to the data, the principle is to minimise the sum of squares difference between the fitted curve and the data, so we define f our objective function and run optim on it: fitG = function(x,y,mu,sig,scale){ f = function(p){ d = p[3]*dnorm(x,mean=p[1],sd=p[2]) sum((d-y)^2) } optim(c(mu,sig,scale),f) } Now, extend ...


3

numpy.linalg.lstsq solves this for you. Object-oriented wrappers for that function, as well as more advanced regression models, are available in both scikit-learn and StatsModels. (Disclaimer: I'm a scikit-learn developer, so this is not the most unbiased advice ever.)


3

Soooo, I found the answer to my own question. Cornell has released a piece of software for doing exactly this kind of blind fitting called Eureqa. It has to be one of the most polished pieces of software that I've ever seen come out of an academic lab. It's seriously pretty nifty. Check it out: It's even got turnkey integration with Amazon's ec2 clusters, ...


3

Put in some known data you can check by hand, e.g. {1,1}, {2,2}, {3,3}. Are the averages correct? If so move on to the sums, etc. The error will reveal itself. On the code itself you can make it clearer, and incidentally more efficient, by dropping the calls to @"avg.doubleValue" and producing all your sums in a single loop: // Sum of X, Y, X^2, Y^2 & ...


2

It helps to actually read the content of the function, which uses Singular Value Decomposition. % calculate centroid x0 = mean(X)'; % form matrix A of translated points A = [(X(:, 1) - x0(1)) (X(:, 2) - x0(2)) (X(:, 3) - x0(3))]; % calculate the SVD of A [U, S, V] = svd(A, 0); % find the largest singular value in S and extract from V the % ...


2

The following worked for me: import pylab as pp import numpy as np from scipy import integrate, interpolate from scipy import optimize ##initialize the data x_data = np.linspace(0,9,10) y_data = np.array([0.000,0.416,0.489,0.595,0.506,0.493,0.458,0.394,0.335,0.309]) def f(y, t, k): """define the ODE system in terms of dependent variable y, ...



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