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9

If you want the answer to be very simple you need to accept some oversimplification, if you're willing to live with that, here it goes: Data is transmitted over imperfect links - errors may occur on the way. Imagine you want to make sure the received information is the same as the transmitted one without wasting too much bandwidth, how would you do that? ...


6

Cyclic Redundancy Checks (CRCs) are popular specifically because of their efficiency at detecting multiple bit errors with a guaranteed accuracy. There are different designs to generate CRC polynomials where the trade-off is accuracy vs. computational complexity. In your case, you can choose the "fastest" one that meets your requirements for accuracy. You ...


5

Transport layer data could be broken down to many data-link layer frames/packets. So it is possible that even without any data-link errors the transport layer stream/packet may be corrupt. Edit: This is because a transport layer path is usually composed of many data-link layer hops, for example: Host1 <----> switch1 <----> switch2 <----> ...


4

I'm not sure if IPTables can do the kind of packet payload modification that I want to do. The article linked in the 1st answer allows modification only at network layer, not at link layer. Solution: WinpkFilter


4

Consider: 0111011110111110*0111110*10 After it finds a 0 and then five consecutive 1 bits it stuffs with a 0. This assumes 0 bit stuffing which is common.


3

For Windows, have a look at WinPcap which provides low-level network access. The developer pack already contains some simple examples to get you started. BTW, on Linux there are packet sockets.


3

You could use the eEx Network Library to write small apps (I have done the same thing during my CCNA). It is an easy-to-use and object-oriented .Net programming library, which lets you go down to layer 2 and send out custom frames via WinPcap. Frame types like Ethernet, ARP, IP, UDP, TCP and RIP are implemented, and as far as I know, these are protocols ...


3

It seems that there is no way supported by Android SDK API to do that. Such APIs show just functionalities over level 3, IP. Thus, it seems to me you cannot access to level 2 in a transparent way. Actually, I didn't have a look at Android NDK, but I will


2

Did you tried looking at PCAP libraries? It provides nice filtering functions on IP, port and other things.


2

I am going to break my answer into points: 1.Lan is not necessary to connect to internet. You can have cable internet or internet through DSL connection etc. in which though the wire that comes and connect to your pc is the same cat5(for example) cable, there is no lan involved. 2.Internet through wireless router an be accessed in two ways: (a)The ...


2

Short answer is: most likely In your case, you only know your direct connectivity is made possible thru WiFi. From your perspective, it's just a WiFi network. But behind WiFi network, it could be Ethernet, DSL, Cable, etc. And behind those, it could be T1, frame relay, ATM, 10G or maybe 100G Ethernet, etc. For example, I can have a small LAN at my home ...


2

In the frame work of the TCP/IP (Internet Protocol Suite) model, OSI's data link layer, in addition to other components, is contained in TCP/IP's lowest layer, the link layer. The Internet Protocol's link layer only concerns itself with hardware issues to the point of obtaining hardware addresses for locating hosts on a physical network link and transmitting ...


2

You are correct: placing the CRC at the end of a frame reduces packet latency and reduces hardware buffering requirements. On the transmit side, hardware can read and transmit bytes of the frame immediately. The transmitter calculates the CRC on the fly as data passes through, then simply appends the CRC the tail of the frame. Consider the alternative ...


2

The most common design patterns to develop communication protocols are the Protocol Stack Design Pattern and the Protocol Layer Design Pattern. Take a look at it. The links have some example code. In summary it works as following: Communication Upper Layer to Lower Layer: use function parameters Communication Lower Layer to Upper Layer: use callback ...


1

Okay after doing some more researching, it really is the case that the maximum size of an IP packet is determined by the maximum transmission unit (MTU) of the data-link. For those who care, this website breaks it down pretty well: http://aa.net.uk/kb-broadband-mtu.html


1

This is because Data link layer deals exclusively with bit-level error correction. It takes a packet the receiving computer already has in its possession and determines if an error occurred in transmission and whether the data is intact or corrupt. However, there need to be additional controls in place to make sure the system knows that all the packets are ...


1

There are many reasons to not address ports of switch by MAC. MAC number is stored in hardware (read-only memory card). If each port address by its own MAC, it also has own ROM card => more money on hardware More complicated when you config MAC address table of switch manually. Exhaust MAC address resource faster, then you have to register another OUI ...


1

Here is the code snippet I was looking for: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <sys/socket.h> #include <linux/if_packet.h> #include <linux/if_ether.h> #include <linux/if_arp.h> int main() { int s = socket(AF_PACKET, SOCK_RAW, htons(ETH_P_ALL)); if (s == -1) { ...


1

Layer 3 and above are located in the "Payload" part of an ethernet header. As you can see here the ARP packet also contains IP addresses from its sender and receiver:


1

Is there layer 3 encapsulation in use here? Yes it is! The two computers are connected in a network created by your router, which is a Network Layer Device. When the sender sends a packet it doesn't know where is the receiver (in LAN or in Internet), so it prepares to send the packet as usually. Then the router checks his table and knows that the receiver ...


1

by using tshark you can do it like that: example: tshark -i eth0 -e eth.src -Tfields


1

For framing in the network in the data link layer, there are some approaches that the bit-oriented is one of them. It should be a way to know the start and the end of a frame which is transmitting on the link in the receiver side, so there are some format for framing like HDLC. You can see this. In the many types of frame formats there are begging sequence ...


1

None of the above. The MAC adds its own address to Ethernet frames on the way out; the software doesn't have to add it. On occasion, though, it is useful for the driver to know the physical address of the chip it's driving; this doesn't require querying the NIC every time or "maintaining a file"; 6 bytes of RAM in the driver's data structure does the job ...


1

In fact the placement has very much to do with what CRC is about: polynomial division. If you move the CRC remainder to the front of the payload bitstream, you will invalidate some of the CRC properties, such as burst error detection. The key to understanding this is the fact, that a CRC is always operating on a stream of bits, not bytes, or a block of ...


1

Despite the different semantics of layering in TCP/IP and OSI, the link layer is often described as a combination of the data link layer and the physical layer in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocol stack. The link layer of the TCP/IP model is often compared directly with the combination of the data link layer and the physical layer in the Open ...


1

There isn't enough information in the question to answer it fully for "any" protocol, but Ethernet for example bit-stuffs frame content with a 0-bit after 5 consecutive 1-bits, which seems to be the case here. As for the rest of your question about the framing, a hint is to look at what is supposed to be passed from the data link layer to the network layer. ...


1

It really depends on the protocols rather than the layer, but assuming you mean TCP... TCP's error detection is minimal and designed more as an integrity check than any kind of reliable error detection. The reason you don't see this is practice is that data-link layers such as Ethernet, PPP, FrameRelay, etc. have much, much more robust error detection ...


1

Your connection to the nearest router is using a wifi data link protocol (in the IEEE 802.11 family). But the connections to other routers and (eventually) hosts will use other data link protocols, likely including ethernet at least at the far end.


1

The LLC sublayer is primarily concerned with: * Multiplexing protocols transmitted over the MAC layer (when transmitting) and demultiplexing them (when receiving). * Providing flow and error control The protocol used for LLC in IEEE 802 networks and in some non-IEEE 802 networks such as FDDI is specified by the IEEE 802.2 standard. Some non-IEEE 802 ...


1

CRC is covered in another question here When is CRC more appropriate to use than MD5/SHA1? It is suitable for detecting random errors and easy to implement.



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