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Assuming you have read the data in using readLines or scan and ended up with something like: x <- c("0101110", "1010000", "1010011", "0101010", "1000101") You can convert it to a matrix using something like: > t(sapply(strsplit(x, "", TRUE), as.numeric)) [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [1,] 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 [2,] 1 0 ...


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Schema.org is something like a vocabulary or ontology to annotate data and here specifically Web pages. It's a good idea to extract microdata from Web pages but is it really used by Web developper ? I don't think so and I think that the majority of microdata are used by company such as Google or Yahoo. Finally, you can find data but not a lot and mainly ...


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If I understand your problem, you'll want something like this: bottom <- seq(1750, 2010, 5) library(dplyr) new_df <- mlt.mx.info %>% arrange(Year) %>% mutate(year2 = as.numeric(substr(Year, 6, 9))) %>% mutate(new_year = paste0(bottom[findInterval(year2, bottom)], "-",(bottom[findInterval(year2, bottom) + 1] - 1))) View(new_df) So what ...


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We have had great success using only about 100-200 training samples (depending on the specific classification) to classify hundreds of thousands of paragraphs with a fairly high degree of accuracy. We did hand-filter the randomly selected samples to ensure they are not very similar to each other (and therefore represent different ways to express a concept). ...


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You have guessed right. This is the job of aggregation. But aggregations can be slow if your mapping is not right. For example if you do aggregation on a analyzed field like "text" which may contain lots of tokens it will lead to high memory usage and in turn hamper performance. Now coming to you requirement, you want the count of documents containing say ...


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Unless you really have exabytes of data, I recommend working with Lucene instead of ElasticSearch to reduce the overhead. There is no use in serializing data in JSON and sending it over the network when you could access it directly more efficiently... Unless you want to load 80000 documents, I suggest you send two more requests: "green socks" AND NOT ...


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Considering that you have a corpus, you can try using topic modeling technologies (such as Biterm) to help you inferring the most relevant terms to a given topic, being that your terms could also be n-grams. This would be a probabilistic approximation, since, as you mentioned, simply counting frequencies did not yield good results. Of course, this approach ...


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It counts the number of documents, ignoring duplicate occurences. Split e.g. into sentences or paragraphs.


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The reason is that you have only one document, so sparseness doesn't change as you change the threshold. Run these lines and you will see the effect: data("crude") tdm <- TermDocumentMatrix(crude) dtm <- DocumentTermMatrix(crude[1]) # pick only the first article (document, like your chapter) dim(dtm) (twenty <- removeSparseTerms(dtm, 0.2)) (forty ...


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First of all you should always evaluate your algorithms with cross validation. For that you split your data into training and validation sets, train your classifiers with the first group and use the latter to get an approximate error of your classifier. That said, usually you'll end up testing different classifiers and algorithms. There is no way to tell ...


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You can make a study on how difficult it may be, what can you do to help understand the problem better, improve it and suggest further studies. This is what typically is expected from a project like yours. I assume this will not be a regression problem, but a classification problem. I would study the prediction performance of chosen features such as ...


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There is not a lot in this data, unfortunately. Forget the 1 itemsets. Choose the most confident rule you have for prediction. Match n-1 items, predict the last. Effeftively there are three predictions in your data: 6 visits 9 next 8 stays at 8 9 stays a 9


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There's one important thing I should remember: I should include ALL the unwanted words in my stop list. This is somewhat difficult since there's always some variations available... For example, if I want to exclude method I add it to my list. However, the resulting vocabulary may also contain method since there are words like methodist, methods, etc. Then ...


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I can't say about your teacher, I just can propose for you some way how to make weather forecast better. As usually weather forecast is made by analysis of movement of clouds, winds, speed of movement and then forecast is calculated by human according to some algorithm. But if you want to make some predictions with neural network, you can use data at this ...


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You are right on with the process. Personally, I'd view your data as 2D just the (x,y) that are Sales and Fuel Cost... though you could use all 4 and just have 4D points instead. Step 1: Either pick random centers (3 of them c_1, c_2, c_3), or split up your data into 3 random clusters. If you randomly split the data into 3 clusters, you then compute the ...


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There is a reason why the famous APRIORI algorithm does not query the database once for each item set combination, but only scans it once per itemset length: this is already expensive enough. It doesn't help if you try to cram everything into one big SQL query. Your approach will not scale to any meaningful data set because of size. It will be much easier ...


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In order to run any GUI application, you need to install either X or a virtual framebuffer (e.g. Xvfb) into your box.


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If your distance function for non-numeric data is always like this: * identical values have zero distance between them and * different values have a unit distance. Cannot you just convert your non-numeric data to some numeric representation? For example, you have one non-numeric feature which contains 3 possible values, age20, age30, age40; you could ...


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You may have already read this, but the documentation says that the weights parameter is defined in this way: an optional vector of weights to be used in the fitting process. Must be positive but do not need to be normalized. If keep.data=FALSE in the initial call to gbm then it is the user’s responsibility to resupply the weights to gbm.more. ...


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Since you are willing to try any other tool that will do the clustering, I recommend taking a look at SPMF. SPMF is an open-source data mining mining library written in Java, specialized in pattern mining. It is distributed under the GPL v3 license. It offers implementations of 89 data mining algorithms for: sequential pattern mining, ...


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For kmeans you have to create equal length vectors. One possible way is - given there are three unique Ids cid1, cid2 and cid3 so you create a vector of length 3 each taking a binary value (0 or 1) denoting the absence or presence of that unique id. id => [cid1, cid2, cid3] i.e. above examples can be written as: id1,1,1,0 id2,0,0,1 id3,1,0,1 ... ...


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The accepted answer here by user "chl" has a reference to the Biometrics Literature: http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/3489/calculating-false-acceptance-rate-for-a-gaussian-distribution-of-scores . He says, [the ROC curve] is a plot of (TAR=1-FRR, the false rejection rate) against false acceptance rate (FAR). However, commonly the ROC ...


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Your figures suggest that density based clustering is what your human users wanted. E.g. DBSCAN.


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Elements of Statistical Learning book is useful to understand basic programming and skills. You can also download this books from http://statweb.stanford.edu/~tibs/ElemStatLearn/


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Do you really do data mining (as in: classification, clustering, anomaly detection), or is "data mining" for you any reporting on the data? In the latter case, all the "modern data mining tools" will disappoint you, because they serve a different purpose. Have you used the indexing functionality of Postgres well? Your scenario sounds as if selection and ...


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You do not need to classify after clustering. Your approach does not make sense to me, and your result most likely is incorrect. If you want to compute the average ages, compute them on the M/F subsets of your data. Do not assume your clusters agree to e.g. gender this will usually not work. If you know your desired clusters, don't use clustering but use ...


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There are a thousand ways to approach this issue but I think that the path of least resistance for you would be postgres replication. Check out this Postgres replication tutorial for a quick, proof-of-concept. (There are many hits when you Google for postgres replication and that link is just one of them.) Here is a link documenting streaming replication ...


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Using an itemset mining algorithm like Apriori as proposed in the other answer is not the best solution because Apriori does not consider time or the sequential ordering. Thus, it requires to do an additional pre-processing step to consider ordering. A better solution is to use a sequential pattern mining algorithm like PrefixSpan, SPADE, or CM-SPADE ...


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I am not sure what you exactly want to achieve but i am going to mention some tasks in time series data mining: Clustering Classification Segmentation Prediction Anomaly Detection Motif Discovery I think that this book: Time Series Book will help choose.


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So the problem you are asking about falls under the domain of feature selection, and more broadly, feature engineering. There is a lot of literature online regarding this, and there are definitely a lot of blogs/tutorials/resources online for how to do this. To give you a good link I just read through, here is a blog with a tutorial on some ways to do ...


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Do you just want that attribute's name, or do you also want a quantifiable metric (like a t-value) for this "best" attribute? For a qualitative approach, you can generate a classification tree with just one split, two leaves. For example, weka's "diabetes.arff" sample-dataset (n = 768), which has a similar structure as your dataset (all attribs numeric, ...


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How many features will be selected by mutual information filtering? If we go by the question description, we should only have 50 features selected. But this filtering is based on correlation with the variable to predict. And, also one the major drawbacks of Mutual Information Filtering is, they tend to select redundant variables because they does not ...


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How many features will be selected by mutual information filtering? Mutual information feature-selection evaluates the candidacy of each feature independently. Since there are essentially 100 features that are truly informative, we will ended up with 100 features by mutual information filtering. How many features will be selected by a wrapper method? A ...


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Have you tried Kimono Labs? It's free and pretty quick to set up with an intuitive UI. Kimono basically lets you scrape sites by training an API with CSS selectors created through a point and click interface. It does allow for batch url crawling, pagination, attribute selection, scheduled crawls, etc. and has a bunch of built in integrations.


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make them in one list like [A,B,C,D,M,N,B,X,M,F,B,M,A] make it weighted. The first char behind M weights 1, the second one weights 2, till the next M. sum them up. the char with lightest weight wins. (which means has some association in your word.)


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[Solved]. I just chucked numpy's genfromtext and opted to use read_csv from pandas since it gives the option to import text in 'utf-8' encoding.


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Two very different motivations have lead to time series analysis: Industrial quality control and detection of outliers, detecting deviations from a stable noise. Scientific understanding of trends, where the understanding of trends and of their determinants is of central importance. Of course both are to a large extent two sides of a same coin and the ...


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This uses the arules package: Lines <- "Segment trend duration description 1 1 C S C_S 2 2 VP L VP_L 3 3 VN S VN_S 4 4 N S N_S 5 5 P M P_M 6 6 VP M VP_M" library(arules) ...


0

Try this def clone_var(var, namefmt="%s"): if isinstance(var, Orange.feature.Discrete): newvar = Orange.feature.Discrete(namefmt % var.name, values=var.values) elif isinstance(var, Orange.feature.Continuous): newvar = Orange.feature.Continuous(namefmt % var.name) newvar.number_of_decimals = var.number_of_decimals ...


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There is no correct answer to your question, only opinions. So here is mine: I've also coded such a class, and asked me exactly the same thing. I concluded that I find Series nicer than Sequence. Moreover, I believe people -- particularly with little or no mathematic backgound -- do not make a difference here, but rather think of Time-Series when they hear ...


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The harmonic mean is the equivalent of the arithmetic mean for reciprocals of quantities that should be averaged by the arithmetic mean. More precisely, with the harmonic mean, you transform all your numbers to the "averageable" form (by taking the reciprocal), you take their arithmetic mean and then transform the result back to the original representation ...


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I would definitely run pairwise tests, i.e. one for each of the 475*949 pairs of classes you have as "important variables" can differ very much from case to case. Then run some standard feature selection algorithm, such as chi-square or information gain. See http://www.jmlr.org/papers/volume3/forman03a/forman03a.pdf for an extensive study.


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As a first draft, compute the average vector for each classes, normalize them to unit length, and compute the absolute differences. These should give you a rough indication of which words distinguish the two classes.


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Association rules can be used for prediction and thus can be evaluated the same way by splitting your data. Clustering: how would you use the result anyway? The way to "prove" clustering is to either use the result to improve classification performance, or by providing insights to a human user. If the user gained insight from clustering, then it worked!


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If you have labels, then use them, and do not use clustering at all. Clustering is meant for data where you do not have labels. How do you plan to proceed?


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I think the characters (e.g. Ä°) are causing the problem in genfromtxt. I found the following reads in the data you have here, dtypes = "i8,S12,S12,S12,S12" + ",i8"*38 test = genfromtxt(open('data/test.csv','rb'), delimiter="," , names = True, dtype=dtypes) You can then access the elements by name, In [16]: test['P8'] Out[16]: array([ 4, 5, 5, 8, ...


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What you're asking is basic Digital Signal Processing questions, and has not much to do with data mining. You should read an introduction to DSP, otherwise you won't really understand what you're doing, and everyone that does might correctly criticize your results. There's presence in a Biomed conference proceedings that deals with vibroarthrography, i.e. ...


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Minimum support count is the % of the all transaction.suppose you have 60% support count and 5 is the total transaction then in number the min_support will be 5*60/100=3.


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Correctly written it is Information-gain = entropy-before-split - average entropy-after-split the difference of entropy vs. information is the sign. Entropy is high, if you do not have much information of the data. The intuition is that of statistical information theory. The rough idea is: how many bits per record do you need to encode the class label ...



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