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10

How about: my $where = ''; my @values = ( $from, $till ); if ( $phone_number ) { $where = 'AND phone_number=?'; push @values, $phone_number; } That eliminates the need for your else clause. You could also use something like SQL::Abstract. use SQL::Abstract; ... my ( $sql, @values ) = SQL::Abstract->new->select( 'calls', ...


6

You ask: how can I retrieve the statement AS EXECUTED ie after data-binding as occured ? Generally you cannot. Most non-toy RDBMS will perform the binding server-side, not client-side, and most non-toy perl DBD drivers will take advantage of that. Check your database server's logs. However, DBI's tracing facility might give you enough to go on. ...


6

There is a lot of examples where is useful get only one row, and these functions simplify the search process. For example, to get the count of a result set my $sql = "select count(*) from people where age>?"; my ($count) = $dbh->selectrow_array($sql, undef, 42); The alternative requires: prepare, bind & execute, fetch and finish.


5

PostgreSQL prefers that you use numbered placeholders ($1, $2, ...) over the positional ? placeholders so someone is translating your ? placeholders to number placeholders; that's why your SQL: UPDATE instances SET ? = ? ends up as: UPDATE instances SET $1 = $2 in the error message. Now the real problem is that you can't use placeholders for ...


5

Neither fetching data using DBI nor printing will convert \t into a tab. The only time Perl converts \t is if it's found in a double-quoted string literal[1], which is to say in a file passed to perl, do, require or use, or in a string passed to perl -e or eval EXPR. If you have a tab, you are taking steps to convert \t to a tab, or it's actually a tab in ...


5

Not knowing what sort of SQL you are executing sounds like a bad idea to me, but that's not what you asked, so... Check the docs and you will find: You can tell if the statement was a SELECT statement by checking if $sth->{NUM_OF_FIELDS} is greater than zero after calling execute.


5

Remove 2-nd my $dbh: sub get_db_handle { unless (defined ($dbh)) { $dbh = DBI->connect(# <- no "my" here ('DBI:mysql:' . my_host), my_user, my_pass, {PrintError => 0, AutoCommit => 0} ) ...


5

Depending on your database driver, you may* be able to use type hints in bind_col: use DBI qw(:sql_types); ... my $sth = $dbh->prepare('SELECT id, name FROM foos WHERE name = "bar"'); $sth->execute; $sth->bind_col(1, undef, { TYPE => SQL_INTEGER, StrictlyTyped => 1, DiscardString => 1 }); while (my $hr = ...


4

There's no such thing as fork on Windows. It's a feature specific to unix systems. Perl emulates it using threads on Windows, and this is causing problems. Rather than trying to recreate an existing connection, simply create the connections in the task. In other words, use if (fork()) { my $dbh = connect_mysql(); $dbh->do(...); } else { my ...


4

Regular indexing can't be used to improve that query. MySQL indexes are B-trees, which means they can find a prefix of the indexed column very quickly. But since your LIKE query has % at the beginning, there's no unique prefix to search for. So every row has to be scanned to match against the pattern. However, MySQL also supports full-text searching. This ...


4

You should use fetchrow_hashref instead, and do each one individually. That will make it a lot more readable, and it does not affect performance form a database point of view. while (my $res = $sth->fetchrow_hashref) { print Dumper $res; $sth2->execute($res->{ID_NUMBER}); } If you wanted to do it with the fetchall_hashref, it would work like ...


4

Don't use DBI's quote method here: $pt_sel_hdl->execute($test_acct_no, $DBHdl->quote($suffix)); When you use ? placeholders in your SQL, the database driver will correctly parameterize the query arguments that you pass to execute. You are probably creating a query that is searching for the literal string " " (including the quotes) when you want to ...


4

The ? in the prepare will make sure that everything is escaped. So if you pass in stuff that has ' it will escape the quotes: '\'%\'+x\'0A\'+\'%\'' Which can be more easily written as: q{'%'+x'0A'+'%'} will turn into: ... LIKE '\'%\'+x\'0A\'+\'%\'' And thus it does not find anything.


4

Although ThisSuitlsBlackNot is nearly correct there are some important omissions from his answer. As the author of most of the StrictlyTyped and DiscardString attributes I can tell you that in fact, the DiscardString attribute is far more important in this case. DBI will attempt to cast your data to the TYPE specified and if that fails your data will be ...


3

You need fetchall_arrayref, but with an argument. This returns an arrayref of hashrefs: my $results_arrayref = $dbh->fetchall_arrayref( {} ); You can also choose to include only certain columns in the hashref - see the documentation for more details: https://metacpan.org/module/DBI#fetchall_arrayref For clarity you probably want to write that data ...


3

How can obtain only the tables (without doing a uniq) The $dbh->tables interface is too simple, I'd guess, to represent the complexity of SQL engines and the various drivers. As you noticed, you should use table_info() instead. In particular, see the DBD::SQLite documentation for table_info() (v1.39 at the time of writing), as DBD docs can tell you ...


3

You can use statements like these if you don't want to specify every single field: CREATE TABLE newtable LIKE oldtable (and possibly using ALTER TABLE after this to add the new field) INSERT INTO newtable SELECT * FROM oldtable CREATE TABLE AS [$received_sql]


3

If you're using MAC OSX, just fire up a terminal and type 'cpan'. Allow it to configure automatically and do some stuff, then you can install modules by just typing install Your::Module::Name. To get out of cpan just hit ctrl-c or type quit. You can also install directly from the command line by using cpan -i 'Your::Module::Name'. NB: You may need to ...


3

To handle this you could check if the email address already exists. my $sth = $dbh->prepare("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM emp WHERE email = ?"); $sth->execute($email); my $rows = $sth->fetchrow_arrayref(); $sth->finish(); if ($rows->[0] == 0) { # Insert your email address } else { # Show an error message } And as amon pointed out you ...


3

As others have said you can test to see if the email already exists but what happens if someone submits your form and it gets to the insert after another copy of your code has already tested the email does not exist. It would be better to simply catch this condition by wrapping your insert in an eval (as you already have RaiseError enabled) and testing err ...


3

$sth->RowsInCache; # Wrong. Method call for non-existent method. $sth::RowsInCache; # Wrong. Looking for a variable $RowsInCache in package `sth' $sth->{RowsInCache} # Right. RowsInCache is an attribute accessed as hashref element. However, given what you want to do, this might seems better: ... $sth->execute; while (my $row = ...


3

Your problem is your q{} quoting, which is literal string quoting with no interpolation. Thus, you are searching for records where the code field is set to the five character literal string value $code. One solution would be to quote with interpolation — either "" or qq{}. However, this is prone to unpleasant SQL injection and thus strongly discouraged. ...


3

What to do You want instead something like: $fieldnames = join ', ' => map { $dbh->quote_identifier($_) } keys %row; $placeholders = join ', ' => map { '?' } values %row; ... $sth = $dbh->prepare('INSERT INTO t ($fieldnames) VALUES ($placeholders)'); $sth->execute(values %row); (The quote_identifier call is there for safety in case your ...


3

DBD::PG has support for PostgreSQL arrays, so you can simply write a query like this: WHERE typeid = ANY( ARRAY[1,2,3] ) or, with a parameter... WHERE typeid = ANY(?) Then just use the array support my @targets = (1,2,3); # ... $query->execute(\@targets);


3

In MySQL, user-defined variables are session-specific. You can set a variable in one statement and access it in a later one: $dbh->do('SET @foo := 0'); my ($result) = $dbh->selectrow_array('SELECT @foo'); print $result; # 0


3

You're passing an undefined value for the first parameter to validate_extra. Most obviously this would happen if your call was just validate_extra(); but you may have passed the wrong variable by mistake, or perhaps the original connect has failed but gone unchecked: my $dbh = DBI->connect('DBI:mysql:database=mydb', 'user', 'pass', {PrintError => ...


3

According to the DBD::mysql changelog, this was fixed in v4.024 (released September 17, 2013). Your output shows that you're only using v4.022, so you'll need to upgrade DBD::mysql. You can find the bug report detailing the issue here.


3

In the DBD::SQLite documentation it says this: This is because DBD::SQLite assumes that all the bind values are text (and should be quoted) by default. One way around it is this: $r = $dbh->selectall_arrayref('select 123 where 5 > (?+0)', { Slice => {} }, 2) or die $dbh->errstr; Another probably better way is to set the ...


3

Try this instead: $r = $dbh->selectall_arrayref('select 123 where 5 > 0+?', { Slice => {} }, 2); Alternatively, do: my $sth = $dbh->prepare('select 123 where 5 > ?'); $sth->bind_param(1, 2, DBI::SQL_INTEGER); $sth->execute; $r = $sth->fetchall_arrayref({});


3

The problem is that you have declared two $dbh variables inside the BEGIN block. The unless checks whether the outer $dbh has been defined and, if not, declares a new $dbh, assigns a database handle to it, and then throws it away. The subroutine returns the value of the outer $dbh, which is always undef. The solution is to remove the my from the beginning ...



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