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103

A long time ago I read a great analogy for explaining the difference between the two. I don't remember where I read it so unfortunately I can't credit the author for the idea, but I've also added a lot of my own knowledge to the core analogy anyway. So here goes: A stream socket is like a phone call -- one side places the call, the other answers, you say ...


14

If you already have it in a string, just use getByName(): InetAddress host = InetAddress.getByName("192.168.1.110"); Using bytes is cluttered, and possibly dangerous (due to signed byts used in Java). Stick with Strings if you can.


14

There's a trick to using unix datagram sockets. Unlike stream sockets (tcp or unix domain), datagram sockets need endpoints defined for both the server AND the client. When one establishes a connection in stream sockets, an endpoint for the client is implicitly created by the operating system. Whether this corresponds to an ephemeral TCP/UDP port, or a ...


11

It's been a while since I've used Java's DatagramSockets, Channels and the like, but I can still give you some help. The UDP protocol does not establish a connection like TCP does. Rather, it just sends the data and forgets about it. If it is important to make sure that the data actually gets there, that is the client's responsibility. Thus, even if you ...


11

UDP datagrams cannot be partially delivered┬╣; they are delivered as-is or not at all. So yes, you can be sure that the received datagram was sent exactly as you see it on the receiver's end. Edit to incorporate Will's comment which is the best kind of correct (i.e., technically): ┬╣They can be fragmented at the IP level, but the network stack on the ...


10

There are about 15 independent questions in there, but I'll do my best to address them: There is a bind() method, as well as a connect() and disconnect(). There is no unbind(). Is this because upon disconnecting the socket is unbound? bind() is separate from connect() and disconnect(). Bind is used to bind a socket to a particular port -- effectively ...


10

You are trying to send to a broadcast address. It is not allowed, see manpage for sendto(2): EACCES (For UDP sockets) An attempt was made to send to a network/broadcast address as though it was a unicast address. Set the SO_BROADCAST option, if you actually mean to send to a broadcast address: s.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_BROADCAST, ...


9

Get a network tool like Wireshark so you can see what is happening on the wire. UDP makes no retransmission attempts, so if a packet is dropped somewhere, it is up to the program to deal with the loss. TCP will work hard to deliver all packets to the program in order, discarding dups and requesting lost packets on its own. If you are seeing high latency, ...


9

I guess you don't need help with basic building of programs and OpenSSL. For specifics of Android and OpenSSL, take a look at Fries's GitHub repository called android-external-openssl. Take a look especially at README located here: http://github.com/fries/android-external-openssl/blob/master/README.android There you have step by step instructions on how ...


8

This would be operating system dependent. While you failed to specify an operating system it isn't important anyway. To remain portable you should always anticipate your datagram sockets receiving out of order data.


8

I've just finished a new fork of the current official Android openssl and got it building with ndk-build from NDKr5b. I tried to make it as easy as possible to build. It doesn't build the ARMv4 assembly stuff yet, it was failing, so any help with that would be most appreciated. Here's the git repo: https://github.com/eighthave/openssl-android just run ...


8

The javadoc for setSoTimeout says: With this option set to a non-zero timeout, a call to receive() for this DatagramSocket will block for only this amount of time. If the timeout expires, a java.net.SocketTimeoutException is raised, though the DatagramSocket is still valid. So, if you want to send packets if no response has been received after 1 ...


8

You should put this in a new thread. The process of receiving a packet involves synchronous IO, so it will always block whichever thread it's running in. To clarify, it's not the while loop itself that makes the rest of the program wait. It's the socket.receive() call.


8

To put things simply, a Socket that is open is a socket that is either waiting for connection or has successfully connected with another Socket. When a socket has been closed, it means that this socket is no longer available for connection, and that it's resources has already been released. A Socket that is connected, well, it means that the socket is ...


7

A DatagramSocket remains bound when disconnected, it is the close() method that would unbind it. Note that for a UDP (datagram) socket the semantics of connect() and disconnect() are different as compared to a TCP (or other connection oriented) socket. UDP is a connectionless protocol and a bound DatagramSocket can send and receive packets without being ...


7

This page gives a fairly good overview on socket states: http://diranieh.com/SOCKETS/SocketStates.htm and the difference between TCP and UDP sockets. Particularly: State "Open" (TCP and UDP): An unnamed socket has been created. An unnamed socket is one that is not bound to a local address and port State "Connected" (TCP only): An association (virtual ...


6

netty provides many entry points to setting up a server, I don't know which one you've used. You should be able to simply .unbind (or .close) the Channel you get back from ServerBootstrap.bind


6

There's no problem casting the positive integer literals into byte values, even if they overflow. The InetAddress.getByAddress() function copes perfectly well with the fact that values exceeding 127 will be converted into negative numbers. The only thing you need to watch out for is converting the signed bytes back into integers if you subsequently want to ...


6

UDP doesn't block (It only blocks while it is transferring the data to the OS) This means if at any point the next hop/switch/machine cannot buffer the UDP packet it drops it. This can be desirable behaviour in some situations. But it is something you need to be aware of. UDP also doesn't guarantee to delivery packets in the order they are sent. not to ...


6

How did you create your socket ? Is it a raw socket (SOCK_RAW) or a dgram socket (SOCK_DGRAM) ? In the second case, you won't get ip/udp headers, only payload. By the way, the packet length is the returned value of the function recvfrom - in your case, the "ret" variable. Check recvfrom man page.


6

The answer is in the specification for send: [EPIPE] The socket is shut down for writing, or the socket is connection-mode and is no longer connected. In the latter case, and if the socket is of type SOCK_STREAM or SOCK_SEQPACKET and the MSG_NOSIGNAL flag is not set, the SIGPIPE signal is generated to the calling thread. ...


6

You need to set an additional option - receiveBufferSizePredictorFactory. in order to predict how much space it needs to allocate in order to hold the incoming message, netty uses a predictor that predicts the amount of byte to allocate. there are two type of receive buffer size predictors, adaptive and fixed-size. the predictors are created by a predictor ...


5

Sure - here's an example. And here's the Javadoc for DatagramPacket.


5

The proximate cause of your error is that write() doesn't know where you want to send the data to. bind() sets the name of your side of the socket - ie. where the data is coming from. To set the destination side of the socket, you can either use connect(); or you can use sendto() instead of write(). The other error ("Address already in use") is because ...


5

AF_UNIX SOCK_DATAGRAM/SOCK_SEQPACKET datagrams need contiguous memory. Contiguous physical memory is hard to find, and the allocation fails, logging something similar to this on the kernel log: udgc: page allocation failure. order:7, mode:0x44d0 [...snip...] DMA: 185*4kB 69*8kB 34*16kB 27*32kB 11*64kB 1*128kB 1*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = ...


5

UDP does not guarantee delivery, so you can tweak parameters, but you can't guarantee that the message will get delivered, especially in the case of very large data transfers. If you need to guarantee delivery, you should use TCP instead. If you need (or want) to use UDP, you can encode each packet with a number, and also send the number of packets ...


5

The following Java tutorial should get you started: All About Datagrams.


5

Example of UDP datagram sending and receiving (source): import java.io.*; import java.net.*; class UDPClient { public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception { BufferedReader inFromUser = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in)); DatagramSocket clientSocket = new DatagramSocket(); InetAddress IPAddress ...


4

You pass UdpClient.Send() an array of bytes (Byte[]), an integer size, and an IPEndPoint. If you are sending the entire byte array, nothing more and nothing less, as your datagram's payload, you can just use the Length property of arrays as follows: UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient(); IPAddress ipAddress = Dns.Resolve("www.contoso.com").AddressList[0]; ...


4

SOCK_DGRAM as the type gets you a UDP socket. You can encapsulate UDP in TCP of course, but you'd have to handle the UDP part in userspace. Whether something is reliable depends on the protocol on the wire. If you use TCP, it is reliable; UDP is not. To create a UDP socket: int s; s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0); To create a TCP socket: int s; s ...



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