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16

Hows about: BEGIN { unshift @INC, sub { printf "Moose first called by pkg %s at line %d in %s\n", (caller)[0,2,1] if $_[1] eq 'Moose.pm'; }; } This "works" because subroutine references in @INC are called and passed the coderef and filename as arguments. See require perldoc: As mentioned by phaylon, you can also use Devel::TraceLoad to get ...


12

No need to be so heroic. Using a reasonably modern version of DBD::mysql, the hash returned by DBI's column info method contains a pre-split version of the valid enum values in the key mysql_values: my $sth = $dbh->column_info(undef, undef, 'mytable', '%'); foreach my $col_info ($sth->fetchrow_hashref) { if($col_info->{'TYPE_NAME'} eq 'ENUM') ...


12

DBIx::Class::Helper::ResultSet::SetOperations my $rs1 = $rs->search({ foo => 'bar' }); my $rs2 = $rs->search({ baz => 'biff' }); for ($rs1->union($rs2)->all) { ... }


11

Perl doesn't care about whitespace and comments between package and the package name, but the PAUSE indexer does. It won't index packages that look like that. The DBIx::Class folks don't want that class indexed. Another (more standard) way of doing this is the no_index key in the META.json or META.yml file.


9

From the documentation of DBIx::Class::Storage If DBIC_TRACE is set then trace information is produced (as when the debug method is set). ... debug Causes trace information to be emitted on the debugobj object. (or STDERR if debugobj has not specifically been set). debugobj Sets or retrieves the object used for metric collection. Defaults to an instance ...


9

The way you use the SQL::Abstract condition would result in this where condition: WHERE username = ? AND date >= 'DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 14 DAY)' When you wish to use database functions in a where clause you need to use a reference to a scalar, like this: date => { '>=' => \'DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 14 DAY)' }, ProTip: if you ...


8

You can’t really, due to the goals for which DBIC result sets are designed: They compile down to SQL and run a single query, which they do no earlier than when you ask for results. They are composable. Allowing filtering by code that runs on the Perl side would make it extremely hairy to achieve those properties, and would hide the fact that such result ...


8

For those still interested by this, it's finally been implemented as of 0.08192 or earlier. (I'm on 0.08192 currently) One correct syntax would be: __PACKAGE__->has_one(dual => 'Schema::Half', sub { my $args = shift; my ($foreign,$self) = @$args{qw(foreign_alias self_alias)}; return { "$foreign.whole_id" => { -ident => ...


7

You can deploy() your schema: my $schema = MyApp::Schema->connect( $dsn, $user, $password, ); $schema->deploy( { add_drop_table => 1 } ); Of course, the above will drop your existing tables :)


7

You can go either route. You can create a schema and get DBIx::Class to analyse it, or you can get DBIx::Class to build the schema to you. The former does not have to be inefficient for production, since you can get DBIx::Class to save the generated code so that it doesn't have to do the analysis every run.


6

Semi-transparently there is DBIx::Class::Cursor::Cached (from mst, like DBIC). You need to provide a Cache object to your connections or schema objects though. Seems very undocumented unfortunately. The Cookbook does have an example for using Tie::Cache on DBIC, and there are also the (get|set|clear)_cache functions on DBIx::Class::ResultSet, but they ...


6

I don't know if you can do much better than the online documentation. Between the introduction, walkthrough example, and cookbook, I think you'll have all you need to get started. Once you've looked through those, most of what you'll need for working with the ORM can be found in the ResultSet pod. If you're really looking for a book, Jonathan Rockaway's ...


6

Are you familiar with DBIx::Class::Schema::Loader? Although it can be used in one-off scripts to create a DBIC schema dynamically in memory, it also has the ability to run in a "one-shot" mode where it writes the schema definitions to disk for you to edit and build on, and it's way more advanced than you might think. First, you want to have the schema ...


6

If you're having to map back and forth between Moose classes and a DBIC schema, you may want to look at a persistent object store like KiokuDB instead. You lose some of the features of a Relational Database, especially if you have an existing schema but you gain a lot of features the main one being quiet mapping between the data-store and your Object model. ...


6

What if you connect with this: my $schema = MyDatabase::Main->connect( 'dbi:SQLite:data/sample.db', '', # empty username '', # empty password {sqlite_unicode => 1} ); Maybe connect() is looking for the options hash-ref as argument four without realizing that SQLite doesn't need the username and password arguments.


6

There is a lot of examples where is useful get only one row, and these functions simplify the search process. For example, to get the count of a result set my $sql = "select count(*) from people where age>?"; my ($count) = $dbh->selectrow_array($sql, undef, 42); The alternative requires: prepare, bind & execute, fetch and finish.


5

Assuming you're using InnoDB as your storage engine, this is the behavior I would expect. The default transaction isolation level for InnoDB is REPEATABLE READ. This means that when you perform your SELECT, the transaction gets a snapshot of the database at that particular time. The snapshot will not include updated data from other transactions that have ...


5

Here's a simple way that you could add caching with CHI. I haven't actually tried this, so there may be pitfalls I haven't considered, especially with regard to the serialization of DBIC result sets. package My::Table; use strict; use warnings; use base 'DBIx::Class'; use Storable 'freeze'; use CHI; $Storable::canonical = 1; ...


5

IIRC, you should be able to pass an array reference of multiple search conditions (each in its own hashref.) For example: my $result = $schema->resultset('MyTable')->search( [ { 'status_date' => \$start_criteria }, { 'status_date' => \$end_criteria }, ] ); Edit: Oops, nervermind. That does an OR, as opposed to an AND. It looks like ...


5

You can use the proxy attribute on a relationship to enable the accessors -- it's documented in add_relationship of DBIx::Class::Relationship::Base and you can use it with belongs_to like: __PACKAGE__->belongs_to( 'item' => 'MyApp::Schema::Item', 'item_id', { proxy => [ qw/purchase_date/ ] } ); which will make all of your Printer objects ...


5

See the DBIx::Class cookbook on the "Profiling" section for examples on how to do that. Simply enabling profiling via the DBIC_TRACE=1 environment variable will not do what you want, but you can sub-class DBIx::Class::Storage::Statistics (as per the linked cookbook example) and override query_start and query_end in a way that lets you count the SQL queries ...


5

You can find out who is loading a particular module, by inserting a few lines at the start of the module to get the "caller". Find Moose.pm in your library tree (perl -mMoose -wle'print $INC{"Moose.pm"}', and edit it to: package Moose; use Data::Dumper; warn "!!! Moose is being loaded by: ", Dumper([caller]); This is quick and dirty, but it sounds like ...


5

A couple of things to improve the code above: Remove the extra "Core" from the second load_components call, you already have it in the "extends" line. The second "add_columns" call can be made shorter by using the new "+col" syntax which allows you to amend/update an existing column definition, rather than adding a whole new one, see ResultSource docs.


5

Man, that is annoying. Looks like it's not possible to get what you want as it is. _build_loader_components in Catalyst::Helper::Model::DBIC::Schema adds it unless you have no namespaces and no resultset namespace. It pushes your extra component= list onto that. my @components = $self->old_schema && (not $use_namespaces) ? () : ...


5

my $rs = $schema->resultset( 'table' )-> search_rs( {} , { '+columns' => { unit => \do { "CASE WHEN me.service_id='GPRS' THEN 'KB' " . "WHEN me.service_id='SMS' THEN 'SMS' END" } } ) ; Something along this line should work.


5

No, the documentation is incorrect. Using a transaction alone does not avoid this problem. It only guarantees that the whole transaction is rolled back if an exception should occur - so that no inconsistent state will be persisted to the database. To avoid this problem you must lock the table - inside a transaction, because all locks are released at the end ...


5

One solution is to define the relationships with different names than the columns e.g. rel_$colname. Then the accessor methods generated by DBIC will be different for the column value and the related object(s). If you don't want to change your relationship names you can always access the column value with $row->get_column('colname');


5

DBIx::Class::Schema::Loader's dbicdump script can be used for dumping schema. An example from the documentation: dbicdump -o dump_directory=./lib \ -o components='["InflateColumn::DateTime"]' \ -o debug=1 \ My::Schema \ 'dbi:Pg:dbname=foo' \ myuser \ mypassword


5

In a typical Catalyst setup with Catalyst::View::TT and Catalyst::Model::DBIC::Schema you'll need several things for UTF-8 to work: add Catalyst::Plugin::Unicode::Encoding to your Catalyst app add encoding => 'UTF-8' to your app config add ENCODING => 'utf-8' to your TT view config add <meta http-equiv="Content-type" content="text/html; ...


5

You configured DBIx::Class to inflate the value of the 'created' column to a DateTime object. Note that you only need to load the TimeStamp component which is based on InflateColumn::DateTime, not both! Furthermore you should add on_connect_call => 'datetime_setup' to your DBIx::Class connect_info to make DBIC set the database datetime format to match ...



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