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12

You are adding it as a maven repository but in your old config you are saying that it is ivy repositories, I think it should be something like: resolvers += Resolver.url("Repo-name", url("http://example.com/"))(Resolver.ivyStylePatterns) Checkout the sbt 0.13 (which play 2.2 uses) docs on resolvers for more info: http://www.scala-sbt.org/release/docs/...


9

Dont add anything to plugins.sbt, following official documentation: https://github.com/schaloner/deadbolt-2/tree/master Add to your build.sbt (without , and with one blank line) resolvers += Resolver.url("Objectify Play Repository", url("http://schaloner.github.com/releases/"))(Resolver.ivyStylePatterns) resolvers += Resolver.url("Objectify Play Snapshot ...


4

Update: This solution is not working, I had the dependencies in the cache. I solved it like this: project/plugins.sbt: // Comment to get more information during initialization logLevel := Level.Warn // The Typesafe repository resolvers ++= Seq( Resolver.url("Objectify Play Repository", url("http://schaloner.github.io/releases/"))(Resolver....


4

It's not possible to have dynamic information in an annotation, but you can use params to define the name of an incoming value in the request. However, this information isn't passed into the handler at the moment because it expects a map. While you can pass in a map of parameters from the restrictedResource tag, you can't do this from an annotation so an ...


3

plugins.sbt is for plugins to sbt, the build tool, so for example you would put a release plugin, or maybe a count lines of code-plugin there, build.sbt is for your actual project so stuff you want to use inside your project goes there for play to load plugins that you have made available on the classpath (either by putting them in the lib/ directory or by ...


3

Steve, the developer of Deadbolt, suggested me the following: the trick is to store the user in the context, and then have your controller or deadbolt handler to access it. This allows you to store the user by the actual class, and not have to use getSubject() and cast the resulting Subject to your actual User class. So I decided to save the User ...


2

The best way to do this IMO is to use the Dynamic annotation, and give each one a distinct name that describes the function of the method. Since you have a finite number of annotated methods in your code, you can then store these names in a database (possibly caching them, as suggested above, for performance). In the admin panel, you can then associate ...


2

It looks like you need to change the onAuthFailure of your DeadboltHandler implementation. If you have copied the one from the example code, it's returning a 403. Instead, you should return a redirect to your login page.


2

This is not related to EGit at all. It seems like you have added the project itself as a source folder, instead of app. To correct this, do the following: Open the properties of the project Go to Java Build Path > Source Remove the project folder from the build path Add the app folder to the build path


2

Deadbolt isn't really for this kind of conditional switching, but you could hack it in the following way: Create another DeadboltHandler, called something like SubjectPresentHandler Implement the SubjectPresentHandler#onAuthFailure method to redirect to the profile page Annotate your signup method with @SubjectNotPresent(handler=SubjectPresentHandler....


2

You could do this in Deadbolt by wrapping your page content in a dynamic tag. The name given to the tag maps to a DynamicResourceHandler, which can then do a lookup in the DB to see if the current user has access to the page. For example, you view would look like this: @(handler: my.app.MyDynamicResourceHandler) @dynamic("handlerName", "pageKey", handler)...


1

I'll make this change for the next release of Deadbolt. Update: Version 2.3.2 of Deadbolt now gives you... Scala: Future[Option[Subject]] Java: F.Promise Additionally, this version is available via Maven Central so you don't need to specify the Objectify Repository resolver any more. Older versions still require the resolver.


1

Try adding this to your build.sbt file. It resolved issues I was having with securesocial and postgresql dependencies: resolvers += Resolver.url("sbt-plugin-releases", url("http://repo.scala-sbt.org/scalasbt/sbt-plugin-releases"))(Resolver.ivyStylePatterns)


1

I noticed this as well and looked through some of the source. It looks like both the @Restrictions and @Restrict annotations were replaced with only @Restrict. From the comments on the current @Restrict code: Within an {@Group} roles are ANDed, and between {@Group} the role groups are ORed. For example, @Restrict({@Group("foo"), @Group("hurdy", "gurdy)...


1

I've fixed this and released a new version - switch to version 2.2-RC4 and you should be fine. "be.objectify" %% "deadbolt-java" % "2.2-RC4"


1

The only way you can do this is by downloading the source code and then modify it to return a future. I did that, but then decided it was better not to do this, because I would hit the database on each request, even when it wouldn't be necessary. My solution is to store enough data in the session to authorise the user. Of cause this depends on how much ...


1

The constructor of SubjectPresentHandler takes an ExecutionContextProvider as a parameter. The easiest way to do this is to inject one and have the creation of the handler done via Guice. The ExecutionContextProvider is provided by DeadboltModule - you can see this here. @Singleton public class SubjectPresentHandler extends AbstractDeadboltHandler { @...


1

Versioning in Deadbolt follows the same x.y version of Play, so Deadbolt 2.4 is for Play 2.4, Deadbolt 2.5 is for Play 2.5 and so on. Deadbolt 2.5.0 was released today, so if you update your version to "be.objectify" %% "deadbolt-scala" % "2.5.0" you should be fine. This is documented here.


1

The problem lies in your implementation of HandlerCache: @Singleton public class MyHandlerCache implements HandlerCache { private final Map<String, DeadboltHandler> handlers = new HashMap<>(); public MyHandlerCache() { handlers.put("DEFAULT_KEY", new MyDeadboltHandler()); } @Override public DeadboltHandler apply(...


1

You need to call be.objectify.deadbolt.core.DeadboltAnalyzer.


1

There is no way you can map a Future[A] to an Option[B] without first waiting for the Future to complete. Whatever is calling getSubject knows it's a synchronous call, and thus will wait for the Option[Subject] whether you use Futures within it or not. override def getSubject[A](request: Request[A]): Option[Subject] = { val user = Await.result(...


1

You could try implementing your DeadboltHandler#onAuthFailure method in this way public F.Promise<Result> onAuthFailure(Http.Context context, String content) { Subject subject = getSubject(); if (subject == null) { // 401 Unauthorized } else { // 403 Forbidden } }


1

Roles The roles held by a user should be available from your AuthorisedUser object. The AuthorisedUser class must implement be.objectify.deadbolt.core.models.Subject, and the getRoles() method returns your roles. If you're using an ORM such as Hibernate, roles will be populated when you access it via AuthorisedUser. Groups The strings provided to the ...


1

As David suggested, you can wrap this up in your own tag. Tags are just functions, and look like other views (in fact, they are other views). You can try something like @(userProfile: User, userLogged: User)(body: => Html) @subjectPresent() { @if(userProfile == userLogged){ @body } } and save this in a file called foo.scala.html You can ...


1

I've found a way the solved the problem, not the best I think, but it is the Steve Chaloner's solution (Deadbolt's creator), and it works. For example, if your Controller's method argument is named "id", and you want to check this id inside your checkAccess method : // Controller's method : @RestrictedResource(name = {"Domain"}) public static void ...


1

Off the top of my head, try quote it: #{deadbolt.restrictedResource resourceKeys:['projectEdit'], resourceParameters:['projectId':'${project.alias}']} Let me know if that works, and we can take it from there if necessary.


1

The seemingly variable availability of the context is starting to get a bit annoying. I'll change the signature of getRoleHolder() to take the context. Check in github in about 10 minutes, and update your Build.scala version of Deadbolt to take 1.1-SNAPSHOT



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