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By using argument list.len one can choose the number of variables in the data frame to list. See below. In this case I'm listing 602 variables. str(df, list.len = 602) Found this answer within R help > ?str Had to play around with several arguments as didn't find the help too clear, so am posting as it might save someone's time.


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You can use the argument list.len: str(df, list.len=ncol(df)) and if you want to print more observations you could set the argument vec.len, also have a look at ?str for documentation of all arguments.


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I believe the following works though might not be as streamlined as you would like. dfnames <- c("d","e") scores.d <- data.frame(x = 1, y = 1:10) scores.e <- data.frame(x = 2, y = 11:20) vals <- 61:70 for (i in dfnames){ #don't need seq_along dat<-get(paste0("scores.",i)) #pull up the data dat$new.col<-vals ...


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A more manual way to do this is: for row in df.iterrows(): print row[1][1] == row[1][2] This will give you a visual check if the columns match or not.


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You could call groupby and nunique: >>> df Col1 Col2 Col3 0 T1 1 G1 1 T2 1 G1 2 T3 2 G1 3 T4 5 G2 4 T5 5 G2 5 T6 5 G2 >>> df.groupby("Col3")["Col2"].nunique() Col3 G1 2 G2 1 Name: Col2, dtype: int64 This contains the number of unique Col2 values for each Col3 value. If you ...


2

One of the issue in addition to my main goal that I have at this point of the code is my dataframe still has NaN. That's beacause df.fillna does not modify DataFrame, but returns a new one. Fix it and your result will be fine.


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This is untested. The idea is that when you load() a file, there are R objects that get loaded. For this example, I'm assuming each file only contains a single R object. In the getList() function, we load the file into a temporary environment, read it, find the name, and return the object (which is hopefully a list). Major assumption here is that there's ...


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#This may work do.call(cbind,mget(paste0(1:1000,"_list.hv_Amono_volume_rand"))) #Edit: as per comments Example: x1<-as.list(1:3) x2<-as.list(4:6) save(x1,file="mydata1.RData") save(x2,file="mydata2.RData") tem<-list.files(pattern="*.RData") str(tem) chr [1:2] "mydata1.RData" "mydata2.RData" kk<-lapply(tem,load) List of 2 $ : chr "x1" $ ...


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Here I create some example data to work with. a <- c(1:10) b <- c(11:20) description <- c("Stroke","ALS","Parkinsons","STROKE","STROKE","stroke","Alzheimers","Stroke","ALS","Parkinsons") df<-data.frame(a,b,description) df a b description 1 1 11 Stroke 2 2 12 ALS 3 3 13 Parkinsons 4 4 14 STROKE 5 5 15 ...


1

POSIXlt values are actually lists, and that's the problem. You can see this with is.list(df$Time) # [1] TRUE ls.str(df$Time) # gmtoff : int [1:10] NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA # hour : int [1:10] 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 # isdst : int [1:10] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 # mday : int [1:10] 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 # min : int [1:10] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 # mon ...


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You could use pd.crosstab: import numpy as np import pandas as pd df = pd.read_table('data', sep='\s{2,}', parse_dates=[0]) table = pd.crosstab(index=[df['timestamp']], columns=[df['colA'], df['colB']]) yields colA a b colB x y x y timestamp 2014-01-01 00:10:01 0 0 0 1 2014-01-01 ...


3

You overwrite result every time hence the reason you only get the last result, also you don't need to use a loop this will work: df[name_list.index].to_csv('result.csv') Example: In [21]: import pandas as pd import io temp="""A,B,C,D,E,F,G 1,2,3,4,5,6,7""" temp1="""Name B E F""" df = pd.read_csv(io.StringIO(temp)) print(df) name = ...


1

You can try this: Data: df1 <- data.frame(uniqueSessionsIni=as.POSIXlt(c('2015-01-05 15:00:00','2015-01-05 16:00:00', '2015-01-05 17:00:00 ')), uniqueSessionsIni=as.POSIXlt(c('2015-01-05 15:59:00','2015-01-05 16:59:00', '2015-01-05 17:59:00 '))) #note that the names column below should be of character class and not factor allPairs ...


0

You could try library(reshape2) res <- dcast(dfN, ...~paste0('year', year, 'Freq'), value.var='freq') data dfN <- structure(list(pmid = c(184L, 406L, 407L, 407L, 408L, 450L, 450L ), title_char = c(77L, 142L, 110L, 110L, 79L, 58L, 58L), title_wrds = c(10L, 20L, 16L, 16L, 10L, 7L, 7L), year = c(2010L, 2008L, 2008L, 2003L, 1998L, 2012L, 2009L), ...


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If I understand you question correctly you need to do the following: Some Data: df <- data.frame(sales=runif(100), profit=runif(100)) Solution You can use the following function: getperrows <- function(x, k) { x <- x[order(x$sales, decreasing=T),] x <- transform(x, temp=cumsum( (x$sales)/sum((x$sales)))) #print(x) m <- ...


0

The error means that the column is recognized as float, not string. Fix the way you read the data e.g.: #!/usr/bin/env python import sys import pandas def hh_mm_ss2seconds(hh_mm_ss): return reduce(lambda acc, x: acc*60 + x, map(int, hh_mm_ss.split(':'))) df = pandas.read_csv('input.csv', sep=r'\s{2,}', converters={'Avg. Session ...


1

You can convert time to seconds with time and datetime from standard python library: import time, datetime def convertTime(t): x = time.strptime(t,'%H:%M:%S') return str(int(datetime.timedelta(hours=x.tm_hour,minutes=x.tm_min,seconds=x.tm_sec).total_seconds())) convertTime('0:03:26') # Output 206.0 convertTime('0:04:03') # Output 243.0


3

df['Avg. Session Duration'] should be strings for your function to work. df =pd.DataFrame({'time':['0:03:26']}) def time_convert(x): times = x.split(':') return (60*int(times[0])+60*int(times[1]))+int(times[2]) df.time.apply(time_convert) This works fine for me.


0

There are a number of ways to do this. Here's one using the dplyr package. I've created some fake data for illustration. library(dplyr) # Fake data set.seed(5) # For reproducibility dat = data.frame(valueX = runif(1000, 1, 2e6), valueY = rnorm(1000)) Now we'll bin the data and summarise it using the pipe operator %>% which allows us to chain functions ...


0

Edit: Just realized you're using pandas - should have looked at that. I'll leave this here for now in case it's applicable but if it gets downvoted I'll take it down by virtue of peer pressure :) I'll try and update it to use pandas later tonight Seems like itertools.groupby() is the tool for this job; Something like this? import csv import ...


2

Use thousands=',' argument for numbers that contain a comma In [1]: from pandas import read_csv In [2]: d = read_csv('data.csv', thousands=',') You can check Prize_Pool is numerical In [3]: type(d.ix[0, 'Prize_Pool']) Out[3]: numpy.float64 To drop rows - take first observed, you can also take last In [7]: d.drop_duplicates('Contest_Date_EST', ...


0

I suggest a solution using ggplot+reshape2, with random data: set.seed(10) drools <- data.frame(matrix(round(runif(50, 50, 1000)), ncol=5)) java <- data.frame(matrix(round(runif(50, 50, 1000)), ncol=5)) library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) df <- data.frame(melt(drools), melt(java)[2]) names(df) <- c("column", "drools", "java") df2 <- melt(df) ...


0

This was the solution I found worked. The matching columns must share the same name, and then I removed the non-important data from the zip-code file, but if I had left it all in, it would have added all the additional demographic data as well. mergeddf = pd.merge(dfone,dfzip,on='zip',how='left') I also tried map, using this code: dfone['state'] = ...


0

After a long night, I got the answer since every event was ocurring only once I added an extra column in the file with the number one and then indexed the dataframe by this: df = pd.read_excel("somefile.xls",index_col='Numberone') And then simply tried this: df.hist(by=df['Offense Type']) finally getting exactly what I wanted


1

Given: In [245]: series Out[245]: (10, 9, 2011) 668 (10, 8, 2011) 584 (9, 4, 2011) 505 (8, 13, 2011) 502 (9, 5, 2011) 497 (8, 6, 2011) 489 (5, 27, 2012) 480 dtype: int64 In [246]: df Out[246]: date avgtemp 0 (7, 27, 2011) 76.01 1 (7, 28, 2011) 71.51 2 (7, 29, 2011) 72.50 3 (7, 30, 2011) 81.05 4 (7, ...


3

You could use groupy/agg: import pandas as pd data = [['a','e'], ['b','f'], ['c','g'], ['d','h'], ['a','i'], ['b','j'], ['c','k'], ['d','l']] df = pd.DataFrame(data, columns=['first', 'second']) print(df.groupby(['first']).agg(lambda x: x.tolist())) yields second first a [e, i] b [f, j] c [g, k] d [h, l]


0

Another alternative, similar to Joran's: try: dfm = pd.merge(df1, df2, how='outer', left_index=True, right_on='z') except IndexError: dfm = df1.reindex_axis(df1.columns.union(df2.columns), axis=1) I'm not sure which is clearer but both the following work: In [11]: df1.reindex_axis(df1.columns.union(df2.columns), axis=1) Out[11]: a b c x ...


0

try: dfm = pd.merge(df1, df2, how='outer', left_index=True, right_on='z') except IndexError: dfm = df1 if not df1.empty else df2 might be sufficient for your needs


1

This should get you started. Matplotlib does not handle the text placement for you so you will probably need to play around with this. import pandas as pd import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # replace this with your existing code to read the dataframe df = pd.read_clipboard() plt.scatter(df.X, df.Y, s=df.Magnitude) # annotate the plot # unfortunately you ...


3

You can use cbind to add the new column to the data frames in the list: lapply(l, function(x) cbind(x, x[,2]*2)) # [[1]] # c.1..2..3. c.2..3..4. x[, 2] * 2 # 1 1 2 4 # 2 2 3 6 # 3 3 4 8 # # [[2]] # c.7..8..9. c.5..6..2. x[, 2] * 2 # 1 7 5 10 # 2 ...


0

Here is an alternative method. It uses the RecordLinkage package and finds the shortest form of a sorted vector. You can adjust your threshold level. structure(list(sno = structure(c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 7L, 8L), .Label = c("JHN", "JOHN", "JON", "SIRIS", "SIRIUS", "SIRUS", "STEPHEN", "STIPHEN"), class = "factor"), names = structure(c(2L, 2L, 2L, ...


1

For the agrep part, here's one way - you can play with the parameters to tune your results: sim <- setNames(lapply(1:nrow(df), function(i) agrep(df$names[i], df$names, max.distance = list(all=2, insertions=2, deletions=2, substitutions=0))), df$names) sim <- lapply(sim, function(x) unique(df$names[x])) df$names2 <- sapply(sim, "[", 1) ...


1

You can use get() to return a variable reference based on a string of its name: > x <- 1:10 > get("x") [1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 So, yes, you could iterate through dfnames like: dfnames <- c("df1","df2") df1 <- df2 <- data.frame(X = sample(1:10), Y = sample(c("yes", "no"), 10, replace = TRUE)) for (cur.dfname in dfnames) { ...


1

I'm not sure that this is exactly what you want, but anyway: d = dict(tweets=tweetlist, users=userlist) pandas.DataFrame({k : pandas.Series(v) for k, v in d.iteritems()})


0

A bit weird what you're asking to do, but basically we can iterate over the columns in steps of 2 and then call sum on a subsection of the df and pass axis=1, this will concatenate the str values. One tricky point is that your columns are numbers and when using square brackets in this way it tries to parse the column name as a str which means that col+1 ...


1

Perform a merge and pass the list of columns to param on, the default type of merge is 'inner' which only matches where values exist in both dfs: In [2]: df.merge(df1, on=['id','year','CalendarWeek','DayName','interval']) Out[2]: id year CalendarWeek DayName interval counts NewCounts 0 1 2014 1 sun 10:30 3 4 1 ...


1

The issue I suspect is that you do not return the updated frame variable. While you assign to the SMSx variable in the function scope, as soon as the function exits that is lost. I'm not sure how this is working however, since you do not first define the SMSx variable (it's the name of the current function, or is also a global variable?) def SMSx(frame): ...


0

Don't know if it could be more elegant, but you can do: >>> df.set_index('Name') .groupby(level=0) .apply(lambda x: x.stack().value_counts()) .unstack() .fillna(0) Detailed: >>> df.set_index('Name') >>> A B C D E F Name John 1 0 -1 -1 -1 1 Lisa 0 1 -1 2 0 2 ...


0

Not tested: setNames(data.frame(do.call(rbind,lapply(1:length(parsedData),function(i)cbind(parsedData[[i]][1],parsedData[[i]][2])))),c("Date","Volatility") OR: setNames(data.frame(do.call(rbind,lapply(1:length(parsedData),function(i)t(parsedData[[i]][1:2])))),c("Date","Volatility"))


1

If you want to select for each studentID, the row that has the highest SGBSTDN_TERM_CODE_EFF you could do, using dplyr: library(dplyr) df %>% group_by(studentID) %>% arrange(SGBSTDN_TERM_CODE_EFF) %>%slice(n())


1

A base R solution. You can order the data and then use duplicated to select the rows that you want. # some data dat <- data.frame(studentID = c(1, 2, 2, 2, 4, 4, 5, 6, 8, 8), SGBSTDN_TERM_CODE_EFF = c(199920, 199920, 200040, 200320, 200130, 200220, 200140, 200020, 200430, 200540), SGBSTDN_MAJR_CODE_1 = letters[1:10]) ...


0

Your function returns the data frames unchanged because this is the last thing evaluated in your function. Instead of: columnselect<-function(df){ df[,c("Block","Name","F635.Mean","F532.Mean","B635.Mean","B532")] df} It should be: columnselect<-function(df){ ...


2

You can use matlab's table data structure as in T = table( rand(4,3) ); and modify the metadata properties with T.Properties.VariableNames = {'c1' 'c2' 'c3'}; % columns T.Properties.RowNames = {'A' 'B' 'C' 'D'}; % rows Column names can't be pure numbers though, because you need to access them as in T.c1 % get the column c1 T{'A',:} % get ...


0

Try pck <- lapply(pck, unlist, use.names = F)


0

This is how I got it to save into the same dataframe on the same excel sheet. def Bucket(num1, num2, num3, num4, num5, num6, num7, num8, name, name_total, name_unprocessed, insideframe): for num1 in driver.find_elements_by_xpath('.//a [contains(@href, "%s&singleTopic=1&dashboardSort=a")]' %name): print('%s a: ' %name + num1.text) ...


1

Simply df + 1 will do that for you.


1

The reason this happens is mutation and conversion. If you have two vectors a = [1:3] b = [4:6] you can make x refer to one of them with assignment. x = a Now x and a refer to the same vector [1, 2, 3]. If you then assign b to x x = b you have now changed x to refer to the same vector as b refers to. You can also mutate vectors by copying over ...


1

You may try indx <- (vapply(strsplit(names(df1)[-1], '_'), function(x) { x1 <- as.numeric(x) x1[1] >x1[2]}, logical(1L)))+0L df1[-1] <- indx[col(df1[-1])] df1 # ID 10_1 2_20 #1 1 1 0 #2 2 1 0 Or you can try sub v1 <- as.numeric(sub('_.*', '', names(df1)[-1])) v2 <- as.numeric(sub('.*_', '', ...


0

Your code will fail as the parmas to the DataFrame ctor are: pandas.DataFrame(data=None, index=None, columns=None, dtype=None, copy=False) So even if it didn't complain it wouldn't produce what you want. There are various methods of joining, merging and concatenating multiple dfs, in your case concat is what you want: df1 = pd.concat([first_slice, ...


1

Try this: df[:A] = float64(df[:A]) This works for me on Julia v0.3.5 with DataFrames v0.6.1. This is quite interesting though. Notice that: df[:, :A] = [2.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0] will change the contents of the column to [2,2,3,4], but leaves the type as Int64, while df[:A] = [2.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0] will also change the type. I just had quick look at the ...



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