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This can also be easily done with reshape2 (with the same result as David Arenburg's answer): df <- read.table(text = "id variable value Pos like 77 Neg like 58 Pos make 44 Neg make 34 Pos movi 154 Neg movi 145", header = TRUE) require(reshape2) df2 <- dcast(df, variable ~ id, value.var="value") library(ggplot2) ggplot(df2, ...


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my_data_set <- read.table(text = " id variable value Pos like 77 Neg like 58 Pos make 44 Neg make 34 Pos movi 154 Neg movi 145", header = T) library(data.table) my_data_set <- as.data.frame(data.table(my_data_set)[, list( Y = value[id == "Neg"], X = value[id == "Pos"]), by = ...


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Just found this question while searching for a way to add more space between bars. Like Lars said, you can change the bar size after the chart has been drawn. However, when you increase the bar height without changing the space between each bar, it overflows. To add space between the bars you should use xRange: var chart = ...


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You can add this: var transform; var size=treeData.name.length; if((size>1)&&(size<=5)){transform=10} if((size>5)&&(size<=10)){transform=100} //YOU HAVE TO ADD MORE STATEMENTS BASED ON YOUR NEEDS .... var vis = d3.select("#viz").append("svg:svg") .attr("width", 400) .attr("height", 300) ...


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In general, you would assign the contents of the JSON to a variable, like so: var json = {...}; In this case in particular, have a look here.


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Every chord has data associated with it. This data has, among other things, source and target attributes, which point to the nodes that the chord connects. In the code above, the index attribute of the source and target nodes is referenced to identify which ones to filter. This can be anything you want though. In your application, depending on what the ...


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I am posting my efforts here since it is easier to type all that is needed in a greater box, if nothing else. I created a FIDDLE to help us out. A few points: I had to change the variable/myfunc strategy because it was not working. You will need to tell me if this actually worked. The lines are pretty flat but your data seems to show little variation in ...


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You can get the x position and bar width directly from the elements. The y position you can get by passing the height to the scale -- no need for offsets. .attr("x", parseFloat(shape.attr("x")) + parseFloat(shape.attr("width"))/2) .attr("y", y._scale(d.height)) Complete demo here. I've added a small vertical offset to the labels so they don't overlap with ...


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You can do it by adding a separate series with it's own data, unfortunately there's a bug with multiple line series in version 1.1.5 which means line markers go haywire (so I've removed them from the code below). The good news is I've just finished rewriting all the line chart code and this problem will be fixed in the next version (coming in a week or so), ...


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You can prevent the excess ticks/labels by setting the time period for the axis to months: x.timePeriod = d3.time.months; Complete demo here.


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The tool tip gets its data from the axis, so to get more precision there you have to change the tick format for the y axis: y.tickFormat = ',.1f'; Complete demo here.


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?filled.contour has two options to set color: color.palette: a color palette function to be used to assign colors in the plot. col: an explicit set of colors to be used in the plot. This argument overrides any palette function specification. There should be one less color than levels You're supplying a vector of colors to color, which is interpreted as ...


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I'm Java developer too, and I have very good understanding of JS. My advice for you: First read good book, I recommend you "JavaScript Patterns" (Stoyan Stefanov) O'REILLY, it not very big book; and practice


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Use the Axis.Interval property in conjunction with the Axis.IntervalType property. For example Axis xaxis = chart.ChartAreas[0].AxisX; xaxis.IntervalType = DateTimeIntervalType.Minutes; xaxis.Interval = 30; should get you the 30 minute spacing that you desire.


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I think you want to look at Microsoft Visio (get the 2010 version. 2013 is almost unusable from a database standpoint). But if i am assuming correctly, you want to create a table per company. Don't do this! this can cause redundancy and data integrity problems. you want to create just one table and create what is called a unary many-to-many relationship. ...


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The surface style for such data looks unusual. What I would do when using SCaVis data analysis program is to create a grid for data in form of a 2D histogram, and than plot it as a surface. Here is a test.py file with this example that can be run inside SCaVis: from jhplot import * c1 = HPlot3D("Canvas") c1.setNameX("X") c1.setNameY("Y") c1.visible(1) ...


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There are some issues with the code. In general: NEVER call getGraphics on a Component! Apart from that, some minor things (don't extend JFrame, create the GUI on the EDT, and the naming conventions mentioned in the comments). The current structure of the code does not make it really easy to connect it to a GUI component. You should clearly think about ...


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How about good ol' imagesc? A = [ 0.95 0.91 0.86 0.85 0.9 0.95 0.96 0.85 0.81 0.7 0.95 0.96 0.85 0.81 0.7 ]; imagesc(A) colorbar axis image From the image you can easily read the entry/entries with maximum value.


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For the moment, I've implemented a version of GridFit in Python. If anyone else wants to use it, feel free - I'm happy for this to be under CC-Zero. There are probably ways to improve the algorithm, for example by using the point distribution (rather than the aspect ratio of the box) to choose when to bisect vertically and when horizontally. import numpy ...


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Check stock chart by amcharts: http://www.amcharts.com/stock-chart/ it supports multiple panels which can be used to visualize different dimensions and you can use a separate dataset for each item - this will allow users to select which items he wants to see at a time. Disclaimer: I am the author of amcharts.


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In theory you can solve this optimally using maximum weighted bipartite matching. But this takes time cubic in the number of points, which will be too slow for such large n. There are probably much faster heuristics that start from the same formulation as the exact solution, so it might nevertheless be useful to explain how you would set it up: Let A be a ...


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Do you use a pandas dataframe? It provides some functionality to load / write csvs easily and to display their content, like .dataframe.head(10) - which displays the first ten rows. dataframe.describe() will emit useful information about your data. If you want to try out a df you should use the following command before printing the df: import pandas as pd ...


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It sounds like what you are looking for is a scatterplot matrix, which shows the scatterplot for each pair of variables in a single grid. To do this in R, you can use the pairs() function. For instance, if your data are stored in data frame df, and your variables are called x1 through x5, you could do: pairs(~x1+x2+x3+x4+x5, data=df) This website provides ...


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var chartArea = new ChartArea("chartArea") { BackColor = Color.Transparent, AxisY = { Maximum = 100 }, AxisX = { LabelStyle = { Font = new Font("Calibri", 15f) } } }; chartArea.AxisX.IsLabelAutoFit = false; chart.ChartAreas.Add(chartArea); This will stop the automatic fitting of labels so each chart will have the same size labels. You may need to do some ...


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Thanks to @tonytonov for his great answer. I am also sharing what I was trying in the meanwhile and the output. [Note: modified the dataset cm to include method names instead of numbers from 1 to 9] max_cm <- max(na.omit(cm$CM)) min_cm <- min(na.omit(cm$CM)) ggplot(cm, aes(x=LB, y=DTI)) + facet_wrap(~Method, ncol=3) + geom_tile(data= subset(m, ...


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Here's what you can start with. You said that the scale should be from 0 to 1, but in your example maximum is about 0.6, so I took that into consideration: p <- ggplot(cm, aes(x=LB, y=DTI)) + facet_wrap(~Method, ncol=3) + geom_tile(aes(fill=CM), colour="white") + theme_bw() + coord_equal() + xlab(xlab) + ...


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You can use GetOrgChart library it has build-in zoom in zoom out features


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Yes - the problem is that your browser executes the 'points' block before your browser has a chance to load the CSV and draw the points to your canvas. Let me explain. Your browser executes the code from the top to the bottom, sequentially. This part - d3.csv('salaries.csv', function(dset){ data = dset.map(function(d) { return [ ...


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Here are the relevant lines from the Les Mis examples, simplified to your case. Let's take a look: # A "ColumnDataSource" is like a dict, it maps names to columns of data. # These names are not special we can call the columns whatever we like. source = ColumnDataSource( data=dict( x = [row['name'] for row in joined], y = [row['name'] for ...


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I would suggest finding out how many 'YES's and 'NO's you have first: var numYes = 0; var numNo = 0; var rangeYesNo = sheet.getRange(range).getValues(); for (i=0; i<rangeYesNo.length; ++i) { if (rangeYesNo[i].indexOf('yes') > -1){ numYes++;} if(rangeYesNo[i].indexOf('no') > -1){ numNo++;} } } and unless you want to try working ...


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It's my opinion (and the opinion of a couple of my professors) that stacked barcharts are difficult to read, especially when comparing sections of stacks that don't begin at the axis. Here's an alternative that may work for you. With this type of chart, you can easily read the duration of each action by subject. Taking your data to be d. d$DURATION <- ...


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Try this: library(ggplot2) ggplot(DF, aes(SUBJECT, DURATION, fill = ACTION)) + geom_bar(stat = "identity") + coord_flip() Here is the data frame used (to make it reproducible). Next time please use dput to output the data in the question. DF <- structure(list(SUBJECT = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, ...


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I had a similar problem. The solution was to use the .css('visibility', 'visible') instead of .hide() - because the element was hidden to start with using css styling.


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Welcome to the site, @Eszter Tak√°cs! You only need to specify the two IDs in newdata. Here is an example based on sleepstudy data in R. I assume you want to plot the predicted values on the y-axis. Just replace the code with your data and variables, you will obtain the predicted values for lowerID==0 and lowerID==1. Then you can use your code to plot the ...


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A possible solution that takes up a suggestion in Michael J. Crawley's excellent book "Statistics: an introduction using R" is the following code: attach(mtcars); model <- glm(formula = am ~ hp + wt, family = binomial); print(summary(model)); model.h <- glm(formula = am ~ hp, family = binomial); model.w <- glm(formula = am ~ wt, family = binomial); ...


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I think you are looking for barChart.calculateBarWidth. (src/bar-chart.js if you're considering submitting a PR ;) There have been other bugs reported against it recently to do with ordinal bar charts: https://github.com/dc-js/dc.js/issues/533 I don't know if there is also a bug with dates. It seems odd to me that the same code would work in a fiddle ...


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It looks like you are trying to tell when a running total crosses a threshold. In Tableau, doing that requires table calculations which operate on the aggregated values that have been returned from the data source. I put together an example viz to illustrate how to approach the issue. In the live version via the link above, try hovering over some of the ...


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Just some thoughts: Environmental Datasets As stated by the other comment, have a look to weather, forecast (or similar services). Space data What about data from the Universe? Flights Here's some real time flight tracking data: the evaluation plan is limited but free. Social Networks Twitter Streaming API, Facebook RealTime Updates API (in case you ...


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I know this is an old question, but an interesting one. I think a Javascript based data visualization library would fit the requirements very nicely. It's a scripting language making it appropriate for fast prototyping, and your code will basically work anywhere with a browser. There are numerous Javascript libraries for data visualization, I personally ...


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Have you considered environmental datasets? For one, there are near real time (say, hourly or 15m) data on streamflow and water quality. There's also a wealth of weather data served up via NOAA NCDC and APIs. How about some bouy data? Seeing this post reminded me that there's lots of flight tracking data out there which could be fun to visualize too.


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I tried and It works for me if I add this line of code: private void Form1_Activated(object sender, EventArgs e) { //Added some point just for an example chart1.Series["Series1"].Points.AddXY(1, 1); chart1.Series["Series1"].Points.AddXY(2, 2); chart1.Series["Series1"].Points.AddXY(3, 3); ...


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Dates are tricky to work with when you are sending data via JSON (since JSON does not have a date standard). The only way to get them input as proper Date objects is to use the full JSON DataTable syntax for specifying rows, columns, and cells of data. Since I'm not quite sure how this would be done in C#, I have an alternative approach I can demonstrate ...


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Here is my data set (note the 2 missing values): Month Value Jan-14 1 Feb-14 2 Mar-14 Apr-14 May-14 5 Jun-14 6 Jul-14 7 Aug-14 8 Sep-14 9 Oct-14 10 Nov-14 11 Dec-14 12 Here is my expression (taken from the built in Cumulative function): Sum([Value]) THEN Sum([Value]) OVER (AllPrevious([Axis.X])) Here is my result: So it looks like ...


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You can use a function in your spreadsheet like: =COUNTIF(A:A,"Yes") and the pending =COUNTIF(A:A,"No") so you can build the table directly in the spreadsheet: a demo here



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