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50

If you are using InnoDB or any row-level transactional RDBMS, then it is possible that any write transaction can cause a deadlock, even in perfectly normal situations. Larger tables, larger writes, and long transaction blocks will often increase the likelihood of deadlocks occurring. In your situation, it's probably a combination of these. The only way to ...


18

One way to cope with deadlocks is to have a retry mechanism that waits for a random interval and tries to run the transaction again. The random interval is necessary so that the colliding transactions don't continuously keep bumping into each other, causing what is called a live lock - something even nastier to debug. Actually most complex applications will ...


18

The problem you describe is not handled by the database, and from my experience is not entirely handled by Hibernate either. You have to take explicit steps to avoid it being a problem. Hibernate does some of the work for you. As per the previous answer, Hibernate ensures that within an isolated flush the inserts, deletes and updates are ordered in a way ...


15

In PostgreSQL the rows will be locked as they are updated -- in fact, the way this actually works is that each tuple (version of a row) has a system field called xmin to indicate which transaction made that tuple current (by insert or update) and a system field called xmax to indicate which transaction expired that tuple (by update or delete). When you ...


14

In general, deadlock means that two or more entities are blocking some sources, and none of them is able to finish, because their are blocking sources in a cyclic way. One example: Let's say I have table A and table B, I need to do some update in A and then B and I decide to lock both them at the moment of usage (this is really stupid behaviour, but it ...


13

There are a couple of things you can do to lessen the number of deadlocks you receive, and some things you can do to completely eliminate them. First off, launch SQL Server Profiler and tell it to give you a deadlock graph. Running this trace will tell you the other query which is conflicting with yours. Your query is quite simple, though I seriously ...


11

You need to capture the deadlock graph. Attach Profiler and capture the Deadlock Graph Event class. Save the .XDL graph and add that info to your post. Until then, is pretty obvious that your DB.Users.SingleOrDefault query requires an index on Name at least, if not on Name and Password: CREATE INDEX idxUsersNamePassword on Users(Name,Password); I expect ...


11

If you want to force every other connection to disconnect, and you have suitable permissions, you can bounce the database in and out of single user mode: alter database current set single_user with rollback immediate; go alter database current set multi_user; go Any other connection to the same database will be terminated.


10

A commonly used approach is some form of exponential back-off. Rather than your 1000*attempts+random aproach, make the delay an exponential function of the number of attempts. This ensures minimal latency in the first one or two attempts, where it might have just been bad luck that you deadlocked, but gives you much bigger delays later, when it is clear that ...


10

Deadlock analysis require access to SQL profiler to see the situation on database server at time off deadlock. Especially if you are not owner of SQL queries executed on DB this is necessary. When using EF, you are not the owner - EF generates queries. Deadlock must be solved on database queries and order of database operations performed withing transaction ...


9

What PostgreSQL does here is covered in the documentation on Explicit Locking. The example in the "Deadlocks" section shows what you're probably doing. The part you may not have expected is that when you UPDATE something, that acquires a lock on that row that continues until the transaction involved ends. If you have multiple clients all doing updates of ...


9

First, for having isolation level READ_COMMITTED you do not need to specify WITH RR, because this results in the isolation level SERIALIZABLE. To specify WITH RS (Read Stability) is enough. To propagate the FOR UPDATE WITH RS to the inner select you have to specify additionally USE AND KEEP UPDATE LOCKS. So the complete statement looks like this: SELECT ...


8

Is it better to automatically retry deadlocks. The reason being that you may fix this deadlock, only to hit another one later. The behavior may change between SQL releases, if the size of the tables changes, if the server hardware specifications change, and even if the load on the server changes. If the deadlock is frequent, you should take active steps to ...


8

To get results from DBCC PAGE you must enable traceflag 3604, otherwise the results go to the SQL server log: dbcc traceon (3604) then try the command dbcc page ( dbid, filenum, pagenum , 3) The fourth parameter is printopt: The printopt parameter has the following meanings: 0 - print just the page header 1 - page header plus per-row hex dumps ...


8

The answer is correct, however the perl documentation on how to handle deadlocks is a bit sparse and perhaps confusing with PrintError, RaiseError and HandleError options. It seems that rather than going with HandleError, use on Print and Raise and then use something like Try:Tiny to wrap your code and check for errors. The below code gives an example ...


8

How about something like this: public T DeadlockRetryHelper<T>(Func<T> repositoryMethod, int maxRetries) { int retryCount = 0; while (retryCount < maxRetries) { try { return repositoryMethod(); } catch (SqlException e) // This example is for SQL Server, change the exception type/logic if you're using another DBMS ...


8

Your code is essentially correct. The exception raised when a dead lock occurs is a SQLException. The exception's getSQLState() method provides returns an error code that provides additional information about the actual error. You should also wait a short amount of time between attemps, so as not to load your server too much. As you cleverly guessed, set a ...


8

The tasks that are dealocking are Connection acquisition tasks. That is, c3p0 is trying to acquire new Connections from your database, and those Connection acquisition attempts are taking a long time. The first thing I would do is upgrade to 0.9.2.1, which has a much improved means of performing a round of Connection acquisitions in situations where ...


8

The Root Cause When you combine a SELECT with a write statement such as INSERT INTO... or CREATE TABLE AS..., then MySQL has to establish a shared lock on the tables involved in the SELECT. You have another concurrent transaction (2) that holds an exclusive lock on the table phppos_sales, so transaction (1) can't get its S-lock, and transaction (1) waits. ...


7

READ UNCOMMITTED But that allows the process to read the data before a transaction has committed, what is known as a dirty read. Further Reading You may prefer to turn on row versioning, the update creates a new version of the row and any other select statements use the old version until this one has committed. To do this turn on READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT ...


7

Deadlock is what happens when two people need multiple resources to execute, and where some of the resources are locked by each of the people. This leads to the fact that A can't execute without something B has and vice versa. Lets say I have Person A and Person B. They both need to get two rows to run (Row1 and Row2). Person A locks Row1 and tries to ...


7

SELECTs cannot deadlock with other SELECT, because they only acquire shared locks. You say that we should consider that these SELECTs now 'require exclusive read locks', but this is not possible for us to consider because 1) there is no such thing as an exlusive read lock and 2) reads don't acquire exclusive locks. But you do pose a more general question, ...


7

Jeff Atwood had the same exception a while back: Coding Horror: Deadlocked!. His article might help :-)


7

The first time a thread (~connection) needs to lock some data during a transaction, a transaction "object" (~context) is created. The transaction "object" is not destroyed at the end of the transaction, it would be reused in case a new transaction is started by the same thread. Each transaction showing as not started is a transaction "object" owned by a ...


7

Because the enqueue involved is a 'TM' enqueue, and because the mode the lock is being held is 'SX' and the mode the lock is waited on is 'SSX', I can tell you, with absolute certainty, that this is due to a foreign key relationship, where the referring table (child table) column is not indexed. If you look for unindexed foreign keys and add indexes, this ...


7

Wait-die scheme: It is a non-preemptive technique for deadlock prevention. When transaction Ti requests a data item currently held by Tj, Ti is allowed to wait only if it has a timestamp smaller than that of Tj (That is Ti is older than Tj), otherwise Ti is rolled back (dies). In this scheme, if a transaction requests to lock a resource (data item), which ...


6

Your best bet for solving you deadlocking issue is to set "print deadlock information" to on using sp_configure "print deadlock information", 1 Everytime there is a deadlock this will print information about what processes were involved and what sql they were running at the time of the dead lock. If your tables are using allpages locking. It can reduce ...


6

According to a blog article that I've found the existance of an "Exchange Event" indicates that the source of your problem may be parallelism in your query. Today's Annoyingly-Unwieldy Term: "Intra-Query Parallel Thread Deadlocks" The above article goes into much more detail, however the punchline is: Workaround #1: Add an index or improve the query to ...


6

There's no history built-in to the database, however, when a deadlock occurs, a couple of things happen. First, it gets logged to the alert.log. Second, a trace file is written. So, there's some history recorded there. The tracefile will contain many useful bits of information, such as: - deadlock graph - SQL that encountered the deadlock - other ...


6

Session A tries to update ids 10, 2, 30, 4 and session B tries with 40, 30, 20, 10 They both try to lock their respective rows ready for update and A gets 10 and is waiting for 30 while B gets 30 and is waiting for 10. Deadlock. Your fundamental issue is that you are trying to update (some of) the same ids in concurrent transactions. Without knowing your ...



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