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2

This seems like a custom made problem for a graph database. You make a node for each set or subset, and a node for each element of a set, and then you link the nodes with a relationship Contains. E.g.: Now you put all the elements A,B,C,D,E in an index/hash table, so you can find a node in constant time in the graph. Typical performance for a query ...


2

This problem is known in the literature as subset query. It is equivalent to the "partial match" problem (e.g.: find all words in a dictionary matching A??PL? where ? is a "don't care" character). One of the earliest results in this area is from this paper by Ron Rivest from 19761. This2 is a more recent paper from 2002. Hopefully, this will be enough of a ...


3

If I understand your needs correctly, you need a multi-state storing data structure, with retrievals on combinations of these states. If the states are binary (as in your examples: Has milk/doesn't have milk, has sugar/doesn't have sugar) or could be converted to binary(by possibly adding more states) then you have a lightning speed algorithm for your ...


4

I'm confident that I can now contribute to the solution. One possible quite efficient way is a: Trie invented by Frankling Mark Liang Such a special tree is used for example in spell checking or autocompletion and that actually comes close to your desired behavior, especially allowing to search for subsets quite conveniently. The difference in your case ...


1

Hashing is usually an efficient technique for storage and retrieval of multidimensional data. Problem is here that the number of attributes is variable and potentially very large, right? I googled it a bit and found Feature Hashing on Wikipedia. The idea is basically the following: Construct a hash of fixed length from each data entry (aka feature vector) ...



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