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Here is another method: year.calcs <- function(x) { x[["pre.5"]] <- x$start - 5 x[["pre.1"]] <- x$start - 1 x[["post.5"]] <- x$end + 5 x[["post.1"]] <- x$end + 1 x } df <- year.calcs(x=DF2) Which returns > df column start end pre.5 pre.1 post.5 post.1 1 C1 2005 2012 2000 2004 2017 2013 2 C2 2001 2009 ...


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Assuming df is the name of your data frame then just use the following: df2 <- subset(df, df$HouseID==1:5)


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You can try newdf <- df1[!df1$HouseID %in% 6:10,] # HouseID Time KwH #1 1 1 X #2 2 1 X #3 3 1 X #4 4 1 X #5 5 1 X #11 1 2 X #12 2 2 X #13 3 2 X #14 4 2 X #15 5 2 X data df1 <- structure(list(HouseID = c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, ...


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An embedded database like SQLite is an easy way to store information. You could have columns(levelNumber INT, completed INT) where completed is either a 1 or 0. When you complete a level, send an update to the database changing completed to 1 for the appropriate level number. Before each level is loaded, have a method that checks your database for the ...


0

How can I store data for a game and save the values of variables This means you need to write your class objects in a file like this FileOutputStream fout = new FileOutputStream("c:\\game.ser"); // your file ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fout); oos.writeObject(address); For further details see this


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Persisting data between program executions means saving it to a file or database. There are many options available for this depending on your environment. It sounds like you are running the game as a local java application - if this is the case, saving a file is probably your best option. When the program starts up, it would read the file to find where it ...



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