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Here is a sketch (pseudocode, not real code) of the EM algorithm. You don't need the histogram at all. function M_step (x, responsibility, j) bump_mean[j] = sum (x[j]*responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) where n = length(x) bump_mean_x2[j] = sum (x[j]**2 * responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) bump_variance[j] = bump_mean_x2[j] - bump_mean[j]**2 ...


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With the help of user3235916 I have managed to write down following piece of code: import numpy as np measuredData = np.array(yvalues['int1']) calibrationData = np.array(yvalues['int0']) A = np.vstack( [measuredData, np.ones(len(measuredData))]).T gain,offset = np.linalg.lstsq(A, calibrationData)[0] Then I could use following transformation to get the ...


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If you are happy with a solution of the form measuredData = calibration data*gain + offset finding a solution in simply a linear regression problem. This is probably best solved using the normal equation, which will give you a fit that minimises the sum of squares error, which is what I think you are after. Concretely, in python I guess the solution ...


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If the two signals are supposed to be the same shape, just y-shifted and y-scaled, you should find that gain = std_dev(measured) / std_dev(calibration) offset = average(calibration - (measured / gain))


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If your OS is Linux, you can use paste command to combine data.dat and bgr.dat into a new data file (new_data.dat). The new_data.dat should have four columns, then in gnuplot: fit f(x) `new_data.dat` using 1:($2-const*$4) via par1,par2,...,parN, const which subtracts the background multiplied by const on the fly.



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