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181

First, always use the latest version of PostgreSQL. Performance improvements are always coming, so you're probably wasting your time if you're tuning an old version. For example, PostgreSQL 9.2 significantly improves the speed of TRUNCATE and of course adds index-only scans. Even minor releases should always be followed; see the version policy. Don'ts Do ...


134

Updated to 2.9 : autoConnectRetry simply means the driver will automatically attempt to reconnect to the server(s) after unexpected disconnects. In production environments you usually want this set to true. connectionsPerHost are the amount of physical connections a single Mongo instance (it's singleton so you usually have one per application) can ...


81

you can use time.time ot time.clock before and after the block you want to time import time t0 = time.time() code_block t1 = time.time() total = t1-t0 this method is not as exact as timeit (it does not average several runs) but it is straighforward. time.time() (in windows and linux) and time.clock(in linux) have not enough resolution for fast ...


23

Quite apart from the timing, this code you show is simply incorrect: you execute 100 connections (completely ignoring all but the last one), and then when you do the first execute call you pass it a local variable query_stmt which you only initialize after the execute call. First, make your code correct, without worrying about timing yet: i.e. a function ...


13

If you are profiling your code and can use IPython, it has the magic function %timeit. %%timeit operates on cells. In [2]: %timeit cos(3.14) 10000000 loops, best of 3: 160 ns per loop In [3]: %%timeit ...: cos(3.14) ...: x = 2 + 3 ...: 10000000 loops, best of 3: 196 ns per loop


9

Do I need to tune the JVM settings of Cassandra to utilize more memory? The DataStax Tuning Java Resources doc actually has some pretty sound advice on this: Many users new to Cassandra are tempted to turn up Java heap size too high, which consumes the majority of the underlying system's RAM. In most cases, increasing the Java heap size is actually ...


7

In Column Filters set TextData Not Like exec sp_reset_connection


7

We finally figured out how to do a splitted sync of the index. Here are some basic steps that show what we did: CREATE INDEX concat_DM_RV_idx ON DOCMETA (FULLTEXTIDX_DUMMY) INDEXTYPE IS CTXSYS.CONTEXT PARAMETERS ('datastore concat_DM_RV_DS section group CTXSYS.AUTO_SECTION_GROUP NOPOPULATE '); see the NOPOPULATE parameter? that says the indexer that it ...


7

Use different disk layout: different disk for $PGDATA different disk for $PGDATA/pg_xlog different disk for tem files (per database $PGDATA/base//pgsql_tmp) (see note about work_mem) postgresql.conf tweaks: shared_memory: 30% of available RAM but not more than 6 to 8GB. It seems to be better to have less shared memory (2GB - 4GB) for write intensive ...


6

It's probably your work_mem setting being too low. I'd check that first. I have been bitten by this recently. Second most likely problem is that you're missing a foreign key index. Exposition follows. In general, there are several questions that need to be asked whenever database performance looks sub-par: Are you using an up-to-date version? Every point ...


6

You can create the index with or without the INCLUDE: SQL Server will ignore it if the PrimaryKeyCol is the clustered index. That is, it won't store the clustered index value twice For completeness, I probably would in case I ever change the clustered index Edit: I've observed via size that SQL Server deals with this intelligently This is not as ...


5

You want the query log - but obviously doing this on a heavy production server could be... unwise.


5

Was finished writing the question when the answer hit me, so posting anyway for knowledge sharing! I realised that the return value of the metaphone function was UTF8. The compare to a latin1 field was obviously incurring a fairly heavy performance overhead. I replaced the variable assignment with: SET @metaphone_val:= CONVERT(double_metaphone(...


5

Yes, there is a difference. There are new features/behaviour changes in the patch-sets which would be only enabled if compatible parameter is bumped up accordingly. Here is an example: http://blog.grid-it.nl/index.php/2013/06/09/asm-rebalance-power-limit-from-0-1024-starting-from-11-2-0-2/. (ASM power limit range is changed with compatible>=11.2.02). The ...


5

The performance is much more dependent on the chosen database engine for MariaDB or MySQL. MariaDB provides support for a faster write cache enabled engine called "Aria" compared to the default MyISAM Engine of MySQL. Aria is usually faster for temporary tables when compared to MyISAM because Aria caches row data in memory and normally doesn't have to ...


4

There is a way as long as you haven't renamed them usually Database Tuning Advisor generated objects are prefixed with _dta so you can view them by running this query FOR indexes SELECT * FROM sys.indexes where name like '_dta%' FROM Stats SELECT * FROM sys.stats where name like '_dta%' And from there I guess you would know ...


4

Windows Azure SQL Database offers dynamic management views (DMVs) that return server state information that can be used to monitor the health of a server instance, diagnose problems, and tune performance. For a list of available views refer to System Views (Windows Azure SQL Database). For examples of how to find CPU-intensive queries, long-running queries ...


4

"the initialization of bind variables been added contention" Contention doesn't mean how you use it here. There is no contention, no competing for resource. Rather, what you have is a number of similar statements. They are similar because SQL*Plus has substitution variables; these are not bind variables and resolve to hard-coded values. Hence, each ...


3

You can use Profiler for this purpose - from SSMS, go to Tools -> SQL Server Profiler.


3

Using this query, you can determine the number of pages (8 KB blocks of space) a SQL Server table uses: SELECT t.NAME AS TableName, p.rows AS RowCounts, SUM(a.total_pages) AS TotalSpace, SUM(a.used_pages) AS UsedSpace FROM sys.tables t INNER JOIN sys.indexes i ON t.OBJECT_ID = i.object_id INNER JOIN sys.partitions p ON ...


3

the only way to get rid of this is to not run the DTA on a live db. create a backup of the live db, restore it, and run DTA on that.


3

Here is a simple demo script to start your journey into learning about the SQL Server Internals. To see the individual actions of a query go to Paul Randal's SQLSkills Blog. Other posts on this blog will cover topics like DBCC PAGE which will allow you to see the contents of the PAGE and DBCC IND which will show you the allocation maps for tables/indexes. ...


3

Do you have an index on the expression that yields the title? Better yet, one on (user_id, title_expression). If not, that might be an excellent thing to add, so as to nestloop through the first 25 rows of an index scan, seeing that Postgres can't reasonably guess which random 25 rows (hence the seq scan you're currently getting on the joined table) will be ...


3

"Table access full" is not an error, it's a data access path. Sometimes it's even the optimal one. If you're sure the performance problem is on the sub-select, to speed that up the optimal indexes are likely: Index on mytable2(c2) Index on mytable1(b2,b1) (in that order) The fields that need to be indexed to be useful for the join are mytable2.c2 and ...


3

From the fact that you're using PHP, and seeing that creating just a 1000 nodes is 67 seconds, I assume you're using the regular REST API (eg. POST /db/data/node). If this is correct, you may be right that 2.0.1 is some percentage point slower than 1.8 for these CRUD operations. In 2.0 we focused on optimizing Cypher and the new transactional endpoint. As ...


3

a few hundred users simultaneously connected max_connections = 100 Are you using a connection pooler? If so, which one, and how is it configured? I'm using JDBC to access postgress, running 1 to 10 simultaneous threads accessing the database. ... or is connection pooling effectively handled by your Java application? If so, is 10 a hard limit for ...


2

In general it is much harder to fix a poor database design that is causing performance issues after going live becasue you have to deal with the existing records. Even worse, the poor design may not become apparent until months after going live when there are many records instead of a few. This is why databses should be designed with performance in mind (no ...


2

That worked for me on Ubuntu. Find and open your MySQL configuration file, usually /etc/mysql/my.cnf on Ubuntu. Look for the section that says “Logging and Replication” # * Logging and Replication # Both location gets rotated by the cronjob. # Be aware that this log type is a performance killer. log = /var/log/mysql/mysql.log or in newer versions of ...


2

Focus on one specific thing. Disk I/O is slow, so I'd take that out of the test if all you are going to tweak is the database query. And if you need to time your database execution, look for database tools instead, like asking for the query plan, and note that performance varies not only with the exact query and what indexes you have, but also with the data ...



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