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139

The 2nd argument to moment() is a parsing format rather than an display format. For that, you want the .format() method: moment(testDate).format('MM/DD/YYYY'); Also note that case does matter. For Month, Day of Month, and Year, the format should be uppercase.


70

You may want to use the STR_TO_DATE() function. It's the inverse of the DATE_FORMAT() function. STR_TO_DATE(str,format) This is the inverse of the DATE_FORMAT() function. It takes a string str and a format string format. STR_TO_DATE() returns aDATETIME value if the format string contains both date and time parts, or a DATE or TIME value if the ...


40

You can try Date.parse(date_string). You might also use Date#strptime if you need a specific format: > Date.strptime("10/15/2013", "%m/%d/%Y") => Tue, 15 Oct 2013 For a general solution: format_str = "%m/%d/" + (date_str =~ /\d{4}/ ? "%Y" : "%y") date = Date.parse(date_str) rescue Date.strptime(date_str, format_str)


34

20128 is a valid year and Java hopes the world to live that long I guess. if the number of pattern letters is more than 2, the year is interpreted literally, regardless of the number of digits. Reference. If you want to validate if a date is in limit, you can define one and check- SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy"); Date ...


29

SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd"); Date date = format.parse("20120405");


26

std::tm tm = {}; std::stringstream ss("Jan 9 2014 12:35:34"); ss >> std::get_time(&tm, "%b %d %Y %H:%M:%S"); auto tp = std::chrono::system_clock::from_time_t(std::mktime(&tm)); Because GCC doesn't implement std::get_time you should also be able to write: std::tm tm = {}; strptime("Thu Jan 9 12:35:34 2014", "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S", &tm); ...


24

I think you want to use the HH format, rather than 'hh' so that you are using hours between 00-23. 'hh' takes the format in 12 hour increments, and so it assumes it is in the AM. So this SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"); Date date = sdf.parse("2009-08-19 12:00:00"); System.out.print(date.toString()); Should print out ...


20

Very helpful answer! I had forgotten about STR_TO_DATE(). Here's a table of the codes for that amazing second parameter, with examples. Sources are my cheatsheets, and the MySQL documentation for DATE_FORMAT() -- Bob Stein -----examples-for------ 1999-12-31 2000-01-02 23:59:58.999 03:04:05 identical to ------------ ---------- ...


19

This works in all browsers on my box - try it in the console: alert(new Date('2001/01/31 12:00:00')) so new Date('2001-01-01T12:00:00Z'.replace(/\-/g,'\/').replace(/[T|Z]/g,' ')) IE8, FF3.6, Safari4, Chrome


19

Using Joda-Time, take a look at DateTimeFormat; it allows parsing both kind of date strings that you mention (and almost any other arbitrary formats). If your needs are even more complex, try DateTimeFormatterBuilder. To parse #1: DateTimeFormatter f = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"); DateTime dateTime = f.parseDateTime("2012-01-10 23:13:...


16

SimpleDateFormat will parse dates into Java Date objects: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/text/SimpleDateFormat.html SimpleDateFormat format1 = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss"); // first example SimpleDateFormat format2 = new SimpleDateFormat("MMMMM dd,yyyy"); // second example Date d1 = format1.parse( dateStr1 ); Date d2 = ...


14

You can use a "lambda" "TargetDate": "/Date(1606953600000)/", "FormatDate": function() { return function(rawDate) { return rawDate.toString(); } }, ... Then in the markup: <td> {{#FormatDate}} {{TargetDate}} {{/FormatDate}} </td> From the link: When the value is a callable object, such as a function or lambda, the ...


14

The result you are getting is absolutely right. Let's analyze this: 17.08.2012 05:35:19:7600000 17: Day of month (17th) 08: Month of year (August) 2012: Year (2012) 05: Hour of day (5am) 35: Minute of hour (:35) 19: Second of minute (:19) 7600000: Milliseconds of second (7,600,000) Now, the way the VM sees this is that you are declaring the time of ...


13

Date.parse is already mentioned. I prefer Date.strptime. This methods is a reverse strftime. Date.parse is a (maybe good) guess, with Date.strptime you can parse each date, when you know which format you expect. Example: require 'date' puts Date.strptime('December 09, 2011', '%B %d, %Y') Or if you have another format where Date.parse fails: ...


12

The year is relative to 1900. That's a "feature" of the Date class. Try to use Calender.


11

The math functions which only process the string once will be the fastest. A quick test run shows that: year = Integer.parseInt(dateString.substring(0, 4)); month = Integer.parseInt(dateString.substring(4, 6)); day = Integer.parseInt(dateString.substring(6)); Takes ~800ms while: int date = Integer.parseInt(dateString); year = date / 10000; month = (date ...


11

See the javadoc Year: If the formatter's Calendar is the Gregorian calendar, the following rules are applied. For formatting, if the number of pattern letters is 2, the year is truncated to 2 digits; otherwise it is interpreted as a number. For parsing, if the number of pattern letters is more than 2, the year is interpreted literally, ...


10

Date::Parse supplies str2time, which does this. The documentation lists some examples that the module can parse: 1995:01:24T09:08:17.1823213 ISO-8601 1995-01-24T09:08:17.1823213 Wed, 16 Jun 94 07:29:35 CST Comma and day name are optional Thu, 13 Oct 94 10:13:13 -0700 Wed, 9 Nov 1994 09:50:32 -0500 (EST) Text in ()'s will be ...


9

Basically your problem is that you are using a SimpleDateFormat(String pattern) constructor, where javadoc says: Constructs a SimpleDateFormat using the given pattern and the default date format symbols for the default locale. And if you try using this code: DateFormat osLocalizedDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("MMMM EEEE"); System.out.println(...


9

The first form is being considered as an ISO date in UTC, according to section 15.9.1.15 of ECMA-262. The second form is being considered in an implementation-specific way, as per section 15.9.4.2: The parse function applies the ToString operator to its argument and interprets the resulting String as a date and time; it returns a Number, the UTC time ...


9

Do as below using Date::parse: require 'date' Date.parse('December 09, 2011').to_s # => "2011-12-09"


9

It's perfeclty explained in the MDN on the parse function (whose parsing is used in the Date constructor) : Given a date string of "March 7, 2014", parse assumes a local time zone, but given an ISO format such as "2014-03-07" it will assume a time zone of UTC. Therefore Date objects produced using those strings will represent different moments in time ...


9

Java's SimpleDateFormat doesn't support an ordinal suffix, but the ordinal suffix is just eye candy - it is redundant and can easily be removed to allow a straightforward parse: Date date = new SimpleDateFormat("MMM dd yyyy hh:mma").parse(str.replaceAll("st|nd|rd|th", "")); The replace regex is so simple because those sequences won't appear anywhere else ...


8

Perhaps you are thinking of PHP's strtotime() function, the Swiss Army Knife of date parsing: Man, what did I do before strtotime(). Oh, I know, I had a 482 line function to parse date formats and return timestamps. And I still could not do really cool stuff. Like tonight I needed to figure out when Thanksgiving was in the US. I knew it was the 4th ...


8

The result format is the default format of Date#toString() (click link to see the javadoc). You're apparently doing a System.out.println(date). You would like to use SimpleDateFormat#format() instead with another pattern to format it in the desired format. E.g. String newDateStr = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss").format(date); Update: You ...


8

So, in principle this would be done using different SimpleDateFormat patterns. Here a list of patterns for the individual declarations in RFC 3339: date-fullyear: yyyy date-month: MM date-mday: dd time-hour: HH time -minute: mm time-second: ss time-secfrac: .SSS (S means millisecond, though - it is not clear what would happen if ...


8

The proper way to do it is to parse it into a Date object and format this date object the way you want. DateFormat inputDF = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, d MMM yyyy H:m:s z"); DateFormat outputDF = new SimpleDateFormat("d MMM yyyy"); String input = "Mon, 14 May 2012 13:56:38 GMT"; Date date = inputDF.parse(input); String output = outputDF.format(date); ...


8

Java 7 Convert the String to a Date... SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("hh:mm a"); TimeZone gmt = TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"); sdf.setTimeZone(gmt); Date date = sdf.parse("6:00 am"); Because there is no date information, this will be the milliseconds since the epoch + your time. Convert the Date to seconds long seconds = date.getTime() / ...


7

I would imagine Joda has something of a Formatter to do this for you. I found this with a quick google search: http://johannburkard.de/blog/programming/java/date-time-parsing-formatting-joda-time.html DateTimeFormatter parser1 = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("dd/MMM/yyyy:HH:mm:ss Z"); DateTimeFormatter parser2 = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd ...


7

The year uses small caps y: System.out.println(new SimpleDateFormat("MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy", Locale.ENGLISH). parse("Sep 26 19:00:32 2012")); Large cap Y is "Week year" according to javadoc.



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